David Copperfield (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

David Copperfield (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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David Copperfield 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 197 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
So often people express reluctance to take on the great literature of the past because of the feeling that it's a little too much like taking medicine. 'I know that reading this 'classic' is good for me because it's a classic, or so I'm told.' This seems to dissuade many readers from approaching works such as David Copperfield. This summer I have read four Dicken's classics, Bleak House, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations and Copperfield. Copperfield will reward any modern reader with its kaleidoscope of Victorian England, rich with humor and memorable characters. Allow yourself to become lost in the memories of this most famous of fictional autobiographers. The language of Dickens is always a pleasure as he wraps his florobundant prose around a cast of character's and scenes that are never boring and often are filled with humor and pathos, and sometimes both at the same time. It's hard to imagine the inward looking authors of the 20th Century Existing without the foundation of the inward novel from characters such as David Copperfield, Pip of Great Expectations and Esther of Bleak House. David's memories are filtered through his own perception and foreknowledge of what occurs in his life after. Dickens use of the first person narrative in telling David's story anchors you to David's reactions to the events of his life and connects you as a reader to similar events or relationships in your own life. Finally, people are always calling Dickens characters caricatures, but as you read about the Micawbers or Uriah Heep, or Dora and think they seem like immutable beings think about the characters in your own life and see how mutable they are, and Dickens caricatures, even 165 years later seem accurate and rooted in reality. Lastly, don't be fightened by the weight of this tome. Once Dickens envelops you in his world and his language, be it in this work or any of his others, you will glide through his works and reach for the next.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel is another reason Dickens is read generation after generation after generation. I certainly remember reading Dickens in school, but my appreciation for him has grown greater in my later years. There are probably many who grasp Dickens at the high school level and can enjoy him greatly however, it is not untill my later years that I have come to really enjoy him. This novel originally published in magazine form over a duration of time can at first seem long and daunting and yet it seemed in no time that I was able to finish it. The title character obviously is David Copperfield and it is somewhat a biographical sketch of the author Charles Dickens life. While the first of the novel can seem almost unbearbly painful with the character's father dying just several months before his birth and his aunt abondening the family immediatly after Copperfields birth, and the loss of his mother at a young age, things do get better. Dickens intorduces us to a cast of characters that are enjoyable and we get to follow along as David Copperfield goes through his own life. If you enjoyed Dickens in highschool than you are ahead of the game. If you did not enjoy Dickens in high shcool than give him another chance.
KlassicKate More than 1 year ago
There is a reason why Charles Dickens calls this book 'his favorite child'. What a fantastic read! This is truly a classic. Don't get hung up on the 'old English language' used. Just chug on through it. It's well worth it to take a month to read through this novel and get to know David, as well as the rest of the cast of characters that Dickens brings to life throughout each chapter. A well woven, well told story, that should be read by everyone at least once in his/her lifetime.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After absolutely struggling to get through Great Expectations, i groaned when i had to read this book for school. However, I loved it from beginning to end. Dicken creates absolutely brilliant characters, some whom you will love, and some that you hate. all in all an excellent read.
xMissMelaniex More than 1 year ago
This was my first read of Charles Dickens writing and I loved it. His writing style makes you really have to ponder the point he is getting across. I always see a lot of humor in his writing and enjoy the characters thoroughly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You ppl who think this book was bad and thought it was hard to read.... honestly i think you are a bad student and have bad reading grades. I bet u didnt even TRY
Krod More than 1 year ago
Although I have only read two of Dickens's novels, which include this and the Tales of Two Cities, I must say that David Copperfield has surpassed my expectations and is now perhaps my favorite book. The author's way of communicating human emotions clearly and effectively has the reader completely hooked and very much in tears in most areas of the novel. Without ruining the novel for you, the story is basically about the life of a very young boy who grows up in a tough and tyrannical childhood. Eventually, he escapes this reality and  finds refuge in his aunt, in hopes of making a new beginning for himself and find true happiness.  Yes, I know the size of this novel seems formidable, but I do assure you that you WILL NOT be disappointed at ALL. The characters that Dickens brings out to life are truly memorable (my favorite characters are David, obviously, and Mr. Peggotty) I do advise if you  can to take notes because if you ever decide to reread this novel, it will be interesting to see how you thought years ago. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
