Annapurna: The First Conquest of an 8,000-Meter Peak

Annapurna: The First Conquest of an 8,000-Meter Peak

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Annapurna: The First Conquest of an 8,000-Meter Peak 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Understated incredible effort. Well told, gripping and informative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is captivating. Anyone looking for a classic adventure told from the perspective of people venturing into the truly unknown, look no farther.
SuburbanMountaineer More than 1 year ago
This is the classic account of the first ascent of an 8,000 meter peak. The book was translated from its original French version. Be inspired by it but take with a grain of salt. Then read David Roberts book True Summit to clear up some issues. Regardless, the positive impact that the expedition and the book has had on mountaineers is undeniable. It inspired Ed Viesturs to start climbing when he was just a kid and hundreds of others no doubt.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Five Stars
cwflatt on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the greatest early mountaineering adventures. Wonderful to story of brave and accomplishment at the top of the world
Daniel.Estes on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The tale of the first ascent of Annapurna in the Himalayan mountains is as classic as it is fraught with problems. The journey took place in mid-1950 by a team of skilled Frenchmen led by Maurice Herzog who was the expedition leader, and climbing Annapurna would be the first 8,000 meter summit in history and therefore the highest peak reached to date. (Note: Mount Everest would not be summited until 1953 - three years later.)The account is told from the perspective of the leader and the book's author, Herzog, and details the often routine and dangerous life of mountaineering pioneers in the mid-20th century. Their first objective was to scout out and attempt to scale another eight-thousander, Dhaulagiri, which stood at 8,167 meters. When that mountain proved too difficult and their time running out ahead of the monsoon season, they chose Annapurna, which stood equally formidable at 8,091 meters. Once the team located the best path up the mountain they hurriedly set about establishing the camps and making progress. The summit would be theirs, but not without considerable cost to their health and parts of their bodies succumbing to frostbite. The journey down would be agonizing for those in dire need and most affected by the elements.My first problem with this book is the writing. Part of that is probably because it's been translated from French fifty years ago and part is probably because I am not a mountaineer and Annapurna was written by one. This story is for those who understand the heart of a climber; others will find it particularly self-absorbed. Another problem with this account, according to other reviewers, is that it is somewhat propaganda and not a true telling of what really happened. Herzog and Lachenal did reach the summit, but not necessarily in the heroic manner depicted in this book.Annapurna is classic reading in the mountaineering genre, but that's probably because it was one of the first of its kind. It's status represents what it stands for and not what it says.
RoaldEuller on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Utterly riveted, I stayed up until the wee hours reading this when I was about 15 years old. It sparked a lifelong interest in mountaineering books.
ianw on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A well told story of Herzog's epic ascent of Annapurna (and his even more epic descent).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome story, well written
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This was not the first book I ever read about mountain climbing, just the best. I've read several Everest accounts, up to and including the '96 tragedy, but none of them can hold a candle to the overwhelming adventure these frenchmen were on. First of all, they didn't even know which mountain they were going to climb; initially it was supposed to be Dhaulagiri - which they had to locate due to out of date maps. Once they found it, they realized it was beyond them at that time. So, then they had to locate Annapurna, again due to out of date maps. Suffice it to say you will shiver in sympathy as the rest of the adventure unfolds. (You didn't think I was going to give it all away did you?)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Maurice tells a great story of his amazing expedition to the top of Annapurna. I enjoyed comparing their adventure to recent modern expeditions to other high mountains, such as Everest. Modern climbers have much better equipment and support to help their chances of success. We should all respect the hardships that earlier climbers had to endure on their journeys. The only thing I downgrade the book on is that I thought it rambled on with more detail about mundane events than was necessary - it could have been shortened without sacrificing the thrust of the story. It is a very good story for all mountaineering and adventure fans to read.