Green: The Beginning and the End (Circle Series #0)

Green: The Beginning and the End (Circle Series #0)

by Ted Dekker

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Green 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 187 reviews.
david_lindsey More than 1 year ago
Green is book zero in Ted Dekker's "The Circle" series, Green actually being the fourth installment of the series. The idea is that a reader should be able to pick up the series at any point, and follow through all four books, thus the title of the series"The Circle". I found green to interesting, and as I got into it, I discovered some familiarity although I have not read any of the other three books from the series. Dekker has cleverly tied this series in with another series of his, the Paradise novels. I had read the book "Showdown" from that series a few years ago. As I said I did find Green to be interesting as a story and the series interesting from a conceptual standpoint. However, whether it was unfamiliarity with the other titles or not understanding the whole of how all these titles intertwine, or a combination of all of the above I found it difficult at times to keep up and understand. I constantly felt I was missing something that would not be found within the pages I was reading, yet not curious enough to sort it out by going through the other titles that are related to Green. Maybe if I had started at a true beginning point it would have been different.
FaithfulBP More than 1 year ago
I totally geeked out when I received this book in the mail. Not because I had read any of Ted Dekker's book previously in the past or due to even a marginal interest in Christian Fiction books. No, I geeked out because earlier in the year a friend of mine told me about the Circle Series books. He said that "the books twist you and turn you and flip you and by the end you are not completely sure what happened except that you're loving Jesus more." His word is an authority for me when it comes to literature. So needless to say, I geeked out. I found the book available and asked my literature guru friend whether I should start or end with Green. His answer was a definitive "End with it, dude." So I ordered the rest of the books, read them and then moved onto this book. The series is truly phenomenal and Green was a great read. Quick Summary: Green is a story of love, betrayal, and sweeping reversals set within the apocalypse. I believe that the series could not have ended any better or any more seamlessly then it did with Green. I would recommend this book to anyone who had read the previous books in the series or wanted a good read that would "twist you and turn you and flip you and by the end you are not completely sure what happened except that you're loving Jesus more."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first book I ever read by Ted Dekker was Black - the first book in his circle trilogy and, even more so, the beginning of a unique universe where the future mingles with the past and where evil and goodness meet. When I discovered that Dekker would be writing a fourth book directly related to the Circle Trilogy, I was anxious for its release. The ending to White (the last in the trilogy) was a satisfying conclusion, but at the same time I was left wanting more. Along the way, Deker dropped hints in his other books suggesting that life went on for Thomas Hunter, the book's protagonist. Green did not totally disappoint. The story starts off slow in my opinion. However, Dekker states that all of his books can be read in any order. When one considers that this may be the first book one reads of Thomas Hunter, then I suppose the start does a nice job of presenting characters and back story. For those already immersed in the history, it may not get off to the quick start you're hoping for. The story is full of the actions sequences and world (or is it time) hopping that were staples in the previous novels. Dekker also does a nice job of answering questions that we left hanging at the conclusion of White. What became of both the worlds? Did Justin ever return? What became of the Forest Guard and their battle against the Horde? In which world did Thomas really belong? I know many people who were on the fence about this book and I can understand why. While this book is well written and full of that Dekker-esque mystery, it just lacked something. As I mentioned, I've found that those who have already been through the trilogy as well as the other related books (Showdown, House, Skin, The Lost Books, Sinner, Saint, etc) did not enjoy this book as much as the others. The ending, while great and something I definitely didn't see coming, left something to be desired. Especially when compared to White's conclusion - there were questions yes...but it really stemmed from a desire of wanting the story to continue. I believe if I had read Green before any of the other books, I would have felt differently. I'd rate this book 3/5 for returning Circle fans and 4/5 for newcomers.
Calicat More than 1 year ago
Green is a fantasy novel, created as an allegory to parallel the realities of right and wrong. At first sight, the novel's preface, written by the author Ted Dekker, purports that the quality of this fantasy is comparable to C.S. Lewis' Narnia series and J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. However, Green fails to elicit the profound symbolism and dynamic resolution that both Narnia and The Lord of the Rings contain. The story Green begins in a new world that God created after the apocalypse, and it begins to unfold as Thomas Hunter, the leader of the Circle, and the Circle - the "chosen" people - delight in their Great Romance at a ceremonial celebration of their faith. As beautiful as that description of faith is, the story begins a downward spiral of dark themes beyond this initial attribute. Thomas and the Circle have been given a command from God to love their neighbors at all costs, which leads them to flee their enemies, the Horde, who are warriors out for blood. The plot stirs as Samuel, Thomas Hunter's son, begins to rebel against this command, and leads a group to battle the forces of evil amongst them. Thomas Hunter then initiates a battle between the Horde and evil leaders, who are consumed with blood. At this point, I was forcing myself to read this Christian fiction, as the layers of grotesque blood sacrifices from the evil powers sent this novel flying over the fence into the land of weird for me. A dual experience then comes into play, as the antagonist characters, Janae and Billy, who were living in present day 2010, find a way to enter the future, the new world, and join the forces of evil to plot against the Circle, and mainly, their leader, Thomas, as the Circle holds out in hope that God will deliver them from evil. I would not recommend this book at all, but if you are in the market for Christian allegories/fantasy, I would instead recommend making room in your library for C.S. Lewis and Tolkien, as the author, at least in endeavor, tried to replicate those classics.
