Browse Meet the Writers
 
Writers A-Z

Writers by Genre
  Featured Writers  
 
Children's Writers & Illustrators

Classic Writers

Mystery & Thriller Writers

Romance Writers
 
  Special Features  
 
Author Recommendations

Audio Interviews

Video Interviews

The Writers of 2006
 
Award Winners
 
Discover Great New Writers

National Book Award Fiction Writers

National Book Award Nonfiction Writers
 
Find a Store
 
Enter ZIP Code
Easy Returns
to any Barnes &
Noble store.
Meet the WritersImage of Mordicai Gerstein
Mordicai Gerstein
Biography
Mordicai Gerstein has always been an artist. As a child, he enjoyed painting and eventually graduated from art school in Los Angeles. He continued painting in New York City and supported himself and his family for 25 years by designing and directing animated television commercials. He says, "I had always loved cartoons, especially Bugs Bunny, and I found I enjoyed making animated films. Even a 30-second commercial involved drawing and painting, storytelling, not to mention actors, music, and sound effects."

During the 1960s, Gerstein made several films that received critical acclaim. In 1966, The Room won the Award of the Film Clubs of France at the International Festival for Experimental Film, and in 1968, The Magic Ring won a CINE Golden Eagle.

His career took a dramatic turn when he met children's author Elizabeth Levy in 1970. He has illustrated her Something Queer Is Going On chapter books ever since, and it was Levy and her editor who encouraged Gerstein to write a book on his own. His debut came in 1983 with Arnold of the Ducks, the story of a young boy who gets lost in the wild and is raised by ducks. The New York Times hailed Gerstein's freshman effort as one of the year's best children's books, and he went on to write two more volumes exploring the theme of feral childhood. In 1998 he released The Wild Boy, a picture book based on the true story of a young 18th-century French boy who was found living in the woods and was put on display as an oddity, only to escape and be captured again years later. That same year, Gerstein released Victor, a young adult novel about the same boy.

Gerstein tells the story is of a Tibetan woodcutter who is given a choice between reincarnation or heaven in The Mountains of Tibet, which received the distinction of being one of 1987's ten best illustrated books of the year, according to The New York Times. Although the book is written for kids around age seven, Gerstein approaches the subject of death with a bold, sensitive plot and elegant illustrations. Spirituality is a major theme in many of Gerstein's books. He has interpreted tales from the Bible in Jonah and the Two Great Fish (1997), Noah and the Great Flood (1999), and Queen Esther the Morning Star (2001). Other titles such as The Seal Mother (1986), The Story of May (1993), and The Shadow of a Flying Bird (1994) also express Gerstein's reverential awe for the world.

Young readers can also stretch their imaginations with Gerstein's more playful books. Vocabulary is fun in The Absolutely Awful Alphabet (1999), where the letter P is actually a particularly putrid predator! Bedtime Everybody! (1996) has a young girl's stuffed animals planning a bedtime picnic. Behind the Couch (1996) takes readers on an exciting caper into an unknown world of grazing dust balls, Lost Coin Hill and the Valley of the Stuffed Animals. In Stop Those Pants (1998), a boy is forced to play hide-and-seek with his clothes as he gets ready for the day. Gerstein pays tribute to American composer Charles Ives in What Charlie Heard (2002), the story of a boy's unique talent for interpreting all the sounds of daily life.

Another biographical picture book, The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (2003) tells the story of Philippe Petit, the daredevil who walked across a tightrope suspended between New York City's World Trade Center towers in 1974. The book won the Caldecott Medal in 2004, and parents have praised the book as an invaluable tool for talking to their children about the events of 9/11.

Many of Gerstein's children's books are destined to be classics. His style of writing and illustration brings each of his stories to life, shows a passion for adventure, and relishes the joy that comes from understanding the mysteries of the world.

  (Jessica Dukes)

*Back to Top
Good to Know
Despite a successful career illustrating children's books, the first book Gerstein wrote, Arnold of the Ducks, was turned down by seven publishers. Eventually, The New York Times called it one of the best children's books of the year.

Gerstein was inspired to write The Mountains of Tibet after reading The Tibetan Book of the Dead.



*Back to Top

About the Writer
*Mordicai Gerstein Home
* Biography
* Good to Know
In Our Other Stores
* Signed, First Editions by Mordicai Gerstein
Chronology
*Arnold of the Ducks, 1983
*Follow Me!, 1983
*Prince Sparrow, 1984
*Roll Over!, 1984
*The Room, 1985
*Tales of Pan, 1986
*Seal Mother, 1986
*The Mountains of Tibet, 1987
*William, Where Are You?, 1989
*Beauty and the Beast, 1989
*The Sun's Day, 1989
*Anytime Mapleson and the Hungry Bears, 1990
*New Creatures, 1991
*The Story of May, 1993
*The Shadow of a Flying Bird, 1994
*The Giant, 1995
*Daisy's Garden, 1995
*Behind the Couch, 1996
*Bedtime, Everybody!, 1996
*Jonah and the Two Great Fish, 1997
*Stop Those Pants!, 1998
*The Wild Boy, 1998
*Victor: A Novel Based on the Life of Victor, the Savage of Aveyron, 1998
*Noah and the Great Flood, 1999
*The Absolutely Awful Alphabet, 1999
*Fox Eyes, 2001
*Queen Esther, the Morning Star, 2001
*What Charlie Heard, 2002
*The Man Who Walked Between the Towers, 2003
*Sparrow Jack, 2003