Red: A Crayon's Story

4.6 7 5 1
by Michael Hall

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062252074
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 02/03/2015
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 40,910
Product dimensions: 8.40(w) x 11.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Michael Hall grew up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where autumn was memorable for football, floats, caramel apples, and spectacular colors. He is the creator of several acclaimed picture books for children, including  Frankencrayon, Red: A Crayon’s Story, My Heart Is Like a Zoo, Perfect Square, and It’s an Orange Aardvark! Michael Hall now lives with his family in Minneapolis, Minnesota—another city that shimmers in the fall.


Michael Hall grew up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where autumn was memorable for football, floats, caramel apples, and spectacular colors. He is the creator of several acclaimed picture books for children, including  Frankencrayon, Red: A Crayon’s Story, My Heart Is Like a Zoo, Perfect Square, and It’s an Orange Aardvark! Michael Hall now lives with his family in Minneapolis, Minnesota—another city that shimmers in the fall.

Customer Reviews

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Red: A Crayon's Story 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
BSUTeacherinTraining More than 1 year ago
This story brought me to tears. What with everything people have been saying/doing that is anti-transgender, anti-LGBT, anti-anyone different than “me”, this book is a light in the dark. And it isn’t just a story to help children who may be trans. This story can help children overcoming powerful stereotypes based on their gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, class, and/or family situation. Any child can relate to the feeling that who people want them to be is often not who they are. All it takes is one kind individual to see your potential to set you on a path to being strong and confident, and the one and only true version of yourself. It is books and messages like this that I want to encourage and push for in the classroom, books that teach real life lessons with the use of simple images, simple words, and simple themes that aid in the profound expectations of life. I believe some adults should read this book and think to themselves: am i being the naysayers, or the magenta crayon? Because, in our hearts we all know we should be the magenta crayon. As a teacher, I want to be that crayon that sees who “Red” truly is and lets them be themselves. Now, in real life the naysayers don’t fully stop when someone else steps up for a person, however this story can show children the change that the voice in their head can make when they accept themselves despite what others may say, and to never give up trying to be your best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its easy to.see where this book is going. However the problem is reversed. The crayon was in fact never blue. It eas always red. The crayon was was unhapoy because it was mislabeled, it was create dto be blue, never red, no matter what external dressing where put upon it or how blue looked red on th eoutside, it was never red.
BetzyMama More than 1 year ago
My toddler loves this book so much she sleeps with it. She can quotes some of the crayons and loves to point out all the different colors. I love this book about using labels to judge a ....crayon.
quibecca More than 1 year ago
I know I have said this before, but I LOVE children's books. They just make me happy. I love going to the store and finding new ones each time I go. This is such a sweet story about about how to love yourself no matter who or what you are. Red crayon cannot seem to color right. His label says he is red, but when ever he tries to do anything it turns out blue. Everyone tries to help him be red, but no amount of coaxing will help him be red. When red finds a new friend, his new friend helps him understand that he was never red to begin with. He was indeed blue. Such a sweet book. It didn't matter to his friends what color he was, they all just wanted him to be happy.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
Why I liked this book- This seems the ultimate “be yourself” book. It shows that if you just judge by appearance, you can get an entirely different outlook than on what’s inside the “wrapper”. The illustrations are quirky and fun to look at. I like how the white page is really “paper” for the crayons to draw on. That was pretty cool. This is a wonderful book, and I was happy to review it. “Red” is a nice crayon who you care for. There is some humor in the story, because the reader instantly knows that Red is blue. This is a nice book for diversity teaching. *NOTE* I got a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
tapestry100 More than 1 year ago
A blue crayon, mistakenly labeled red, has a hard time of things as he is constantly bombarded by others to be red: his teachers try to get Red to draw strawberries; Red's mother sends him on a playdate with a yellow crayon and tries to convince him to draw an orange with her; the scissors trim his label down, thinking maybe it's too tight. Yet no matter how hard he tries, Red simply cannot be anything other than what he is: blue. Finally, through a new friend who see's him for what he really is, Red finally accepts his blue self and learns to love himself despite the label that others think he should be following.  A charming, clever tale letting kids know that it's ok to be who you are, despite what others say, Michael Hall's Red: A Crayon's Story is a story that adults can enjoy just as much as kids will.
crpeachy More than 1 year ago
Red is the story of a mislabeled crayon, whose blue stem is covered by a red paper wrapper. Told from the perspective of a pencil, his other crayon family members or crayon friends are puzzled and cannot see beyond his factory label. He tries to draw strawberries, cherries and other red objects, but nothing comes out right. His new friend challenges Red to make a new attempt at a blue sea. Finally, Red meets with success. The reader can sense the frustration of being misunderstood. One wants to cheer when Red finds his true talent.