Zia

Zia

3.8 35
by Scott O'Dell
     
 

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A young Indian girl, caught between the traditional world of her mother and the present world of the mission, is helped by her Aunt Karana, whose story was told in Island of the Blue Dolphins. "Bound to be among the outstanding books of the year." -- Publishers Weekly  See more details below

Overview

A young Indian girl, caught between the traditional world of her mother and the present world of the mission, is helped by her Aunt Karana, whose story was told in Island of the Blue Dolphins. "Bound to be among the outstanding books of the year." -- Publishers Weekly

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Maggie Chase
In this sequel to Island of the Blue Dolphins, Karana's niece Zia takes center stage. Throughout her childhood Zia had heard the stories about her aunt and is determined to be the one to "rescue" her aunt from the island. Independent, strong-willed, and determined, Zia sets about making plans to row to the island, persuading her younger brother to help her in her quest. Twice they fail, the second time because they are kidnapped by Yankee whalers and put to work aboard a ship. Eventually they escape and return to the mainland. Woven into the plot is the struggle of the native people who are taken into forced labor and exploited by the local missions. When the laborers escape in the middle of the night, Zia is imprisoned for her role in their exodus. From her prison cell she is able to witness her aunt's arrival and the two finally meet with outstretched hands through the cell's barred window. This story has plenty of tension and action to sustain a reader's interest. Finely but not overly articulated details of the life, the people, and the landscape of both sea and land around the 1850's in California lay a foundation for understanding how the coastal regions were developed and how native peoples contributed to that development. It is a great book for examining social justice issues and exploitation of an impoverished people, while at the same time, offering up an adventure story that is at times edge-of-your-seat gripping. Reviewer: Maggie Chase
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zia and her brother set out to rescue their aunt, Karana, in this sequel to the Newbery Award-winning Island of the Blue Dolphins. Ages 9-12. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
"Bound to be among the outstanding books of the year." —Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440410010
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/28/1995
Pages:
179
Product dimensions:
5.36(w) x 7.68(h) x 0.49(d)
Lexile:
790L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

An excerpt from Zia

            "To the Island of the Blue Dolphins," Mando said. "We will find Karana
            and bring her home." He paused and his face lighted up. "We could
            put a sail on the boat and sail sometimes when the wind was blowing.
            Then we could row when it was calm. We could do both. We could row
            and sail. In two days or three we would reach the island."

            "Maybe she is not there now," I said.

            "Maybe she is dead," said Mando. "Maybe wild dogs ate her up."

            "It is possible," I said to put an end to these thoughts. "But the
            white man, Captain Nidiver, saw her footsteps in the sand when he
            was there last year."

            "Why did he not follow the footsteps? That's what I would like to
            know."

            "There was a storm coming up and he feared for his boat."

            "I will ask Mukat and Zando about these things. Then we will know.
            And maybe Father Merced also. No. Not him. Father Vicente? Maybe he
            will come with us. It would make it easier with three of us. The I
            could fish while we sailed along. It would be easier even if I did
            not fish. But I am afraid of what Father Merced will say. Likewise
            Father Vicente. They may not allow us to go."

            I felt angry. "We will go anyway, whatever is said. We are not chained
            to the earth. We have a boat and oars and an anchor. What are they
            for? They belong to us. To go out in San Felipe lagoon, is that what
            they are meant for?"

            

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Meet the Author

Scott O’Dell (1898–1989), one of the most respected authors of historical fiction, received the Newbery Medal, three Newbery Honor Medals, and the Hans Christian Andersen Author Medal, the highest international recognition for a body of work by an author of books for young readers. Some of his many books include The Island of the Blue Dolphins, The Road to Damietta, Sing Down the Moon, and The Black Pearl.

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