Zombie Baseball Beatdown

( 7 )

Overview

In this inventive, fast-paced novel, New York Times bestselling and Printz Award-winning author Paolo Bacigalupi takes on hard-hitting themes--from food safety to racism and immigration--and creates a zany, grand-slam adventure that will get kids thinking about where their food comes from.

The zombie apocalypse begins on the day Rabi, Miguel, and Joe are practicing baseball near their town's local meatpacking plant and nearly get knocked out by a really big stink. Little do they...

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Zombie Baseball Beatdown

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Overview

In this inventive, fast-paced novel, New York Times bestselling and Printz Award-winning author Paolo Bacigalupi takes on hard-hitting themes--from food safety to racism and immigration--and creates a zany, grand-slam adventure that will get kids thinking about where their food comes from.

The zombie apocalypse begins on the day Rabi, Miguel, and Joe are practicing baseball near their town's local meatpacking plant and nearly get knocked out by a really big stink. Little do they know the plant's toxic cattle feed is turning cows into flesh-craving monsters! The boys decide to launch a stealth investigation into the plant's dangerous practices, unknowingly discovering a greedy corporation's plot to look the other way as tainted meat is sold to thousands all over the country. With no grownups left they can trust, Rabi and his friends will have to grab their bats to protect themselves (and a few of their enemies) if they want to stay alive...and maybe even save the world.

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  • Zombie Baseball Beatdown
    Zombie Baseball Beatdown  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
01/27/2014
When his friend Miguel’s family is deported, young Rabi Chatterjee-Jones uncovers a conspiracy at Milrow Meat Solutions, the small town’s local meatpacking plant, that has him and his friends dodging zombies and clashing with corporate lawyers in an effort to save the world. While it may seem like a stretch, there’s an antifactory farming slant to this hilarious story from Bacigalupi, which is adroitly narrated by Malhotra. Throughout, the reader’s pacing is superb and his comic timing perfect. Malhotra’s characterization are rich and complex—despite the fact that this may seem a silly comedy-horror mash-up—and his spirited delivery of Bacigalupi’s prose brings more to the table than the book’s title may imply, including some commentary about the meatpacking industry. Ages 8–12. A Little, Brown hardcover. (Sept.)
Publishers Weekly
Printz-winner Bacigalupi (Ship Breaker) defies the expectations of the comedy-horror genre, turning this zombie novel into an effective bit of social commentary while staying true to the story’s grisly and goofy roots. In a small town dominated by Milrow Meat Solutions, Rabi Chatterjee-Jones is a normal kid, mostly concerned with not making a fool of himself playing baseball, and spending time with his friends Miguel and Joe. Shortly after Miguel’s family—illegal immigrants, like many who work in the meatpacking industry—is deported, the boys run into a zombie and start to suspect that there’s more than meets the eye at the plant. There are some familiar zombie-tale elements (yes, the zombies shout for “brains,” and, no, the police don’t believe the boys), but their biggest nemeses are corporate lawyers and plant managers. Bacigalupi rails against factory farming, the abuse of illegal immigrants, and ag-gag laws, but never lets the humorous elements fall by the wayside. Casual readers will have a blast, and those who look deeper will learn something, too. Ages 8–12. Agent: Martha Millard, Martha Millard Literary Agency. (Sept.)
Booklist

"Printz-winning Bacigalupi writing a middle-grade zombie novel? Yes, it really happened, and yes, it's pretty darn good....Simultaneously smart, funny, and icky, this book asks a tough question: Is it worth looking the other way in order to save yourself?"
Library Media Connection
"Batting comes in handy beating down zombies....Will appeal to reluctant readers."
The Bulletin
"[Introduces] reluctant readers to activism through literature.... a dark comedy with a bit of heart."
From the Publisher

A 2013 VOYA Top Shelf Fiction for Middle School Readers BookA 2013 Association of Booksellers for Children Best Book for Children

A 2013 Booklist Best Audiobook of the Year
A 2014 Children's Book Committee at Bank Street College Outstanding Book
A 2014 ALSC Notable Children's Recording
A 2014 YALSA Top Ten Amazing Audiobook
A 2014 Maine Student Book Award Winner

"Printz-winning Bacigalupi writing a middle-grade zombie novel? Yes, it really happened, and yes, it's pretty darn good....Simultaneously smart, funny, and icky, this book asks a tough question: Is it worth looking the other way in order to save yourself?"—Booklist

"A high-energy, high-humor look at the zombie apocalypse....a signal alert to young teens to think about what they eat....sure to be appreciated by middle school zombie cognoscenti."—Kirkus Reviews

"Defies the expectations of the comedy-horror genre, turning this zombie novel into an effective bit of social commentary while staying true to the story's grisly and goofy roots....Casual readers will have a blast, and those who look deeper will learn something, too."—Publishers Weekly

"It's a testament to the author's skill that [the characters] express values of courage, friendship, and integrity as naturally as they toss off hilarious observations....[A] fast-paced home run."—School Library Journal

"[Introduces] reluctant readers to activism through literature.... a dark comedy with a bit of heart."—The Bulletin

"Batting comes in handy beating down zombies....Will appeal to reluctant readers."—Library Media Connection

Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
Chased away from the town’s “good” baseball field by bullies, three friends named Rabi, Miguel, and Joe take their practice to the one near the meatpacking plant. A stomach-churning stench convinces the friends that something is seriously wrong at the facility. They cannot resist nosing around, and a bit of investigating turns up proof that the company has been feeding the cows a toxic blend that is turning them all into zombies intent upon human flesh. Soon, they boys are finding themselves faced off against their newly-zombified former baseball coach, a herd of bovine zombies, and a herd of person zombies…will they be able to save their town? The world? A small meatpacking town may seem an unlikely place for a zombiepocalypse, and three boys with baseball bats may seem unlikely heroes, but Bacigalupi’s fast-paced entry into the rapidly-growing field of zombie fiction holds readers’ interest. Those who make it past the lurid cover will find it hard to put this down. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green AGERANGE: Ages 8 to 13.
School Library Journal
Gr 5–9—Don't be misled by this novel's horror B-movie title and cover art: thought-provoking, topical issues and wry wit elevate it above the expected gross-out zombie tale. Middle school friends Rabi, Miguel, and Joe literally smell trouble wafting from their small town's meatpacking plant, where they find cows living in filthy conditions and behaving oddly. Then the boys' baseball coach turns up moaning "Brainsssss!" and tries to bite Rabi. When the children discover that meat from the sick cows is being packaged and sent to local supermarkets, they are on their own to prevent a zombie cow apocalypse because no one believes their story. Miguel's revelation that he's in the country illegally introduces biting commentary on racism and immigration. Bacigalupi also zings big business, the meatpacking industry, and the USDA, culminating in an epilogue that's both cautionary and empowering. Rabi, Miguel, and Joe are realistic, complete characters. It's a testament to the author's skill that they express values of courage, friendship, and integrity as naturally as they toss off hilarious observations: "Talk about ankle biters," Rabi comments when he sees two little zombie girls chewing on a man's leg. References to current video games and cyberpunk comics add appeal to this fast-paced home run.—Marybeth Kozikowski, Sachem Public Library, Holbrook, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Upton Sinclair's The Jungle meets Left for Dead/The Walking Dead/Shaun of the Dead in a high-energy, high-humor look at the zombie apocalypse, complete with baseball (rather than cricket) bats. The wholesome-seeming Iowa cornfields are a perfect setting for the emergence of ghastly anomalies: flesh-eating cows and baseball-coach zombies. The narrator hero, Rabi (for Rabindranath), and his youth baseball teammates and friends, Miguel and Joe, discover by chance that all is not well with their small town's principal industry: the Milrow corporation's giant feedlot and meat-production and -packing facility. The ponds of cow poo and crammed quarters for the animals are described in gaggingly smelly detail, and the bone-breaking, bloody, flesh-smashing encounters with the zombies have a high gross-out factor. The zombie cows and zombie humans who emerge from the muck are apparently a product of the food supply gone cuckoo in service of big-money profits with little concern for the end result. It's up to Rabi and his pals to try to prove what's going on--and to survive the corporation's efforts to silence them. Much as Bacigalupi's Ship Breaker (2010) was a clarion call to action against climate change, here's a signal alert to young teens to think about what they eat, while the considerable appeal of the characters and plot defies any preachiness. Not for the faint of heart or stomach (or maybe of any parts) but sure to be appreciated by middle school zombie cognoscenti. (Fiction. 11-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804121521
  • Publisher: Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/10/2013
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Paolo Bacigalupi

Paolo Bacigalupi is the author of the highly acclaimed The Drowned Cities and the New York Times bestselling Ship Breaker, which was also a Michael L. Printz Award winner and a National Book Award finalist. He is also the author of The Windup Girl and Pump Six and Other Stories, and is a Hugo, Nebula, Locus, Compton Crook, John W. Campbell Memorial, and Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award winner. He lives in western Colorado with his wife and son.

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Read an Excerpt

Zombie Baseball Beatdown


By Paolo Bacigalupi

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2013 Paolo Bacigalupi
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-316-22078-1



CHAPTER 1

Losing sucks.

Don't let anyone tell you it builds character or any of that junk; it sucks. It sucks that someone else is beating you. It sucks that you've worked so hard and it's going to mean nothing. It sucks that you can't hit the ball the way you want and can't field the grounder the way you imagined—a thousand things about losing suck.

But it sucks worse when you're stuck in the dugout on a 102-degree day in the humidity, and the heat index is 120, and sweat is pouring off you, and your team is losing—not because you suck at baseball, but because your baseball coach, Mr. Cocoran, sucks at coaching.

Mr. Cocoran won't listen to you when you tell him he's got the batting order wrong. He likes big hits and loves guys who hack at the ball and swing for the fences and all that junk, and he doesn't understand about getting runners on base. He doesn't know squat about baseball.

But you know the thing about losing that sucks even worse than that?

Knowing you're the one who's going to get blamed.

When you're finally up at bat, with Miguel on third and Sammy on first, and you're down by two in the bottom of the sixth, and you're the last and final hope of the Delbe Diamondbacks—you're the one everyone is going to remember.

Maybe I could hit a single on my good days (and if the pitcher was off his game), but basically, for me, the ball just moves too darn fast.

My dad says I swing with my heart.

Well, he said that after I struck out once and spun myself all the way around and all the other kids were so busy laughing at me—even my own team—that nobody minded so much that we'd lost another game.

After that game, my dad came up to me and put his hand on my shoulder and said, "Don't worry about it, Rabi; you swung with your heart. You were all in. We can work on your swing. As soon as I'm back from the rigs, we'll work on it."

Of course, baseball season was going to be over by then, so my swing wasn't going to improve in time to save me from more humiliation. Dad works oil and gas rigs—ten weeks on, two weeks off—so I was on my own.

There was no way I should have been batting cleanup, I can tell you that, but there I was, sitting on the bench, watching the lineup come down to me, like a slow-moving train wreck.

Miguel was sitting next to me, chewing gum. "What're the odds?" he asked.

I shrugged. "I don't know."

"Come on, Rabi." Joe, who was sitting on my other side, poked me in the ribs. "Do that trick you do. With the numbers."

A couple of the older guys, Travis Thompson and Sammy Riggoni, both looked over. Beefy dudes with mean piggy eyes who liked to hassle anyone who was littler than them. I didn't want their attention at all. I looked away.

"Nah," I said. "There's not enough numbers to do it. I need more stats. You can't do stats with Little League. You need a lot of numbers before you can predict anything."

"Come on," Miguel said. "You know you can."

I looked out at the bases, frowning. I studied the batters in our lineup, eyed the Eamons Eagles defense, their catcher and fielders and pitcher. And then I started setting stats. It was a trick I used. I could set stats over the different players' heads in my mind, a little like health bars in World of Warcraft, and then I could figure out probable outcomes.

Numbers. Stats. I have a cousin in Boston who calls it my inner Asian math nerd.

But whatever it is, I'm good at it. The Eagles pitcher was still going strong, even after pitching most of the game. We hadn't worn him down much. I'd read up on his stats and seen how he normally did after pitching four innings. I'd been counting how many times he'd actually had to pitch against all our batters, and I knew he wasn't tired. Not a bit.

He'd just struck out Billy Freudenberg on three straight pitches. And now Shawn Carney, at the plate, had two balls and two strikes on him. But Shawn barely hit .225, even against a weak pitcher. Against the Eamons guy, he was more like .075. Shawn was always hacking at random pitches. When he hit, he hit with power, but the Eamons pitcher was smart enough to bait him into swinging at a mean little curveball.

Shawn was dead meat.

Then there'd be Miguel. Miguel was hitting .525 on the season, steady all the time, dangerous. And the Eamons pitcher was afraid of him. Miguel could get himself on base, for sure. He was a slugger and he hit for extra bases more often than not. After that, Sammy would be up—.305, but not with as much power as Miguel. Then there'd be me. It all added up to ...

"You need a double or better," I said. "And Sammy needs the same for us to tie."

Miguel cracked his gum. "And if we do, that means you got to ..."

"I got to do anything except strike out. Anything at all."

"What are the odds?"

I laughed. "If you two nail it? Twenty to one, against. If you don't?" I shrugged. "No shot."

"Don't sell yourself short," Miguel said. "You can get on, no problem."

"Numbers don't lie. It wouldn't be a problem if they moved me ahead of you two. I do better when there's no one on base, and no pressure. If Mr. Cocoran would just concentrate on getting players on base, concentrate on getting more walks instead of big hits, we'd already be winning right now. And this wouldn't matter at all. We'd probably be up two at this point. Game over, Delbe wins."

Miguel nodded out at Shawn, who was getting ready for his next pitch. "What if Shawn gets a hit?"

I looked over at the redheaded boy. "He won't. Not with two strikes on him. He always chokes once he gets two strikes."

"Shut up, Rabi. You're on a team."

That was Mr. Cocoran, our king of a coach. Funny-looking guy with a big nose and a face that was red like a tandoori chicken. He was always irritated. Mostly at me. "You don't rip your own teammates," Mr. Cocoran said. "Especially with your batting average."

Sammy Riggoni snickered. "Yeah, Rabi, have you even hit a ball this season?"

I think somewhere in the Little League rule book, there's something about being a good sport, and everyone playing hard, and winning clean, and working together as a team. I'm pretty sure it's there, somewhere.

For Mr. Cocoran, that meant telling the good players they were amazing, and pretending the crummy players didn't exist. I mean, sure, I'm a terrible hitter. But so is Shawn. I'm not being mean; the kid's got a serious hole in his swing. When the count's 2–2, he always chokes. It doesn't do any good to stand around clapping and cheering and saying he can do it, after you've spent the entire season ignoring the problem.

My dad says there's no point pretending reality doesn't exist; otherwise, you can't fix anything. Mr. Cocoran should have paid attention to Shawn and helped him get better. Instead, he spent his time helping Sammy, because Sammy was a "natural."

That was how Cocoran rolled, and now, under Cocoran's glare, I shut up. I didn't want to argue with him, and I sure didn't want to get in a fight with Sammy. Besides, two seconds later, the numbers lined up, just like I expected, and made my point for me. Shawn hacked at a crummy pitch and popped the ball straight up, and the catcher snagged it nice and easy. Two outs.

Cocoran glared at me even harder.

It's got to be annoying when a middle school kid knows more about baseball than you.

Miguel was up. He went out into the sun, and just like the numbers predicted, he got a hit. He roped a double, which wasn't as good as we needed. Then Sammy singled, which moved Miguel to third. If Sammy had tripled, then we would've had a chance ... but no.

It was down to me, walking out to home plate.

It should have been Miguel standing where I was now. The guy who hits a double on his bad day. If Cocoran had changed the batting order, Miguel could have driven runs in all day long. Instead he liked to get Miguel out there early, and tried to get him to steal bases.

