Youth: Its Education, Regimen, and Hygiene

Youth: Its Education, Regimen, and Hygiene

0.0 0
by Granville Stanley Hall
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Trade classes and schools, their importance in the international market —Our dangers and the superiority of German workmen—The… See more details below

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Trade classes and schools, their importance in the international market —Our dangers and the superiority of German workmen—The effects of a tariff—Description of schools between the kindergarten and the industrial school—Equal salaries for teachers in France—Dangers from machinery—The advantages of life on the old New England farm—Its resemblance to the education we now give negroes and Indians—Its advantage for all-sided muscular development. We must glance at a few of the best and most typical methods of muscular development, following the order: industrial education, manual training, gymnastics, and play, sports, and games. Jndustrialducation is now imperative for every nation that would excel in agriculture, manufacture, and trade, not only because of the growing intensity, of competition,- but because of the decline of the apprentice system and the growing intricacy of processes, requiring only the skill needed for livelihood. Thousands of our youth of late have been diverted from secondary schools to the monotechnic or trade classes now established for horology, glass-work, brick-laying, carpentry, forging, dressmaking, cooking, typesetting, bookbinding, brewing, seamanship, work in leather, rubber, horticulture, gardening, photography, basketry, stock-raising, typewriting, stenography and bookkeeping, elementary commercial training for practical preparation for clerkships, etc. In this work not only is Boston,our mostadvanced city, as President Pritchett1 has shown in detail, far behind Berlin, but German workmen and shopmen are slowly taking the best places even in England; and but for a high tariff, which protects our inferiority, the competitive pressure would be still greater. In Germany, especially, this training is far mor...

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940026238200
Publisher:
D. Appleton and company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Trade classes and schools, their importance in the international market Our dangers and the superiority of German workmenThe effects of a tariffDescription of schools between the kindergarten and the industrial schoolEqual salaries for teachers in FranceDangers from machineryThe advantages of life on the old New England farmIts resemblance to the education we now give negroes and IndiansIts advantage for all-sided muscular development. We must glance at a few of the best and most typical methods of muscular development, following the order: industrial education, manual training, gymnastics, and play, sports, and games. Jndustrialducation is now imperative for every nation that would excel in agriculture, manufacture, and trade, not only because of the growing intensity, of competition,- but because of the decline of the apprentice system and the growing intricacy of processes, requiring only the skill needed for livelihood. Thousands of our youth of late have been diverted from secondary schools to the monotechnic or trade classes now established for horology, glass-work, brick-laying, carpentry, forging, dressmaking, cooking, typesetting, bookbinding, brewing, seamanship, work in leather, rubber, horticulture, gardening, photography, basketry, stock-raising, typewriting, stenography and bookkeeping, elementary commercial training for practical preparation for clerkships, etc. In this work not only is Boston, our mostadvanced city, as President Pritchett1 has shown in detail, far behind Berlin, but German workmen and shopmen are slowly taking the best places even in England; and but for a high tariff, which protects our inferiority, thecompetitive pressure would be still greater. In Germany, especially, this training is far mor...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >