Youth

Youth

4.4 5
by Collective Soul
     
 
Well, this is a weird one. Collective Soul parted ways with their longtime record label, Atlantic, following the release of the 2001 hits collection 7even Year Itch, and it took them three years to deliver a new album, which meant there was a gap of four years separating their last proper studio

Overview

Well, this is a weird one. Collective Soul parted ways with their longtime record label, Atlantic, following the release of the 2001 hits collection 7even Year Itch, and it took them three years to deliver a new album, which meant there was a gap of four years separating their last proper studio album, 2000's Blender, and its 2004 follow-up, Youth. Freed from the pressures of a big record label and the constraints of post-grunge modern rock radio, the band seized the opportunity to reinvent itself. While they still retain some of their essential DNA, especially when they delve into ballads like "How Do You Love," they restyle themselves in fuzzy, shiny glam threads, sounding like a weird cross between David Bowie and INXS (and on "Feels Like (It Feels Alright)," Roland recalls nothing less than Peter Murphy in his vocals). Since Collective Soul are natives of the American South, they favor big riffs ready for big arenas to slinky T. Rex grooves, and since they once had big hits on the radio, they still favor big, glossy productions, but Youth still comes across as a stylized, somewhat modernized spin on heavy glam rock. It sounds a little bit like a streamlined, stateside Spacehog, which means that it doesn't necessarily sound hip, or like something that the "youth" of the album's title would dig, and it's not necessarily something that fans of their big ballads like "December" and "The World I Know" would like, either. But that doesn't mean it's a bad record. Far from it, actually. While the ballads are still a little too saccharine, there aren't many of them, and the rest of the record is fizzy, outsized, hooky, trashy fun. Anybody who considered Stone Temple Pilots a guilty pleasure, or thought that "Gel" was far and away Collective Soul's best song, should check this out -- it doesn't sound much like anything that the band has done before, or like anything that's on modern rock radio, but it's easily one of band's best records. It's a Collective Soul album for people who don't like Collective Soul.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/16/2004
Label:
El Music Group
UPC:
0187966000128
catalogNumber:
60001
Rank:
91071

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Collective Soul   Primary Artist
David Davidson   Violin
Jim Hoke   Saxophone
Joey Huffman   Organ
Ed Roland   Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals
Kris Wilkinson   Viola
Chris Donohue   Bass,Keyboards
Anthony J. Resta   Keyboards
Will Turpin   Bass,Percussion
Dean Roland   Rhythm Guitar
John Lancaster   Piano
Shane Evans   Percussion,Drums
Dave Angell   Violin
Kenny Cresswell   Percussion
Ryan Hoyle   Percussion,Drums
Dexter Green   Guitar,Piano,Keyboards
Michelle Rhea Caplinger   Background Vocals
Vanessa Davidson   Background Vocals
Sari Deleon Reist   Cello
Joel Kosche   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Melissa Mathes   Background Vocals
Teresa Schaefer   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

David Davidson   Arranger
Ed Roland   Composer,Producer
Anthony J. Resta   Programming
Shawn Grove   Engineer
Brian Porizek   Art Direction
James Warner   Engineer
Zack Odom   Engineer
Dexter Green   Composer,Programming,Producer
Aaron Chmielewski   Engineer
Annie Shu   Cover Model

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Youth 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To start with, this is their best CD since "Dosage". Tends to sound like that cd and their self titled third cd. "Blender" was a wrong turn that thankfully seems over. New guitarist adds a few new sounds without compromising signature sound. I will miss R. Childress, but was surprised I enjoyed this cd so much.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Going back to the best on this one.. Not to many ballads, solid rock. Overall one of, if not their best by far...
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a solid Collective Soul CD, great songs, but a very short CD. You would think after a three year break, they could come up an effort that lasts longer than 30 minutes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What happens when a successful band - finally free of the restrictions of being on a major label - reinvents itself? The answer can be heard across the latest release from Georgia-based Collective Soul. “Youth” is an 11-song disc that recalls the magic of Tears for Fears’ 2004 reawakening with “Everybody Loves a Happy Ending.” From the instantly-infectious crunch of “Counting the Days” to the intoxicating “Perfect to Stay,” this is an outstanding return by a band that seemed to have disappeared following the release of “Blender” in 2000. While there are hints of the post-grunge outfit that scored big with hits such as “Shine,” “December” and “The World I Know,” this is a more wide-ranging release. From beautiful ballads such as “How Do You Love” to post-glam Cheap Trick-meets-David Bowie rockers like “Feels Like (It Feels All Right)” and “Under Heaven’s Skies,” the Ed Roland-fronted band continues to artistically outdistance its Southern rock contemporaries (3 Doors Down, Seven Mary Three, Matchbox Twenty).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago