Zooman Sam

Zooman Sam

5.0 2
by Lois Lowry, Diane deGroat
     
 

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It's Future Job Day at Sam's school, and Sam knows exactly what he wants to be when he grows up-a zookeeper, just like Zookeeper Jake in his favorite picture book. His mother and big sister, Anastasia, help Sam create a memorable costume-so memorable that Sam insists on wearing it long after Future Job Day has passed and the rest of his classmates are back in their… See more details below

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Overview

It's Future Job Day at Sam's school, and Sam knows exactly what he wants to be when he grows up-a zookeeper, just like Zookeeper Jake in his favorite picture book. His mother and big sister, Anastasia, help Sam create a memorable costume-so memorable that Sam insists on wearing it long after Future Job Day has passed and the rest of his classmates are back in their regular clothes. Encouraged by Mrs. Bennett, his teacher, Sam embarks on a lengthy project to teach his preschool class about a zookeeper's responsibilities, and along the way learns just how difficult a job teaching is. As always, the patient and loving Krupnik family stands by as Anastasia's irrepressible little brother struggles with a set of nearly impossible goals. Children will delight in this latest story featuring the precocious and irresistible Sam.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book
(Intermediate)
It's Future Job Day at Sam's nursery school, and not only has his mom made him a "Zooman Sam" jumpsuit, his sister Anastasia has acquired for him a whole mess of sports caps with such fitting logos as Tigers and Cubs. In a class filled with future firefighters, Sam's zookeeping aspirations really stand out, and he's especially thrilled when his teacher tells him he can wear a different cap each day and tell the other children about each animal: "For six weeks he could stand in front of the circle and feel that feeling of being the most interesting person in the room." This is a slender thread on which to hang an entire novel, but Lowry spins interesting variations on her theme, and the book ends with a swell (and well-prepared) surprise. Sam remains every middle-grader's little brother; parents, too, will be amused. r.s.
Children's Literature - Heidi Green
The fourth of Lois Lowry's books about Sam Krupnik is as enjoyable as her previous three, as well as her books about Sam's unforgettable older sister, Anastasia. Sam is just four years old, but he knows exactly what he wants to be when he grows up--a zookeeper. So when his nursery school teacher asks all the students to come dressed as a member of their future profession, Sam has no problem with this except that he lost the note about the assignment and forgot to tell his family about it until the night before. And so, with the help of Anastasia and their mother, he becomes Zooman Sam ("Zookeeper" just won't fit on the coverall when Mrs. Krupnik is stitching the words), charged with the task of explaining the wide assortment of zookeeper responsibilities. It takes Sam days, and he ultimately learns not only about being zookeeper, but also about being a teacher. Ultimately, he discovers something even more important about himself, and this provides a satisfying conclusion to an endearing book.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4 Four-year-old Sam Krupnik longs for recognition and a moment in the spotlight. Fortunately, he has an understanding and patient family so that when he decides to be a zookeeper for Future Job Day at his nursery school, his mother stitches up a uniform and his older sister, Anastasia, provides 30 hats, each with an animal's name on it (Cubs, Gaitors, Lions, etc.), donated by her friend's sportscaster father. Sam also has an understanding teacher who uses the boy's lengthy presentation to discuss one animal each day and to read an appropriate book. In the process of choosing his hat for each day and talking about the animals, Sam has learned to read, and impressing others doesn't matter that much any longer. Another visit with the Krupniks is time well spent, for they are uncomplicated, funny, and unpretentious. A few black-and-white drawings are scattered throughout and add to the fun. Great as a read-alone, or as a read-aloud to younger children. Marlene Gawron, Orange County Library, Orlando, FL Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
For "Future Job Day" at Sam Krupnik's nursery school, the four-year-olds have been instructed to dress up as representatives of their desired profession. Sam doesn't want to be a fireman, as do all the other boys in his class. Instead he wants to be "somebody important, somebody interesting, somebody more than ordinary," a secret concept he privately and quite marvelously dubs "the Chief of Wonderfulness." With the assistance of his impossibly even-tempered mother and ever-helpful sister, Anastasia, Sam dresses up in a spiffy homemade zookeeper's costume. Sam's teacher allows Sam to tell his class about a different zoo animal every day, a privilege that he finds both thrilling and challenging. The plotting is leisurely, the story is slender, and a subplot about the training of the family dog barely registers. This cast of familiar characters isn't as vibrant as usual, and the material runs out of steam before the novel ends. Fans of the Sam books may find satisfaction in the nicely foreshadowed but still unanticipated punch line. (Fiction. 7-12)

From the Publisher

It's Future Job Day at Sam's nursery school, and not only has his mom made him a "Zooman Sam" jumpsuit, his sister Anastasia has acquired for him a whole mess of sports caps with such fitting logos as Tigers and Cubs. In a class filled with future firefighters, Sam's zookeeping aspirations really stand out, and he's especially thrilled when his teacher tells him he can wear a different cap each day and tell the other children about each animal: "For six weeks he could stand in front of the circle and feel that feeling of being the most interesting person in the room." This is a slender thread on which to hang an entire novel, but Lowry spins interesting variations on her theme, and the book ends with a swell (and well-prepared) surprise. Sam remains every middle-grader's little brother; parents, too, will be amused.
Horn Book

"For Future Job Day' at Sam Krupnik's nursery school, the four-year-olds have been instructed to dress up as representatives of their desired profession. Sam doesn't want to be a fireman, as do all the other boys in his class. Instead he wants to be somebody important, somebody interesting, somebody more than ordinary,' a secret concept he privately and quite marvelously dubs the Chief of Wonderfulness.' With the assistance of his impossibly even-tempered mother and ever-helpful sister, Anastasia, Sam dresses up in a spiffy homemade zookeeper's costume. Sam's teacher allows Sam to tell his class about a different zoo animal every day, a privilege that he finds both thrilling and challenging. The plotting is leisurely, the story is slender, and a subplot about the training of the family dog barely registers. This cast of familiar characters isn't as vibrant as usual, and the material runs out of steam before the novel ends. Fans of the Sam books may find satisfaction in the nicely foreshadowed but still unanticipated punch line." Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440416760
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
03/13/2001
Series:
Sam Krupnik Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
532,495
Product dimensions:
5.29(w) x 7.59(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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