Bloody Genius (Virgil Flowers Series #12)

Bloody Genius (Virgil Flowers Series #12)

by John Sandford

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Bloody Genius 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous 12 days ago
It took too long to get exciting. I enjoy the f-in flowers stories where your heart drops and you think to yourself, oh no! Here we go. And you get to go on a pulse pounding ride from mid book to the end.
Anonymous 7 days ago
John Sanford has crafted another "I couldn't put it down." novel. I think I'm fairly good at navigating the terrain in a Sanford story and coming up with a reasonable conclusion to the inherent mystery, but "Bloody Genius" had me stumped. My suspicions all turned into wispy smoke and merged in outright confusion. There were so many clues that I was as lost as Virgil was. I thought I was better than that. I really enjoy the repartee and wit Sanford uses in his dialogue. It never fails to bring a smile or a chuckle as I read. Though John has written a plethora of Davenport and Flowers books, I'd like to see him take another shot at Joe Kidd. He's an immensely complicated character and I've missed him. Mr. Sanford you keep on writing them and I'll keep on reading them.
diane92345 9 days ago
Virgil Flowers is back! His girlfriend Frankie is very pregnant with twins. He doesn’t appreciate having to bring in the hay on her farm. And, oh, he’s investigating a murder of a venerated Professor who likes to argue. The Professor is a genius who has been hit in the head—a Bloody Genius, get it? The change of setting allows Virgil to be a fish out of water at the University of Minnesota. The reader shares his surprise about how seriously academics take small issues. Could one of the scuff-ups have led to the Professor’s murder? Or could it be his three former wives, his girlfriends, his estranged daughter, his drug dealing, his blackmailing, or something else? Truly, this guy is a winner! I love that F*cking Flowers. His story is the best part of Bloody Genius. I also liked the pairing of Virgil with a police officer who actually appreciates his help. The mystery was good too. I totally missed the “hidden-in-plain-sight” clue that unravels the case. I like that in a book so I get to be as surprised as the author intended but can clearly see the hints in hindsight. If you like humorous police procedurals that use as little actual procedure as possible, you too will love that effing Flowers. 5 stars! Thanks to G.P. Putnam’s Sons and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
Anonymous 13 days ago
slow moving plot, unlikable characters. repetition of dialogue. same phrases appear in numerous chapters.
Anonymous 4 hours ago
it was different, kept me up late to finish reading it. I had no idea who done it not the usual Virgil flowers novel. you are letting him grow up. I like all of the flowers and Davenport books.
Anonymous 1 days ago
Typical John Sanford. Interesting and hard to put down. Love Virgil Flowers.
Anonymous 1 days ago
“Bloody Genius “ is the latest in the Virgil Flowers series, but I felt it was one of the weakest books. The plot fell a little flat, and most “gamers” probably wiil figure out the connection very early on. Compared to other books in this series, the action is a little tame, as the author has toned down the violence a bit. That being said, it’s still an interesting novel, and for fans of the series, like myself, it won’t matter much, as I still enjoy the characters, especially Flowers, and his methods, and I still eagerly await the next book. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through @NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
BookAddictFL 2 days ago
Virgil Flowers is one of my favorite characters, and this series is my go-to when I need a humorous diversion with a good mystery at its heart. If you've yet to meet Virgil, he's a brilliant investigator whose intelligence is often underestimated by both criminals and cops. He's a nonconformist, who refuses to dress as expected for a detective. He says what's on his mind and has a quick wit. We follow Virgil as he interviews suspects, works alongside local cops, and unravels the tangled mess to catch the killer. The plot borders on overly complex, which is the first time I've seen this happen in a Virgil Flowers novel. We have a whole lot of characters and moving parts, so keeping all the names and relationships straight can be a little daunting. Still, Sandford does a great job of keeping us oriented, and Virgil is always entertaining. This is the 12th book in the series, but each of them can be read as stand-alone novels. *I received a review copy from the publisher, via NetGalley.*
Anonymous 3 days ago
kk
Anonymous 5 days ago
loved it!
Anonymous 8 days ago
Loved it as always. Virgil's investigations always start a little slow, but always end with a big bang! Love that Fu**kin Flowers!I always picture Virgil as looking like actor Owen Wilson! Don't know why but it works for me!
Anonymous 9 days ago
Very disappointed-not up to his usual.
