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Meet the WritersImage of William Trevor
William Trevor
Biography
"William Trevor is an extraordinarily mellifluous writer, seemingly incapable of composing an ungraceful sentence," Brooke Adams once wrote in the New York Times Book Review. Hailed by the New Yorker as "probably the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language," Trevor has also written over a dozen acclaimed novels as well as several plays. His characters are often people whose desires have been unfulfilled, and who come to rely on various forms of self-deception and fantasy to make their lives bearable.

Trevor was born in 1928 to a middle-class, Protestant family in Ireland. After graduating from Trinity College with a degree in history, he attempted to carve out a career as a sculptor. He moved to England in 1954 and exhibited his sculptures there; he also wrote his first novel, A Standard of Behavior, which was published in 1958 but met with little critical success. His second novel, The Old Boys, won the 1964 Hawthornden Prize for Literature and marked the beginning of a long and prolific career as a novelist, short-story writer and playwright.

Three of Trevor's novels have won the prestigious Whitbread Novel of the Year Award: The Children of Dynmouth, Fools of Fortune and Felicia's Journey. Felicia's Journey, about a pregnant Irish girl who goes to England to find the lover who abandoned her, was adapted for the screen in 1999 by director Atom Egoyan. Trevor, who has described himself as a short-story writer who enjoys writing novels, has also written such celebrated short stories as "Three People," in which a woman who murdered her disabled sister harbors an unspoken longing for the man who provided her with an alibi, and "The Mourning," about a young man who is pressed by political activists into planting a bomb (both from The Hill Bachelors).

Some critics have noted a change in Trevor's work over the years: his early stories tend to contain comic sketches of England, while his later ones describe Ireland with the elegiac tone of an expatriate. Trevor, who now lives in Devon, England, has suggested that he has something of an outsider's view of both countries. "I feel a sense of freshness when I come back [to Ireland]," he said in a 2000 Irish radio interview. "If I lived in, say, Dungarvan or Skibbereen, I think I wouldn't notice things."

As it stands, Trevor is clearly a writer who notices things, just as one of his characters notices "the glen and the woods and the seashore, the flat rocks where the shrimp pools were, the room she woke up in, the chatter of the hens in the yard, the gobbling of the turkeys, her footsteps the first marks on the sand when she walked to Kilauran to school" (The Story of Lucy Gault). Yet as Trevor told an interviewer for The Irish Times, "You mustn't write about what you know. You must use your imagination. Fiction is an act of the imagination." Trevor's fertile imagination captures, as Alice McDermott wrote in The Atlantic, "the terrible beauty of Ireland's fate, and the fate of us all -- at the mercy of history, circumstance, and the vicissitudes of time."   (Gloria Mitchell)

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Good to Know
When Trevor was growing up, he wanted to be a clerk in the Bank of Ireland -- following in the footsteps of his father, James William Cox. Cox's career as a bank manager took the family all over Ireland, and Trevor attended over a dozen different schools before entering Trinity College in Dublin.

Trevor married his college sweetheart, Jane Ryan, in 1952. After the birth of their first son, Trevor worked for a time as an advertising copywriter in London. He also sculpted and worked as an art teacher, but gave up his sculpting after it became "too abstract."

In addition to the 1999 film Felicia's Journey, two other movies have been based on Trevor's works: Fools of Fortune (1990), directed by Pat O'Connor, and Attracta (1983), directed by Kieran Hickey. According to Trevor's agent, the plays Reading Turgenev and My House in Umbria are also being adapted for the screen.

Trevor is also the author of several plays, most of which are not in print in the U.S. Works include Scenes from an Album, Marriages, and Autumn Sunshine.

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About the Writer
*William Trevor Home
* Biography
* Good to Know
In Our Other Stores
*William Trevor Movies
Chronology
*The Old Boys, 1964
*The Boarding House, 1965
*The Love Department, 1966
*Mrs. Eckdorf in O'Neill's Hotel, 1969
*Miss Gomez and the Brethren, 1971
*Ballroom of Romance and Other Stories, 1972
*Elizabeth Alone, 1973
*Angels at the Ritz and Other Stories, 1975
*The Children of Dynmouth, 1976
*Lovers of Their Time and Other Stories, 1978
*Other People's Worlds, 1980
*Beyond the Pale and Other Stories, 1981
*The Stories of William Trevor, 1983
*Fools of Fortune, 1983
*A Writer's Ireland: Landscape in Literature, 1984
*The News from Ireland, 1985
*Nights at the Alexandra, 1987
*The Silence in the Garden, 1988
*Family Sins and Other Stories, 1990
*Two Lives: Reading Turgenev and My House in Umbria (novellas), 1991
*Juliet's Story, 1991
*The Collected Stories, 1992
*Excursions in the Real World: Memoirs, 1993
*Felicia's Journey, 1994
*Outside Ireland: Selected Stories, 1995
*After Rain: Stories, 1996
*Death in Summer, 1998
*Ireland: Selected Stories, 1998
*The Hill Bachelors (stories), 2000
*The Story of Lucy Gault, 2002
Photo by Jerry Bauer