Revealing The Name of All Things, the Next Verse of Jenn Lyons’ A Chorus of Dragons

Last month saw the release of The Ruin of Kings, the debut novel from Jenn Lyons, and the first volume of an ambitious five-book fantasy series known as A Chorus of Dragons. With an inventive narrative structure and ample use of footnotes, it more than satisfied our expectations, built sky high by advance buzz that likened it to A Song of Ice and Fire and The Kingkiller Chronicle.

While Lynons’ series promises to be as epic as either of those lauded sagas, she is definitely doing her own thing—and the books differ in another way as well: Tor is committed to cranking then out on an accelerated schedule, one every nine months or so. Which means that volume two, The Name of All Things, lands before the end of the year—and today, were giving you your first taste of the sequel, via a cover reveal and excerpt.

Find both below the official summary. The Name of All Things arrives October 29.

You can have everything you want if you sacrifice everything you believe. 

Kihrin D’Mon is a wanted man.

Since he destroyed the Stone of Shackles and set demons free across Quur, he has been on the run from the wrath of an entire empire. His attempt to escape brings him into the path of Janel Theranon, a mysterious Joratese woman who claims to know Kihrin. 

Janel’s plea for help pits Kihrin against all manner of dangers: a secret rebellion, a dragon capable of destroying an entire city, and Kihrin’s old enemy, the wizard Relos Var.

Janel believes that Relos Var possesses one of the most powerful artifacts in the world—the Cornerstone called the Name of All Things. And if Janel is right, then there may be nothing in the world that can stop Relos Var from getting what he wants. 

And what he wants is Kihrin D’Mon.

Art by Lars Grant-West

An excerpt from The Name of All Things follows…

“Fine. You’ve gone through a lot of effort to find me.” He looked Janel in the eyes. “Why?”

She answered, “We need your help to slay a dragon.”

Kihrin blinked at her.

“A dragon? A dragon?

Janel blushed. “Please lower your voice.”

“A dragon,” Kihrin repeated a third time. “Do you have any clue—? No, wait. Look, I applaud your ambition or greed or whatever reason you have for thinking this is a good idea. Let me assure you—this is a terrible idea.”

“It matters not if it is or it isn’t—”

“No. I’m sorry. ‘Let’s go kill a dragon’ ranks among the worst of ideas. It’s right above invading the Manol in summer and right below freeing Vol Karoth ‘just for a little while.’ Do you know why parents don’t warn their children not to attack dragons? Because no parent wants to think their kids are that stupid. A dragon would annihilate me before I got close enough to hurt its feelings, let alone do any real damage to it.”

Janel raised an eyebrow at Kihrin. “Are you quite finished?”

“No,” Kihrin said. “I want to know who told you to enlist me into this ludicrous scheme, so I can find that person and shove my—”

“A quarter million people are currently in Atrine,” Janel interrupted. “And they have no idea they’re about to be attacked by the largest dragon ever known.”

That stopped him cold. He ignored the bartender—doing double duty as waitstaff—as she shoved another mug of cider onto the table. She followed that with a bowl of rice and vegetables covered in a thick paste. Without asking if anyone needed anything else, she retreated to the bar.

Kihrin pushed aside the food. “What?”

Musicians and storytellers in the Capital loved to talk about Atrine. What wasn’t to love? Atrine was a literally magical city, crafted of poetry and marble, built by Emperor Atrin Kandor in a single day. Ironically, Kihrin had never met anyone who’d actually been there; it was everyone’s favorite city from a distance.

“You heard me quite well,” Janel said, no longer smiling. “Now, as decided to recruit you for this plan, just what, pray tell, are you planning to shove, and where? Would you care to elaborate?”

Kihrin turned red. He exhaled and turned to the priest. “How are you involved in this?”

“Oh, I’m uh . . .” Qown floundered. “I used to be . . . that is to say . . .” He scowled, flustered. “It’s complicated,” he finished.

“As Qown mentioned earlier, he’s a votary of the Vishai Mysteries,” Janel said. “He’s also a qualified physicker and my best friend.”

Qown looked uncomfortable. Kihrin wondered what part of Janel’s description had upset the priest—his religion or his status as a Royal House licensed healer. Being called dearest friend hadn’t bothered him earlier.

“And you’re fine with this ‘Let’s go kill a dragon’ plan? Because you don’t strike me as the type to throw away your life.”

“With all respect,” Qown replied, “my approval or disapproval is irrelevant. Once Morios surfaces from underneath Lake Jorat, he’ll attack Atrine. Thousands will die. Normally, the Emperor would handle the problem, or the Eight Immortals themselves, but Emperor Sandus is dead, and the gods . . .” He held out his hands.

“The gods are busy battling demons,” Janel finished.

Preorder The Name of All Things, available October 29, 2019.

Follow B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy