Do More Faster: Techstars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup

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by Brad Feld, David B. Cohen

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781119583288
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 07/11/2019
Edition description: 2nd ed.
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 1,139,985
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

About TechStars.

The Seven Themes You Must Master.

Theme 1: Idea and Vision.

Trust Me, Your Idea is Worthless.

Start With Your Passion.

Look for the Pain.

Get Feedback Early.

Usage is Like Oxygen for Ideas.

Forget the Kitchen Sink.

Find That One Thing They Love.

Don't Plan. Prototype!

You Never Need another Original Idea.

Get It Out There.

Avoid Tunnel Vision.

Focus.

Iterate Again.

Fail Fast.

Pull the Plug When You Know It's Time.

Theme 2: People.

Don't Go It Alone.

Avoid Co-Founder Conflict.

Hire People Better Than You.

Hire Slowly, Fire Quickly.

If You Can Quit, You Should.

Build a Balanced Team.

Startups Seek Friends.

Engage Great Mentors.

Define Your Culture.

Two Strikes and You Are Out.

Karma Matters.

Be Open to Randomness.

Theme 3: Execution.

Do More Faster.

Assume That You're Wrong.

Make Decisions Quickly.

It's Just Data.

Use Your Head, Then Trust Your Gut.

Progress Equals Validated Learning.

The Plural of Anecdote is Not Data.

Don't Suck at Email

Use What's Free.

Be Tiny Until You Shouldn't Be.

Don't Celebrate the Wrong Things.

Release at a Specific Time.

Learn From Your Failures.

Quality Over Quantity.

Have a Bias Towards Action.

Do or Do Not, There is No Try.

Theme 4: Product.

Don't Wait Until You Are Proud of Your Product.

Find Your Whitespace.

Focus on What Matters.

Obsess Over Metrics.

Avoid Distractions.

Know Your Customer.

Beware the Big Companies.

Throw Things Away.

Pivot.

Theme 5: Fundraising.

You Don't Have To Raise Money.

There's More Than One Way To Raise Money.

Don't Forget About Bootstrapping.

Beware of Angel Investors Who Aren't.

Seed Investors Care About Three Things.

Practice Like You Play.

If You Want Money, Ask for Advice.

Show, Don't Tell.

Turn the Knife After You Stick It In.

Don't Over Optimize On Valuations.

Get Help With Your Term Sheet.

Focus On The First One-Third.

Theme 6: Legal and Structure.

Form the Company Early.

Choose the Right Company Structure.

Default to Delaware.

Lawyers Don't Have To Be Expensive.

Vesting Is Good For You.

Your Brother-in-Law is Probably Not the Right Corporate Lawyer.

To 83(b) Or Not To 83(b), There Is No Question.

Theme 7: Work/Life Balance.

Discover Work Life Balance.

Practice Your Passion.

Follow Your Heart.

Turn Work into Play.

Get Out From Behind Your Computer.

Stay Healthy.

Get Away From It All.

The Evolution of TechStars.

What Motivated Me To Start TechStars?

Why TechStars Started in Boulder.

How TechStars Came to Boston.

How TechStars Came to Seattle.

So You Want To Start TechStars In Your City?

Appendix A: The TechStars Companies.

About the Authors.

Acknowledgements.

Index.

Customer Reviews

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Do More Faster: TechStars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
rightantler on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you are looking at a single source of current thinking on entrepreneurship this is a reasonable place to start. The book has bite-size pieces arranged in helpful groups that make it easy to digest. However, talking too many bites at once can reduce enjoyment. There are many books on entrepreneurship, this is one of the better ones.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Impirus More than 1 year ago
Brad Feld and David Cohen have put together an excellent resource for entrepreneurs. I've worked for a startup and co-founded a startup and I can relate to many of the stories in the book. I appreciated the quote, "Startups are about testing theories and quickly pivoting based on feedback and data." That is so true. We are in the process of pivoting, right now. One thing that I read that holds particular significance for me is, "Get feedback early." If we would have gotten more feedback from our target market with Impirus, we might have chosen a different vertical. Here are some other truths in the book; 1) Focus on one thing and do it really well 2) Listen to customers 3) Focus on ease of use 4) Get external accountability. We have implemented those ideas with success. I think that everyone who is going to start a business, or who has already started one will appreciate this book.
sbell22 More than 1 year ago
Brad Feld and David Cohen have created a "must read" blockbuster for every aspiring tech entrepreneur. But it's a bit of a misnomer to attribute this seminal entry into entrepreneurship literature, to these two guys. Because Feld and Cohen have turned web 2.0 "crowd-sourcing" on themselves, and used it to create a terrific, wide-ranging collection of solid advice and insights for aspiring tech entrepreneurs. What they've done is, publish the collective wisdom of their entrepreneurial network - based in Boulder - but now reaching out to Boston, Seattle, NYC, (and who knows where, next) - to aspire every young tech entrepreneur - even if those entrepreneurs don't have "tech experience". This ground-breaking book is jam-packed with wisdom, solid advice, and great insights. I recommend every new tech startup team - whether they are a young, first-time startup team, or not - make a detailed study of the wealth of great advice and insights, contained in this book. All you need, according to Feld & Cohen - is the right "heart" - not necessarily including technical experience. Is this going to be a "hot book"? Only the wizards of the publishing industry know, for sure. If you're fascinated by entrepreneurship - what to do, and what NOT to do - then read this book, and enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great to get a general idea of what tech entrepreneurs go through. I must say the book is lacking in depth. Without white space and photos this would be probably not more than 100 pages. This would be a good first read. If you want more depth check out 'the 4 hour work week' (2nd edition) or a whole lotta depth check out 'Lean Startup' by Eric Ries.