Cocoran was standing at the entrance to the dugout, sweating and shouting for me to make it happen. I stood over the plate. The pitcher was looking at me, smirking. He had runners on first and third, which might have worried him, except he was facing me, a batter he'd struck out every time. He knew that I was the end of the inning—and the game.

Miguel was nodding encouragingly, willing me to bring him home. Sammy was just staring at me. I could tell he hated that he had to depend on a shrimp like me to do something right for once. Too bad for him that I'm a strategizer, not a slugger. I think. I don't do.

The sun pounded down. The stands got quiet.

And then my mom started clapping.

Everyone swung around to look at her.

There she was, up in the stands, calling, "Rabindranath! Ra-bin-dra-nath! Ra-bin-dra-nath!" This crazy Indian lady in a bright yellow sari, with night-black hair in a bun and a red bindi in the middle of her brown forehead, was cheering for me. She didn't care that everyone was looking at her, or that she was embarrassing me. She was all in, supporting her son.

I wanted to die.

I looked down at the plate, then up at the pitcher. He was grinning at me. He knew he had me now. And that made me mad, him thinking he could just whup me that way.

So what if I had a name no one could pronounce? So what if I had a mom who wore saris? I was going to take his pitch and knock the cover off the ball. I was going to teach them all not to laugh at me.

I looked at the pitcher, and I pointed, just pointed toward left field, letting him know where I was going to put the ball, staring him down, letting him know that I owned him.

Rabindranath Chatterjee-Jones was going to knock the ball out of the park.

Around me, everyone went quiet. Even my mom.

I was ready. I touched the plate. Wound up the bat.

The pitch came in high.

I let it go.

"Strike one!" the umpire shouted.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Zombie Baseball Beatdown by Paolo Bacigalupi. Copyright © 2013 Paolo Bacigalupi. Excerpted by permission of Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

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( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 17, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Kayti Nika Raet for Readers' Favorite Looks like th

    Reviewed by Kayti Nika Raet for Readers' Favorite

    Looks like there's a new kind of Mad Cow Disease running around. Sure you want to eat that burger? Zombie Baseball Beatdown by Paolo Bacigalupi (Shipbreaker, The Drowned Cities) is an awesome, fast paced zombie/apocalypse yarn that tackles issues like racism, immigration, and factory farming as well as problems of the undead sort.

    When thirteen-year-old Rabi (short for Rabindranath) and his friends Miguel and Joe encounter a really big stink while playing baseball near their town's local feedlot, little do they know that it's Ground Zero for some really nasty zombie pathogens. Then their team's baseball coach gets too close to one and becomes a zombie himself. When no one believes them, they are forced to investigate on their own, fending off zombies and corrupt corporations. Rabi and his friends must get to the bottom of the zombie outbreak and prevent the tainted zombie meat from reaching the supermarket shelves.

    I'm a HUGE fan of Paolo Bacigalupi so, even though Zombie Baseball Beatdown was geared toward a slightly younger audience than his previous two books, I was still super excited and it did no disappoint. It's totally awesome and Bacigalupi doesn't make the mistake of talking down to his readers, even when dealing with heavier topics like racism, immigration, and corporate corruption. Rabi's a very likable character and topics he and his friends bring up while beating back the zombie hoard are sure to spark discussion.

    Zombie Baseball Beatdown reminded me of a mix between Beauty Queens and Bud Not Buddy and the action packed cover is sure to draw anyone's eye.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2013

    Great read.

    Bacigalupi is a great author and this is an entertaining zombie novel read. I enjoy the genre and wish half the authors were even a quarter this good... If you like a well written zombie story -- this one won't disappoint.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2014

    By tyler

    I like cake???????????{}[]:)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2014

    Jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj

    A

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    Dfghj

    %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%tfffffffffffffffffffff%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%$%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%$34,658%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%444%%4%%%%%&%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%8+8:16%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%456-%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&%%%%%%%%%%%&&$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$56%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%@##%&*@#$%&*%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&&

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2013

    Luke is my name

    I can drive and I am only 7 .

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    by Casey

    I have not red it yet.

    But it sawnds gud

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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