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The Zope Book
     

The Zope Book

by Amos Latteier, Michel Pelletier, Michel Pellatier (Joint Author)
 

The Zope Book, written by the experts who developed Zope, is a guide to building dynamic Web applications using Zope. Authors Amos Latteier and Michel Pelletier teach you how to utilize Zope to write Web pages, program Web scripts, use databases, manage dynamic content, perform collaborative Web development tasks, plus much more. Whether you are new to Zope or are

Overview

The Zope Book, written by the experts who developed Zope, is a guide to building dynamic Web applications using Zope. Authors Amos Latteier and Michel Pelletier teach you how to utilize Zope to write Web pages, program Web scripts, use databases, manage dynamic content, perform collaborative Web development tasks, plus much more. Whether you are new to Zope or are a skilled user, this current and comprehensive reference is designed to introduce you to Zope and its uses and teaches you how it differs from other Web application servers. From installation and advanced features, such as ZClasses, to using Zope with relational databases, or scripting with Perl and Python, The Zope Book provides the instruction you need.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735711372
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
07/31/2001
Series:
Landmark Series
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 2: Using Zope

This chapter gets you up and running with Zope. It guides you through installing and running Zope and covers the most important Zope concepts. By the end of this chapter, you should be able to use Zope to create and manage simple, yet powerful, Web applications.

Downloading Zope

The first steps to using Zope are to download and install it. Zope is available for free from the Zope.org Web site. (http://www.zope.org). The most recent stable version is always avalable from the download section at Zope.org. (http://www.zope.org/Products).

Zope is currently available as a binary for Windows, Linux, and Solaris. This means that you can just download and install it without having to compile any programs. For other platforms, you must download the source and compile Zope. Zope can be compiled and run on almost any UNIX-like operating system. As a general rule of thumb, if Python is available for your operating system and you have a C compiler, then you can probably use Zope.

Installing Zope

You will install Zope differently, depending on your platform. If you are running a recent version of Linux, you might already have Zope installed.You can get Zope in both binary and source forms. Several different binary formats are also available.

Installing Zope for Windows

Zope for Windows comes as a self-installing .exe file. To install Zope, double-click the .exe file. This launches an Installer that walks you through the installation process. Pick a name for your Zope installation and a directory in which to install it. Click Next, and create a new Zope user account. This account is called the initial user account. This creates an account that you can use to log into Zope for the first time. You can change this username and password later if you want.

If you are using Windows NT or Windows 2000, you can choose to run Zope as a service. Running Zope as a service is a good idea for a public server. If you are just running Zope for personal use, don't bother running it as a service. Keep in mind that if you are running Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows ME (Millenium Edition), you cannot run Zope as a service.

If you decide to uninstall Zope later, you can use the Unwise.exe program in your Zope directory.

Downloading Linux and Solaris Binaries

The following code shows how to download the binary for your platform and extract the tarball:

$ tar xvfz Zope-2.3.0-linux2-x86.tgz

In the previous example, you are downloading version 2.3.0.This might not be the most recent version of Zope when you read this, so be sure to get the latest stable version of Zope for your platform. The following code unpacks Zope into a new directory. Enter the Zope directory and run the Zope Installer script:

$ cd Zope-2.3.0-linux2-x86
$ ./install

The Installer prints information as it installs Zope. Among other things, it creates an Initial User account.You can change the initial username and password later with the zpasswd.py script (see Chapter 6, "Users and Security").

The Installer configures Zope to run as your UNIX userid. If you prefer to run Zope as another userid, you can use the -u command-line switch and specify the user you want to configure Zope to run as. Many books on the market contain more information on userids and UNIX administration; in general, you should check out userids and UNIX administration if you want to do anything fancy. For now, things will work fine if you just install Zope as your user by not specifying any extra command-line options.

For more information on installing Zope, see the installation instructions in doc/INSTALL.txt, and find out more about the Installer script by running it with the following -h help switch:

$ ./install -h

Getting Zope in RPM and deb Format

Zope Corporation doesn't make Zope available in RPM format, but other people do....

Meet the Author

Amos Latteier is a software engineer with Zope Corporation, the company that publishes Zope. He started hacking Python in the 1.3 days. He was one of the first users of Bobo, Zope's precursor. Using Bobo, he wrote Web applications for Hewlett Packard and others. Later he joined Zope Corporation and helped usher Zope into existence. Amos wrote most of Zope's initial networking and XML support. More recently, he developed training materials, wrote the online Help system, and wrote officially documentation and magazine articles about Zope. He is currently planning Zope's future directions. Michel Pelletier has been a software developer for Zope Corporation since January of 1999, right about the same time Zope became Open Source. Michel likes to hike, fly, read, drink beer, play his horns, and of coarse, hack in his favorite language, Python. Michel lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Before working for the Zope Corporation, Michel was self-employed in a number of jobs including freelance network engineer, waiter, software consultant, beer taster, sales associate, pizza restaurant manager, starving musician, dish washer, bum, Appalachian Trail thru-hiker, and college drop-out.

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