DorianSD More than 1 year ago
Green is supposed to serve as either the start to your adventure in The Circle series or the conclusion of your journey through the novels. For myself (having not read any of the others and reading this first), I found certain characters and plot lines which were key to the base story not developed enough. I felt somewhat lost in much of the book, because I sensed that I only partly knew what was going on. Of course knowing that it is a series and much of that would (or should) be explained in the other three novels, doesn't make it any less frustrating while you're actually reading. I understand the interest in fantasy books written from a Christian perspective, but personally I found a lot of the book quite dark, and at times disturbing. The preface of the book, touches on previous books written where good and evil duke it out in a mythical sense, like Aslan's and Frodo's tales. Green slides very much to the side of the Hobbit's book in its telling, quite unlike the more mild nature of the land within the Wardrobe's story. All that being said, if you are a fantasy buff, interested in the battle of good, evil and human nature, can read about people partaking in blood drinking and other less than glorifying ritutals all without making your stomach queasy, you may want to read Green, Book 0 in The Circle Series. Myself, I'm not itching to read Black at the moment (the next book), there are plenty of other books on my list I'll pick up first.
JenReview More than 1 year ago
"Green" is the fourth book in the series, after "Black," "Red," and "White," and is referred to as both the beginning and the end of the series. Since I haven't read the first three books, I found this book very hard to get into because Dekker often refers to the previous books (and other books he wrote). I was lost right from the start because the author seems to assume the readers are familiar with the other books, and due to this, there was a lack of character development in "Green." This story is set in a future world, where evil is evident. The book was well-written, and if you liked the first three books in the Circle Trilogy, this will probably work for you. Dekker does a good job of weaving together the stories from several different books, but I don't think he should assume the readers are familiar with all his books. "Green" wasn't for me, because it was hard to follow as a first-time Dekker reader. I didn't care for the vampires, and it was a bit too violent for my taste. I will consider reading the other three books and trying to make sense of it all after that, but my first impression of Dekker's writing was not great. I am a Thomas Nelson book reviewer. http://brb.thomasnelson.com/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yoohoo! Anyone here??
atdCross on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Well, admittedly, for me it wasn't as thrilling as ride as the the previous ones - "Black", "Red", White", but the ending just blew me away: I did not expect it at all. Maybe I should have by the title but it was totally wierd for me. I said to myself, "That Dekker is s punk!" (with utmost respect for Dekker). I couldn't believe the ending and I'm not gonna give it away. If anyone is planning to read the "Circle" series, I cannot more strongly recommend that he read "Green" last (the others can be read in any order). Dekker continues to faithfully mess with my head.
jmmclendon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With the Circle Series, Dekker has created a different twist on a post-apocalypse tale. In the Terminator films, robots come back from the future to prevent certain events from taking place. Thomas Hunter falls asleep in our world only to awaken in the future after Elyon has created a new world. He struggles to deal with this shift in reality as he move back and forth in time to overcome challenges in both worlds. Though it is touted as "Book 0: The Beginning and the End", I do not recommend reading it before the others in the series (Black, Red, & White). While En Media Res is an effective literary tool, I think too much is missing to jump in at this point in the series; it certainly fits better as a #4 and, through its unique nature, a #0 simultaneously, as the subtitle implies. The plot moves quickly keeping the reader engaged. This installment in the series has some unique elements that may intrigue readers of other genres.
aziemer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thomas Hunter has saved Earth from a deadly virus and fended off the Horde. Thomas no longer dreams, but this does not mean there are not events happening in the Earth world that will gravely impact Thomas' forest world. Though unaware of the coming events on Earth, Thomas suspects there is a war fast approaching. His beloved son has created turmoil and unrest throughout the Forest people. Thomas must find a way to bring his people together again and save not only his son but the future of the F...more Thomas Hunter has saved Earth from a deadly virus and fended off the Horde. Thomas no longer dreams, but this does not mean there are not events happening in the Earth world that will gravely impact Thomas' forest world. Though unaware of the coming events on Earth, Thomas suspects there is a war fast approaching. His beloved son has created turmoil and unrest throughout the Forest people. Thomas must find a way to bring his people together again and save not only his son but the future of the Forest. With multiple betrayals, this task will be the ultimate challenge.Ted Dekker does it again. His final chapter in the Circle series will have the reader turning pages long into the night. The suspense enthralls the reader to continue the journey through unsuspecting turns and astonishing twists. There are a few new characters introduced while other absent characters return. Green is not only the sequel to the series but the prequel as well. In addition, Dekker does a fabulous job of weaving in connecting series' such as The Paradise series and The Lost Books series. It was a fabulous end, or beginning depending on how you view it, to a most-engaging series. I highly recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She sighed.
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Back from the hospital?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ted Dekker is a genius the way he wrote these books is just amazing when people say there's something missing it's because you HAVE to read them all to fully understand it. No one will ever be able to perfect this kind of writing as Dekker has in the circle series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
These books are amazing. I first listened to Black on audio and fell in love. The imagination, and thought he put into this series is like none other. If you want to understand you should read the other 3. If you read Green first, think of it like watching a movie that brings you backwards as you go..... i.e 2 years ago.... after the teaser of present time.
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