Ziggy's Blue-Ribbon Day
  • Ziggy's Blue-Ribbon Day
  • Ziggy's Blue-Ribbon Day

Ziggy's Blue-Ribbon Day

by Claudia Mills, R. W. Alley
     
 

Every kid’s a winner!

Ziggy dreads track-and-field day. He isn’t good at running races or at high or long jumping. He isn’t good at throwing balls, either. Ziggy is good at drawing pictures, but there’s no picturedrawing event on track-and-field day. At least he can decorate the envelope that will hold his disappointing gray ribbons

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Every kid’s a winner!

Ziggy dreads track-and-field day. He isn’t good at running races or at high or long jumping. He isn’t good at throwing balls, either. Ziggy is good at drawing pictures, but there’s no picturedrawing event on track-and-field day. At least he can decorate the envelope that will hold his disappointing gray ribbons. To Ziggy’s surprise, his drawing becomes a huge hit! The kids all want their envelopes decorated by Ziggy – and offer him their blue ribbons in exchange.

Bright, animated pictures add spunk to a story about the joy of doing what one does best.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Mills draws a neat, unaffected line under being recognized for what you do best and the unlikely venues that can serve to display your particular talent." — Kirkus Reviews

"With his alternatively earned awards and an orange Popsicle in hand, Ziggy has to admit that track-and-field day is kind of fun after all." — The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"A heartening story for kids who don't excel on the playing field but have other talents. Alley's paintings capture the school milieu with keenly observed details and a wry humor. This upbeat picture book has broad appeal." — Booklist

"The lively color cartoon illustrations succinctly express Ziggy's passion." — School Library Journal

Children's Literature
On track-and-field day, Ziggy is hoping for rain. He is good at drawing, but not at any of the events of the day. His teacher emphasizes that it is important to do your best, cheer for everyone, and have fun. But as he has tried and cheered, but has only a silver/gray participant ribbon for each event, Ziggy feels bad. Still his classmates come to admire the beautiful pictures he has drawn on the envelope with his ribbons, and offer him one of their prize blue ribbons if he will decorate theirs. Ziggy happily skips the optional races and draws away. He ends up with five blue ribbons for doing what he likes to do, and has had fun as well. Alley's double-page scenes depict a mixed group of elementary youngsters in energetic action unashamedly displaying their emotions. Ziggy's feelings seem more pensive, even dreamy in one scene, as he creates his pictures, still feeling demoralized by his failures. But as he is asked to draw by his classmates, his face becomes animated and his posture upright. In this hopeful story—which could open class discussions—individuals are valued for their different talents. 2005, Farrar Straus and Giroux, Ages 4 to 7.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Ziggy isn't athletic, but he loves to draw. On the day of the track-and-field meet, he is anxious. He reluctantly joins his classmates outdoors, where all the participants will receive ribbons for competing in the day's events-blue for first place, then red, or gold, or silver. While waiting for a race to begin, Ziggy colors the outside of the envelope in which he is to collect his ribbons; he is sure that they all will be silver. When a classmate spots his artwork, she asks him to draw on her envelope in exchange for one of her blue ribbons. Soon, other students are bartering theirs for his drawing services. The lively color cartoon illustrations succinctly express Ziggy's passion.-Linda Zeilstra Sawyer, Skokie Public Library, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Poor Ziggy: Track-and-Field Day at school is a pox on his life; he isn't good at running or throwing balls or jumping. On the other hand, he likes to draw; if they only gave a blue ribbon for drawing pictures, he sighs. Ziggy's both right and wrong: He tanks at the sporting events, true, but he garners a whole fistful of ribbons from the other kids when they ask him to decorate the envelopes, into which they're putting their ribbons. Mills draws a neat, unaffected line under being recognized for what you do best and the unlikely venues that can serve to display your particular talent. Alley's illustrations convey a genuine sense of Ziggy's frustrations on the field, but also the focus and bliss that drawing brings into his life. (Picture book. 4-7)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374323523
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
08/11/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.38(d)
Lexile:
AD560L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >