BN.com Gift Guide

Zeraffa Giraffa

Overview


This is the astonishing true story of Zeraffa, a giraffe who was sent as a gift by the Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt to King Charles X of France in 1826. A young boy, Atir, takes care of Zeraffa on her epic journey by felucca down the Nile and by ship across the sea. Zeraffa grows so tall that a hole is cut in the deck for her neck to go through, and the sailors sing songs as she gazes down at them. In France, Atir leads her through the countryside, and thousands of people marvel at Zeraffa in her yellow taffeta ...
See more details below
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


This is the astonishing true story of Zeraffa, a giraffe who was sent as a gift by the Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt to King Charles X of France in 1826. A young boy, Atir, takes care of Zeraffa on her epic journey by felucca down the Nile and by ship across the sea. Zeraffa grows so tall that a hole is cut in the deck for her neck to go through, and the sailors sing songs as she gazes down at them. In France, Atir leads her through the countryside, and thousands of people marvel at Zeraffa in her yellow taffeta cloak. The whole of Paris falls in love with Zeraffa and the King builds her a special house in the Jardin des Plantes. On warm nights, the young princess, granddaughter of the king, visits and listens while Atir whispers stories to Zeraffa of a hot land far away, and on the breeze they all feel the kiss of Africa.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
10/01/2014
Gr 2–5—In 1824, the Pasha of Egypt and Sudan entrusted his servant boy Atir to transport a young giraffe to Paris as a gift for King Charles X of France. In brief, lyrical text infused with conversation, Hofmeyr describes their lengthy trip: down the Nile, across the Mediterranean, and—on foot— from Marseilles to Paris and the special rotunda in the Jardin des Plantes built by the delighted king to house his new treasure where all could come to see her. Gentle Zeraffa spends her evenings in the company of the king's granddaughter, who feeds her apples and combs her mane, and her devoted caretaker, Atir, who whispers stories of the land where she was born. Ray's watercolor folk art-style paintings are masterful in their texture and minute detail. An informational page recaps the historical facts. Judith St. George's Zarafa: The Giraffe Who Walked to the King (Philomel, 2009, o.p.) has short informative sentences and is geared toward younger children. Hofmeyr and Ray have captured a tiny slice of 19th-century history.—Susan Scheps, formerly at Shaker Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-25
Stories of animal feats that sound as if they can't possibly be true are always intriguing, and this tale is one that bears repeating.While several children's books have been written about the giraffe who sailed across the Mediterranean from Egypt and then walked from Marseilles to Paris, arriving in 1827 after three years, this version is written for a slightly younger age group than the others. In spite of limited details, the telling is lively and largely accords with the known facts. The pasha of Egypt charges his servant Atir, a young man who accompanies the giraffe and lives with her until her death in 1845, with delivering the unusual living present to King Charles X of France. The giraffe inspires all sorts of fashions, biscuits, topiary hedges and hairdos. The author's note provides background and notes that the building, La Rotunde, constructed to house Zeraffa (in other accounts often called Belle) still exists. Unfortunately, there are no source notes. Whether Louise Marie Thérèse, the king's granddaughter, really crept out each night to stand with Zeraffa and Atir, staring toward the African continent, is probably a matter of poetic license. The detail-filled paintings, bursting with boats on the Nile, French crowds and the giraffe's accessories, will draw all eyes during group or individual readings.Not a tall tale at all but a captivating bit of history. (Picture book. 5-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847803443
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/7/2014
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 874,427
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Dianne Hofmeyr grew up on the tip of Southern Africa. An art teacher, she has written teenage novels and picture books, and has won the M-Net Award for fiction, as well as two IBBY Honor Books. Her other works include The Faraway Island, The Star Bearer and The Magic Bojabi Tree. She lives in the U.K. Jane Ray began her career as a designer but discovered a love for children's book illustration, especially fairy tales, mythology and folktales. Her acclaimed picture books include best-selling The Twelve Days of Christmas, The King of Capri, Greek Myths, and Ahmed and the Feather Girl. She lives in London.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)