Anonymous 10 days ago
a little slow during the investigation process, but really delivers at the end
Anonymous 12 days ago
Another well written book from Stanford intricate plot with lots of twists
Anonymous 12 days ago
Bloody Genius is a great addition to the Virgil Flowers series. The intricate plot and fascinating characters kept me focused throughout the book. It is a very well written "who done it".
Anonymous 12 days ago
Loved it. I have read all the Prey books and all the Flowers books. Always 5 stars from me!
SarkuraCherryBlossom 13 days ago
43801724 Title: Bloody Genius Author : John Sandford Series :Virgil Flowers #12 Genre: thriller Publisher: Penguin Group Putnam Published: October 1,2019 Pages:384 My rating: Description: Virgil Flowers will have to watch his back--and his mouth--as he investigates a college culture war turned deadly in the latest thriller from #1 New York Times-bestseller John Sandford. At the local state university, two feuding departments have faced off on the battleground of PC culture. Each carries their views to extremes that may seem absurd, but highly educated people of sound mind and good intentions can reasonably disagree, right? Then someone winds up dead, and Virgil Flowers is brought in to investigate . . . and he soon comes to realize he's dealing with people who, on this one particular issue, are functionally crazy. Among this group of wildly impassioned, diametrically opposed zealots lurks a killer, and it will be up to Virgil to sort the murderer from the mere maniacs. My thoughts Would I recommend it ? Yes ( in fact as soon as I saw Netgalley had it to request I went and enabled my friend Shelleen to go and get it . Will I be going on with the series ?yes I will be Will I read anymore by this author? Yes I will be Another win for John Sandford and his book series because when ever I read one of them I get lost in the story and I just want to keep reading it until the last page, this was fast pace and not once did I want to put it down at all , with that said I want to thank Netgalley for letting me read and review it exchange for my honest opinion.
Anonymous 13 days ago
I really enjoy Sandford 's writing; this was excellent, as usual. Lots of plot twists!
MauCarden6 14 days ago
The Lothario, hunter, fisher, writer, photographer and ace investigator of the upper Midwest returns in Bloody Genius . The advent of girlfriend Frankie soon to be delivered of twins has kept him closer to home and has put paid to Virgil Flowers' roaming. Unfortunately, the position of being one of the governor’s golden haired boys (one sided as Virgil does not return the affection) still exists and results in the governor sending him to Minneapolis to solve a particularly vicious murder. Virgil, an investigator for the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, once inadvertently did the governor a great favor. No good deed goes unpunished and so Virgil has to put his boat up, avoid serious farm chores, and head to the Twin Cities. The victim is a wealthy, well-respected professor and brilliant researcher at the University of Minnesota. Virgil suspects it is the wealthy part that has attracted the Governor's attention. In two weeks, the well regarded MPD’s homicide unit has had no luck in solving the crime even though suspects abound; ex-wives, fellow researchers, students, a whole other university department and of course, the famous “some other guy”. Of course Virgil is warmly welcomed by MPD’s homicide unit, especially the lead detective, Margaret Trane whom the media has characterized as being ‘baffled’. No really, would I lie? Eventually Trane and Virgil come to an accommodation when she realizes Virgil does not want any credit for solving the case whereas Trane and her unit need the solve after the drumming they have received from the press. They quickly established an easy work relationship which is a change from the usual ‘competitive partnership until the last moment’ trope found in so many books. As Virgil pokes around he quickly makes a few discoveries that put the stalled investigation back into gear. I have always thought books with the easiest readability might be the hardest to write. Sandford excels as making his books rewarding with well thought out stories, some quirky characters and uncommon settings. Who ever thought the U of Minn. would be a great setting for a murder, except maybe for the students of the University of St Thomas? Virgil Flowers-nope not gonna say it-has long been known for his charm, his womanizing (formerly), his band tees and his astute insight into the men and women he meets, but his defining characteristic is his innate decency. Virgil must have demanded his own series from author John Sandford after being a part of the Lucas Davenport series. I don’t want to forget Virgil’s toughness. As easy-going as he can be, he is nobody’s fool and won’t be played for one. Now I’m going to spoil the gushing a bit by saying there was one distasteful moment when Virgil visualized a suspect’s “hair spread out on a pillow and her legs wrapped around his neck.” Just too jarring with Virgil in love with the mother of his twins; the woman he is planning to marry. Not to mention a very unprofessional view of a woman who might have committed a very brutal murder. I like that Virgil has no problem talking about his cases to people he meets. His smart view is that it is surprising the information or insights he gains. Toward the end of the book we are treated to Flowers trying to waffle out of admitting to an acquaintance that he was wrong about an important aspect of the investigation. Bloody Genius is a terrific continuation of the Virgil Flowers series. Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for a fair and ho
EileenHutton 14 days ago
The governor wants a favor for one of his donors: he asks Virgil Flowers to look into the unsolved murder of the donor’s husband. The victim was a highly respected, but not well liked professor and researcher at the university, who had his head bashed in after midnight in the school’s library. With no shortage of suspects with solid alibis, Virgil and homicide detective Traynor are led on one wild goose chase after another, until they finally find their killer. Filled with the cop humor we’ve come to expect from the Flowers novels, Bloody Genius is John Sandford at his best. Highly recommended.
