Zero Tolerance

( 1 )

Overview

"Zero tolerance" began as a prohibition against guns, but it has quickly expanded into a frenzy of punishment and tougher disciplinary measures in American schools. Ironically -- as this timely collection makes clear -- recent research indicates that as schools adopt more zero tolerance policies they in fact become less safe, in part because the first casualties of these measures are the central, critical relationships between teacher and student and between school and community.

Zero Tolerance assembles ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $21.65   
  • Used (18) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"Zero tolerance" began as a prohibition against guns, but it has quickly expanded into a frenzy of punishment and tougher disciplinary measures in American schools. Ironically -- as this timely collection makes clear -- recent research indicates that as schools adopt more zero tolerance policies they in fact become less safe, in part because the first casualties of these measures are the central, critical relationships between teacher and student and between school and community.

Zero Tolerance assembles prominent educators and intellectuals along with students and community activists to show that the vast majority of students expelled from schools under new disciplinary measures are sent home for non-violent violations; that the rush to judge and punish disproportionately affects black and Latino children; and that the new disciplinary ethos is eroding constitutional protections of privacy, free speech, and due process. Sure to become the focus of controversy, this book presents a passionate, multifaceted argument against the militarization of our schools.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In the wake of recent school shootings, zero-tolerance policies have sprung up across the nation in an effort to curb the violence supposedly running rampant in American educational institutions. But are such policies working, or are they causing more harm than good? And is school violence really on the increase, or is this merely the public's perception, fueled by increased media coverage? This collection of 20 essays-compiled by a professor of education, a high school teacher, and a clinical professor-examines the use of zero-tolerance policies across America, explaining the reasoning behind their creation, analyzing their effectiveness, and suggesting alternatives. While contributors, who include Rev. Jesse L. Jackson and Michelle Fine, share similar views (e.g., kicking youths out of school increases their likelihood of criminal behavior, racial profiling appears connected to zero-tolerance policies, and public perception of school violence does not correspond with statistics), each puts his or her own twist on the subject. The result is a quality collection that should find its way into every public and academic library.-Terry Christner, Hutchinson P.L., KS
Kirkus Reviews
An analysis of the "zero tolerance" policies often implemented in today's schools, and the ways these policies have disproportionately affected black and Latino students. "Zero tolerance" initially meant that any student bringing a gun to school would be expelled for up to two years. In many schools, however, the policy has come to cover not only realistic replicas of firearms and knives, but objects that, by virtue of their shape or design, could cause any physical harm, or even give the appearance of being able to do so. It is this nebulous wording that has the editors worried. William Ayers (A Kind and Just Parent, 1997), Dohrn (director, Children and Family Justice Center/Northwestern Univ.), and Berkeley High School teacher Rick Ayers argue that the rates of school punishment for black students exceed rates for white students. Clear examples in support of their theory are periodically given: A white student in Vermont was neither suspended nor expelled for bringing a loaded shotgun to school, while an African-American student in Rhode Island was suspended for offering to dislodge a computer disk with a penknife. At other times, the authors' rhetoric misses the mark: When six African-American students expelled for fighting try to return to their campus illegally, the situation is likened to "the 1957 placement of National Guard troops at Central High School in Little Rock." One wishes the editors had declared zero tolerance for purple prose: "Tears moistened the principal's eyes as she watched the axe fall on twelve-year-old Arturo, a student she had known since she first became the principal of the elementary school on Chicago's South Side." Even so, these are mostly sound essaysilluminating how the media's coverage of juvenile crime has led to blanket policies that can make little sense.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565846661
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 11/1/2001
  • Pages: 263
  • Product dimensions: 0.60 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction: Resisting Zero Tolerance
Pt. 1 Narratives 1
Ground Zero 3
Two Punches, Expelled for Life 15
Arturo's Case 31
From the Jail Yard to the School Yard 42
Racial Profiling at School: The Politics of Race and Discipline at Berkeley High 51
Decatur: A Story of Intolerance 64
America Still Eats Her Young 77
Pt. 2 Social Contexts 87
"Look Out Kid/It's Something You Did": Zero Tolerance for Children 89
How Distorted Coverage of Juvenile Crime Affects Public Policy 114
Zero Tolerance as Mandatory Sentencing 126
Education, Delinquency, and Incarceration 136
Sexual Harassment Meets Zero Tolerance: Life in K-12 Schools 143
Sticks and Stones: The Jailing of Mentally Ill Kids 155
Pt. 3 Education and Activism 163
Zero Tolerance: A Basic Racial Report Card 165
When Is Disproportionality Discrimination? The Overrepresentation of Black Students in School Suspension 176
The ABCs of School Discipline: Lessons from Miami-Dade County 188
Finding Safety Where We Least Expect It: The Role of Social Capital in Preventing School Violence 202
Turning to Each Other, Not on Each Other: How School Communities Prevent Racial Bias in School Discipline 219
The Role of Law in Policing Abusive Disciplinary Practices: Why School Discipline Is a Civil Rights Issue 230
Zero Tolerance: Reflections on a Failed Policy That Won't Die 256
Permissions 265
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2004

    Perfect for people making discipline decisions for children

    Author speaks from experience with practical advice. Easy to read-hard to reflect on.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)