David Copperfield is a long, interesting, dramatic journey through a boy's life. It takes you to his early childhood up to his adulthood. I'd say this a good book for not only for pleasure, but also for psychology purposes because the book sort of goes into detail about how all the difficult events he had gone through impacted him; for instance, when his mother died, finding out he had to go to boarding school for biting his stepfather those kind of things. The only thing I don't like about Charles Dickens's writing is that it's too lengthy and too flowery; but he is a good writer, very imaginative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This edition, by B&N Classics, is extremely difficult to read. The print is small and the lines are very close to each other. I had to rate it only 3 stars for that reason (I would have given 5 otherwise). I bought this book because I have had other books from B&N Classics which were extremely readable. Other publishers usually have the same or similar print in all of their books, so I assumed that that would be the case with this edition of David Copperfield. I will have to buy another version to get through the remainder of the book. I will probably go with the Modern Library Classics version because their print is always readable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an awesome read, one of Dicken's best!
Guest More than 1 year ago
With its vivid descriptions of various episodes of David Copperfield's life, its remarkable cast of characters, its startling blend of humor and tragedy, and its intricate, well-woven tapestry of plots, this is Dickens at its best. This book is wonderful, and anyone that has ever fallen in love, suffered after a parent's remarriage, started off on their own career, or been betrayed by a friend will be able to relate to the narrator's experiences.
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Copperfield is one of the most incredible novels I've ever come across. Charles Dicken's gift for writing manuscript is amazing. His use of words are intelligent, and constructed cleverly. If you wish to enjoyably stagger your vocabulary, read some remarkable conversations, or find yourself dubstruck at many intricate letters {written by Mr. Micawber} this is the book to have. I found it to have interesting characters, an excellent plot, and a captivating discourse. I highly recommend this treasure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite pieces of literature. A long book, but full of Dickens' classic style, and well worth it. Sad, funny, inspiring, etc. It tears at your emotions, you form strong opinions on the characters, and you get a look into Dickens' actual life. In my opinion, it is slightly better than A Tale of Two Cities. A true classic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'David Copperfield' is a sad but wonderful novel.It talks about a young boy left alone in the world with a cruel stepfather after his parents die!The step father sends him on his own to make his life at a young age so he runs to his aunt's house.He later on grows up in his humble aut's home until he had to go to school.He learned so much as he went to school ,David was a bright kid all threw his years,but always ran into bad luck for some reason.As a grown up Mr. Copperfield realizes all the difficulties of being an adult, but he still manages it.He later lives a life very well with three children and a lovely wife and nice friends. I think 'David Copperfield' should be past on down to others because it has so many life lessons in it.I refer this book to 'the Outsiders' because the moral of this novel is so strong.When I read this book i felt myself being one with Mr. Copperfield, a strong independent man that would be able to manage if left alone in a world.The book really did not sound good to read when i first picked it up but i read it anyway and im glad i didnt judge a book by its cover!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is all about Davey and his life as he grows up. Full of humorous charactors and lessons that David learns as he grows up. Can be sad, happy and provokes anger at the charactors! I think it's an extremely well-written book, but only enjoyed by those who love old-time literature! But I absolutely loved it!
Anonymous 5 months ago
**ladies please... lets not get fiesty** She sits in the computer lab, watching the Twenty One Pilots Bandito tour and drinking a yoohoo.
Anonymous 5 months ago
REMOVE THAT $HIT
chrystal on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
David Copperfield is the story of a young man¿s adventures on his journey from an unhappy and impoverished childhood to the discovery of his vocation as a successful novelist. Among the gloriously vivid cast of characters he encounters are his tyrannical stepfather, Mr. Murdstone; his formidable aunt, Betsey Trotwood; the eternally humble yet treacherous Uriah Heep; frivolous, enchanting Dora; and the magnificently impecunious Micawber, one of literature¿s great comic creations. In David Copperfield¿the novel he described as his ¿favorite child¿¿Dickens drew revealingly on his own experiences to create one of his most exuberant and enduringly popular works, filled with tragedy and comedy in equal measure.
pickwick817 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the story of a boy growing up in England. At the begining his father has already passed away. Soon his mother remarries to a man who's only care is to treat David poorly with the presumed reason to bring him up correctly. Before long his mother dies too. His stepfather and his stepfathers evil sister then withdraw David from school, to send him to work for a friend. Thus freeing themselves of the expense of educating him. After a while working, in poor conditions, he runs away to find his long lost Aunt. Here his life takes a turn for the better. She sends him to school, with a plan for a career in law.
john257hopper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A marvellous roller coaster of a book, this semi-autobiographical novel contains all the emotions of life, the highs and lows, trials and tribulations of the eponymous hero. It's a big book, of course, but, unlike some other Dickens novels, its narrative drive is generally so strong that one can read it like a modern novel, so this took me just over two weeks to read, as opposed to the three weeks of the shorter Barnaby Rudge. Wonderful characters throughout. A genuine all time classic, with timeless things to say about love, loss, grief and other emotions.
theboylatham on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago

