June’s Best New Thrillers

This month’s best thrillers include a new story featuring genius FBI agent Emily Dockery from James Patterson and David Ellis, the latest globe-trotting Scot Harvath twister from Brad Thor, and the newest brain-bending work from Blake Crouch.

Unsolved, by James Patterson and David Ellis
James Patterson and David Ellis delivery the sequel to Invisible, which introduced the obsessive, genius FBI researcher Emily Dockery. Emily notices things others miss, and it has made her reputation in the bureau. Now, she’s seeing a string of murders across the country—deaths that appear to be accidental, and which seem to have no connection to one another. Whoever’s orchestrating them seems to know what Emily is thinking, and keeps one step ahead of her as she works the case hard. Meanwhile, Emily’s ex-fiancee and reluctant partner, Special Agent Harrison “Books” Bookman, suspects treason within the Bureau—and hasn’t ruled out Emily herself as the culprit.

Backlash, by Brad Thor
The 18th Scot Harvath novel finds the legendary operative in the most desperate position of his life. Harvath is a dangerous man; a former Navy SEAL who graduated from a stint in the Secret Service to leading the top secret Apex Project. He’s charged with defending his country by any means necessary, and over the course of 17 books he’s proved he’s a patriot—and he’s a bad person to cross. The lone survivor of an attack that downs his plane behind enemy lines, with no support or equipment, Harvath must find a way to survive using just his brains and his experience as he claws his way to getting revenge on those who would dare attack everything he loves. This white-knuckle adventure will please longtime Harvath fans and introduce new readers to one of the best thriller characters around.

Tom Clancy: Enemy Contact, by Mike Maden
Jack Ryan Jr. continues to honor his father’s legacy in his latest tense political adventure. Someone’s selling out the CIA, auctioning its deepest secrets to the highest bidder and destabilizing the entire intelligence system of the Western world. After barely surviving a disastrous mission in Poland, Jack Jr. is called to the bedside of a friend dying of cancer and asked for one final favor: to scatter the man’s ashes on a specific hillside in Chile. Jack agrees, thinking it simply as a way to honor a friend—but he’s almost immediately contacted by a former army ranger and warned not to go through with it. Ever his father’s son, Jack does anyway, setting off a chain of events that leaves him isolated, in grave danger, and within spitting distance of discovering the identity of the mole in the CIA.

Skin Game, by Stuart Woods and Parnell Hall
Stuart Woods and co-writer Parnell Hall’s Teddy Faye returns. The ex-CIA agent is ordered by the agency’s chief to drop everything and head to Paris in order to ferret out a mole. Faye obeys, attracting the attention of Fahd Kassin, a Syrian tough with a penchant for assassination. Teddy reaches Paris, but before he can begin his investigation he finds himself going undercover to track Kassin, who has arrived in the city to attend a rare animal convention. As Teddy gets the better of his enemies in increasingly entertaining ways, he stumbles onto a plot that threatens more than just one ex-CIA operative.

Recursion, by Blake Crouch
At the start of Blake Crouch’s latest mind-bending high-concept sci-fi thriller, New York City detective Barry Sutton begins to encounter people suffering from False Memory Syndrome—a condition where they “remember” lives they never lived, and suffer emotionally due to tragedies they never actually experienced. A year earlier, a brilliant neuroscientist named Helena Smith accepts funding from a mega-wealthy sponsor in order to create a device that can preserve memories to be re-experienced whenever desired—but it also allows people to literally enter those memories, changing everything. As the disorder spreads throughout the city, reality itself is threatened; who can say what is real when you can’t trust your own memories? As Harry connects with Helena and they realize her research is destabilizing the world, the two join forces to find a way to save the human race from this threat from within.

The Last House Guest, by Megan Miranda
Littleport, Maine is the sort of town where life is split down the middle between the summer tourists and the year-round residents who serve their wealthier part-time neighbors. The divide is so strong that the friendship that springs up between visiting Sadie Loman and townie Avery Greer is remarkable, both for its authenticity and its longevity—every year Sadie visits with her family, and for the summer, she and Avery are a team. Until the summer Sadie turns up dead. Her death is officially ruled a suicide, but Avery can’t accept that—and the more she digs into her friend’s death, the more convinced she is that she shouldn’t, as forces in the community seem to be arrayed against her lonely quest for the truth.

What books look thrilling to you in June?

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