Laura_F 14 days ago
I have been a fan of Virgil Flowers since he first showed up in the Prey series. He's funny, he's fierce, he draws all the ladies in. Bloody Genius started off very slow but once I hit 70%, it was like pedal to the metal suspense. There were a few too many people and subplots in this installment so I found myself skimming some parts to get to the good stuff. The best part of this book was Trane. I need her to show up in some more of Sandford's books because she. is. awesome!! As always, I love Virgil's humor and one-liners. I can't wait to see what kind of craziness he can get into next.
MonnieR 15 days ago
It's no secret that I love Bureau of Criminal Apprehension agent Virgil Flowers - he long ago earned a forever spot on my Top 10 list of favorite book heroes. But it's also no secret that I'm not thrilled that he's in a serious relationship with a woman - Frankie - who in fact is close to delivering a set of twins she and Virgil concocted seven months or so ago. Somehow, he'd turned into a kinder and mellower Virgil - and in the process lost a bit of the edge that endeared him to me. Well, after reading this, the 12th book in the series, I'd say he's still a little mellow and his language is, for the most part, more like a tricycle salesman than a truck driver. But overall, he's got that edge back - and for sure he's kept that irreverent sense of humor alive and well, as evidenced by my chuckles throughout, to-wit: "You know how to kill any earworm? You hum that Walt Disney thing, 'It's a Small World.' It'll kill anything, but it's such a miserable song...it won't stay in your head on its own." Couldn't have said it better myself. But I digress. This story begins as Virgil is called in when a big-shot medical doctor and University of Minnesota professor is murdered in an upper-level, usually locked library room on the campus - a place he's really not supposed to be. Especially since he's for the most part an unlikable jerk, there's no shortage of suspects, from his research team colleagues to members of a rival research team to his own daughter. Most of the characters are quirky, to say the least (well, this is a university campus, after all). And early on, it appears the good doctor just might be living a secret life that involves illicit drugs and blackmail. As is customary in these books, Virgil touches base with his former boss, Lucas Davenport (the subject of another popular series by this author and another of my love-to-read-about characters, BTW). A couple of his old friends get to help out, as does a scrappy female officer from the local police who gives Virgil a good run for his money in the sarcasm department. Problem is, all of those above-mentioned suspects have what appear to be iron-clad alibis. Clearly, it will take a goodly amount of sleuthing to uncover the motive and catch the killer. All that is accomplished in fine Virgil style, making this another must-read book for fans like me. Thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read and review an advance copy. Bloody good!
Momma_Becky 15 days ago
Virgil Flowers is back, and in addition to his personal life changing drastically, he gets a case that is anything but normal. Then again, when has Virgil ever done normal? I've been a fan of Virgil's since he was first introduced way back when in the Prey series, and the more I read of him, the more I like him. He's not your average cop, and he certainly doesn't dress like one. His investigation style may be different, and it doesn't really follow a procedure, but his out of the box ways do produce results. In Bloody Genius, we get plenty of Virgil's own brand of investigating. I always picture him casually strolling around, asking questions and plucking tidbits out of conversations. He does the same here, although it's not always with his usual almost lazy style. I don't want to give anything away, but I will add that Sandford gives us the answers, we just have to be paying attention. I'll admit, I very nearly missed it, but for me, I've grown to love these characters, so the books are as much about catching up with them as solving the mystery. Speaking of characters, we do get some Jenkins and Shrake time, which is always fun. You know things are going to start happening when those two show up. And in true Sandford form. once things all come together, it's a race to the finish. As always, we get Sandford's sharp wit and sense of timing in a wonderfully written book full of interesting and entertaining characters. If you're up to date with the series, you already know that Virgil has some big things on the horizon, and those things are only getting bigger. I can't wait to see what's next for this terrific character.