Two out of ten.

David Copperfield is the story of a young man’s adventures on his journey from an unhappy and impoverished childhood to the discovery of his vocation as a successful novelist.

Boring.

The_Hibernator on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When young David Copperfield's mother dies, his awful stepfather sends him to a workhouse. David runs away to live with an estranged (and very strange) aunt. Much naughty and nice activity continues for a long time. :) I really liked David Copperfield. It was an engaging story, and (as always for Dickens) the characters were all so fascinating and well-developed. I'd say this is one of my favorite Dickens books so far.
jnwelch on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"Of all my books, I like this the best. It will be easily believed that I am a fond parent to every child of my fancy, and no one can ever love that family as dearly as I love them. But, like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is DAVID COPPERFIELD."Charles Dickens in the Preface to the 1867 Edition of David CopperfieldSentimental, full of tears and elation, oddball characters, prolixity, villains and heroes, angelic women and sinning men, oppressors and oppressed, con men and their victims, the steadfast and the persevering, the eloquent, the grandiloquent and the tongue-tied, all abetted by a multitude of monumental coincidences - David Copperfield is a sprawling wonder, pure addictive reading. We meet Dickens' favorite character as a baby, when his aunt Betsey Trotford is so annoyed he isn't a girl that she takes a swing at the doctor, and follow him as a young boy as he outlasts an abusive stepfather, a school where he is subjected to mockery and mistreatment, "cold neglect", a grinding warehouse job at age 10, and much more. There are periods of happiness, particularly idyllic days in Yarmouth by the sea with his mother's maid Pegotty and her earthy family, but his life turns in the right direction only when he manages to change the mind of aunt Betsey and she begins to see his redeeming qualities.Our narrator, David C. makes fun of his propensity to desperately fall in love, and recounts wonderful tales like the warm rapprochement between a cart-driver and Peggoty initiated by David, at the cart-driver's request, who informs Peggotty that "Barkis is willing". We meet the impassioned, voluble, good-hearted but perpetually destitute Mr. Micawber and his equally impassioned wife, sincere but always put upon Traddles, heartbroken Mr. Whitfield and his angelic daughter Agnes, the Achilles-like but misguided Steerforth, and many others, including of course the poker-stab-inviting Uriah Heep. (Throughout the story is enhanced by the old-fashioned illustrations by Hablot Browne). Repulsed by unctuous Uriah, Betsey Trotwood, in one of her many on-the-money comments, says, "If you're an eel, sir, conduct yourself like one. If you're a man, control your limbs, sir! I am not going to be serpentined and corkscrewed out of my senses!"David eventually falls for pretty little Dora, who adores her dog Jip: "if we were not all three in fairyland, certainly I was." The scent of a geranium reminds him of an early meeting with her: "I see a straw hat and blue ribbons, and a quantity of curls, and a little black dog being held up, in two slender arms, against a bank of blossoms and bright leaves." There are sore trials ahead, and nefarious doings, with romance gone awry for some and delayed for others, while our favorite continues to doggedly press ahead and maintain his well-balanced outlook. If his good sense ever begins to fail him, Agnes and Aunt Betsey come to his aid. When one relationship falters because David seeks too hard to "improve" his paramour, Aunt Betsey reminds him, "You have chosen freely for yourself, and have chosen a very pretty and very affectionate creature. It will be your duty, and it will be your pleasure, too . . . to estimate her (as you chose her) by the qualities she has, and not by the qualities she may not have." Sound advice for a healthy relationship. I'd give a lot to have an Aunt Betsey come visit our family. She's a wonderful character.Does everything come right in the end? Not everything, and there are tears throughout, but also triumphant successes. David's character has often been viewed as autobiographical, and we know some of what he endures matches Dickens' own early travails. Some of Dickens' success also comes to David. While the breadth of the story and the number of memorable characters is staggering, in the end there is an almost fairytale-like quality to the book and its paths that all lead to one another. Not just David, but the reader, is happily dr
morryb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This novel is another reason Dickens is read generation after generation after generation. I certainly remember reading Dickens in school, by my appreciation for him has grown greater in my later years. There are probably many who grasp Dickens at the high school level and can enjoy him greatly, it is not until my later years that I have come to really enjoy him. This novel origianlly published in magazine form over a duration of time can at first seem long and daunting and yet is seemed in no time that I was able to finish it. The title character obviously is David Copperfield and this is somewhat of a autobiographical sketch of the author Charles Dickens life. (Notice the initials DC and CD). While the first of the novel can seem almost unbearably painful with the character's father dying just several months befor his birth and hiss aunt abandoning the family immediately after Copperfield's birth and the loss of his mother at at young age, things do get better. Dickens introduces us to a cast of characters that are enjoyable and we get to follow along as David Copperfield goes through his own life. If you enjoyed Dickens in high school, than you are ahead of the game. If you did not enjoy Dickens in high school, than give him another chance.
carioca on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
How is it possible to review David Copperfield? I think it is only fair to say that David Copperfield is my favorite Dickens work. And also the first I ever read of his, back when I was only a little girl. If I am not mistaken, I first read it when I was about 11 years old. I reread it many times since; I love this book. It is so rich, the characters are so magnificently drawn, and David himself seems to be the most charming, irresistible little boy. Dickens also did a pretty good job in combining tragedy with wit and madventure; David Copperfield is indeed a complete novel in every sense.