Flesh Eaters

Flesh Eaters

by Joe Mckinney

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Flesh Eaters 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great series. This is the 3rd book.
drakevaughn More than 1 year ago
How could I skip a zombie story that won the Bram Stoker Award for best novel? Perhaps this set my expectations too high, but I was sorely disappointed. That isn’t to say Flesh Eaters is bad. The problem is that it’s really just average. It’s an adept tale and a quick read, but never steps outside the typical disaster story stereotypes. Nothing surprised me, but again, nothing disappointed me either. It’s similar to an inoffensive pop song, which one forgets the tune as soon as the radio is turned off. The novel is set in the wake of a hurricane ravaging Houston, Texas. If the floods and havoc of the disaster wasn’t enough, there is a zombie outbreak added to the mix. The main character is a female police officer, which is a pleasant change from the typical macho-military-types who dominate the zombie genre. However, outside of being labeled a woman, this officer demonstrates few feminine qualities. Everything from her commanding style of speech, to the way she fights, and even how she describes a handsome coworker in purely physical terms, is masculine. If McKinney had changed her name from Eleanor to Eliot, I wouldn’t have noticed a difference. And worse still, nothing made me want to care for her, other than the fact she was inoffensive and not corrupt like the others. In this, McKinney offers a simplified morality play where the bland prevail, while anyone evil gets their just reward. Sure, this is friendly and uplifting, but the problem is that it’s not that interesting to read.
TammiCole More than 1 year ago
I had certain expectations when I started this book and even formed other expectations while reading. Because of this, when the book took a turn I wasn't expecting, I was jostled by it that much more. There were some very intense moments and at one point, I had to put the book down and come back to it. Joe does an incredible job of taking an incomprehensible situation and landing it right in the middle of your living room, quite literally! The characters were believable, which made it that much easier to associate with them and visualize what they were going through. Just made it that much scarier! This one starts a little slow, but it's all necessary to build the backstory. Push through it. You won't be disapointed and you won't want to put it down once it takes off!
harstan More than 1 year ago
First there was Rita; followed by Ike. Both were Category Five leaving a battered Houston barely surviving. Now a third Category Five hurricane Hector slams into the city followed by another even bigger storm Kyle. A secondary tidal wave hammered the city devastating chemical and oil containers. The dead were pushed by the contaminated rushing waters inland as far as forty-five miles from the city. Hurricane Mardel left the city underwater and the coastline moved several miles inland. As the crisis turned pandemic, people showed their true colors including the Nortons and the Shaws. Houston is a dead zone and the Shaws dynamite an underwater bank and take seven million dollars. Eleanor, Jon and their teenage daughter Madison want to just leave the city. One thing prevents the family from escaping Houston: zombies. The toxic soup created a necrosis virus that is a big brother to Ebola. The creatures are cannibals who neither talk nor think. With their strange eyes they hunt humans to kill and multiply the new species who own the Gulf coast Texas. Joe McKinney provides a scary prequel to Dead City and Apocalypse of the Dead as a series of hurricanes (ignoring the alpha order) devastate Houston leading to a zombie infestation. Filled with plenty filled of action, readers will enjoy the depth of the tale as the Norton brood try to survive. Harriet Klausner
TerryWeyna on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Was 2011 a bad year for the horror novel? I¿ve yet to read any of the nominees for the 2012 Bram Stoker Award for best novel except Flesh Eaters by Joe McKinney, the winner, and I find myself puzzled. Was this really the best the year had to offer? It¿s a competent enough zombie novel, but nothing special. Flesh Eaters tells the story of the loss of Houston, Texas, to a close series of tropical storms, one after another hitting the city until it has essentially become part of the Gulf of Mexico. As was the case with Hurricane Katrina and the tragedy of New Orleans in 2005, Houston is not effectively evacuated, and is largely cut off from the rest of civilization in the aftermath of the storms. This isolation becomes considerably more pronounced when the combination of filthy conditions, flooding by heavily polluted water, and the proximity of thousands of people gives rise to a new disease. This disease does not cause the dead to walk, but it does cause those infected to lose most of their brain function and to seek to eat human flesh ¿ in other words, they become zombies. In inhibiting brain function, the disease also makes the zombies almost immune to injury except for the destruction of the brain, most easily by a shot to the head. The story told in this novel focuses on Eleanor Norton, a police officer involved with the portion of the Houston police force changed with handling emergency conditions ¿ precisely like severe storms. Norton is intent on ensuring the survival of her husband and her nearly-teenage daughter, both of whom do not have quite her level of courage and fortitude. Jim and Madison have a great deal of difficulty maintaining their home after the first and second storms, when they are housebound. But things get worse after the third storm tears them from their home and sets them afloat in a rowboat on filthy water filled with corpses. The other major character in this novel is Captain Mark Shaw, leader of the emergency division of the Houston police force. Shaw is a dedicated officer, one for whom honor trumps all, and he is devastated by his inability to ensure the safety of Houston¿s residents. He is loath to report to his superiors outside Houston that zombies have begun to roam the streets, knowing that the news will cause those outside Houston to make it difficult for survivors to escape the ruined city. And despite his honor, he sees an opportunity in this horrible situation in the form of a submerged bank vault and the ready availability, purely by accident, of some underwater explosives. There are no surprises here. This novel follows the pattern of every disaster movie you¿ve ever seen, with the situation getting increasingly worse, the good mostly surviving and the bad pretty much universally getting their comeuppance. Because the novel is predictable, there is little tension in it. I would probably have ceased reading it halfway through if it weren¿t that I knew it had won the Stoker; I kept expecting something truly interesting to emerge, but nothing ever did. Perhaps the problem is that Flesh Eaters is the third book in a quartet; perhaps the Stoker was awarded to McKinney as a way of honoring the entire project, instead of just this single novel. I cannot recommend Flesh Eaters as a good read standing on its own, however, and am not sufficiently impressed to pick up the two earlier books, Dead City and Apocalypse of the Dead, or the forthcoming The Zombie King. I¿m disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
cartmanking68 More than 1 year ago
Joe uses his police experience to paint a clear picture for the reader. Stories are exciting and heart wrenching with a touch of humor. Good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written- had a hard time putting it down!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nice and brain tastic
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the story line but always with this authors books in this series for me is the irritating characters. And this is by far the book with the worst characters. The main character is in the middle of a zombie outbreak with her child and she actually spends time fantasizing about a fellow cops hunky good looks, umm huh, really? Come on! But, even with the ridiculous characters and trust me they are all pretty bad, the story still keeps you going. I would read it again.
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grgoyal More than 1 year ago
this book is a must have its good i highly recommend, you wont want to put it down but by far Joe's best book was Dead City i hope he writes another book
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