If I Die in a Combat Zone (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

If I Die in a Combat Zone (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by Tim O'Brien, Tim O'brien

Hardcover(Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)

$30.60
View All Available Formats & Editions

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

If I Die in a Combat Zone 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
preston64 More than 1 year ago
If I Die in a Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home is Tim O¿Brien¿s personal account of the daily life of a soldier during the Vietnam War. The beginning of the book takes us through O¿Brien¿s childhood, and his lack of desire to join the army. As main plot points begin to unfold, the reader learns more about Tim¿s life in the war training camp, and his new friend Erik. Both Erik and Tim are opposed to the war, and the United States¿ involvement. Against his will, O¿Brien is sent to the Vietnamese forest where he finishes his training at a nearby base, then is assigned to the Alpha Company 5th battalion of the 46th infantry, 198th infantry brigade. In this company, O¿Brien experiences the many horrors of war, and does not hesitate to go into detail about the horrific capability of mines, and how they mangled not only soldiers, but many civilians as well. Near the end of the story, Tim is offered a job near the rear, and is lifted away from the face-to-face jungle skirmishes. The time at the rear is more peaceful; as the account ends with Tim O¿Brien being flown back home. One of the things that was debated internally in myself was this simple question. Is questioning the American Government as an American anti-american, or patriotic? At first a reasonable answer to this would be anti-american because you are disagreeing with the government and what they have decided. With further thought though, it can also be seen that questioning the government can be patriotic as well. If the intention is to better this great nation, then it is patriotic. If one is just criticizing the government just to disagree, then that is what is anti-american. This is a fantastic account on an American soldiers mindset in the Vietnam War, as well as the atrocities that were committed throughout the war. If one is interested in either of these categories then this book is for you. O¿Brien¿s detail will leave no one¿s curiosity unsatisfied, and with his use of language he portrays the sinister picture of the Vietnamese War according to the soldiers. I would give this book three out of five stars, it is entertaining, although it has some slow moments and it takes some time to really get into this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like this book because it is similiar to another book I read about the Vietnam War, 1970-71. The audience can learn so much about the Vietnam War in so few pages from this book! I wish I had been exposed to this book and others at a younger age that relate to the Vietnam War. However, it is never to late to study, learn, and try to imagine what it was like fighting on the ground during the Vietnam War. O'Brien's own experiences in country 'Vietnam' with an infantry unit is told in detail in this book. Thank You Mr. O'Brien for writing your side of the story, and not going to Canada after all. I will read this book again!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great way to start to read any of f Tim's books. It is the tale of his own war experience and justifies all of his war novels. In the begining he almost appears to be a coward but he redeams himself and wins you over. Its not his best title but it is a must if you want to read any of his other war titles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i got this book because i really like his other work but this one didnt pull me in as much as his others. If i die in a combat zone goes much quicker through the events then his others. overall i liked the book but i dont think it was great.
snat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
For me, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried is the most powerful book that I have every read and it's the standard against which I judge all things O'Brien. In The Things They Carried, O'Brien plays with nonlinear and fragmented narrative structure, magical realism, and the power of storytelling to capture the visceral truth that telling the real story can't quite capture. For O'Brien, we must sometimes turn to fiction to capture what is "emotionally true" and, in doing so, be less concerned with an objective reality. In a way, If I Die in a Combat Zone makes this point for him. Written 15 years before Things, If I Die is a memoir of Tim O'Brien's experience in the Vietnam War. There is no metafiction razzle-dazzle, but rather a straight-forward, linear narrative that begins when O'Brien is drafted and ends as he boards the Freedom Bird headed toward home. It's powerful stuff, but not nearly as powerful as his fiction work. Despite that, anything by Tim O'Brien is better than almost anything else out there--fiction or non-fiction. Having grown up in the post-World War II glow of American military might, O'Brien grew up in the ask-no-questions patriotic culture of the Midwest. Real men were expected to fight. Real men were supposed to look forward to war. Real men craved the opportunity to serve their country and protect their families. O'Brien doesn't reject these values, but these views are complicated by his natural philosophical inclinations. He questions the nature of bravery, as well as how American intervention in Vietnam is protecting the average American's right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In the aftermath, he's left with no certain answers: "Now, war ended, all I am left with are simple, unprofound scraps of truth. Men die. Fear hurts and humiliates. It is hard to be brave. It is hard to know what bravery is. Dead human beings are heavy and awkward to carry . . . Is that the stuff for a morality lesson, even for a theme? . . . Can the foot soldier teach anything important about war, merely for having been there? I think not. He can tell war stories." And that's what O'Brien does in the novel--he tells war stories. He tells of the tedious days of repetition, punctuated by brief bursts of action; he tells of military incompetence and the frustration of not knowing who the enemy is in a land where farmers by day picked up guns at night; he tells of how cruel being sent on R&R was, knowing the brief return to normality would not last. And he does all of this without being preachy; he simply shows us what life was like for the average soldier and leaves us to draw our own conclusions. His language is at once poetic and precise, getting to the heart of all things. No one can capture the peculiar mix of fear, adrenaline fed excitement, and remorse of a soldier's most introspective moments like O'Brien. At one point, O'Brien ruminates on Ernest Hemingway's fascination with war: "Some say Ernest Hemingway was obsessed by the need to show bravery in battle. It started, they say, somewhere in World War I and ended when he passed his final test in Idaho. If the man was obsessed with the notion of courage, that was a fault. But, reading Hemingway's war journalism and his war stories, you get the sense that he was simply concerned about bravery, hence about cowardice, and that seems a virtue, a sublime and profound concern that few men have." It's a concern that permeates all of O'Brien's work and his treatment of it is indeed sublime.
cwhouston on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a brief but interesting war story of O'Brian's year as a rifleman in the infantry in Vietnam. This is much better than the lamentable "And a Hard Rain Fell" but not as good as "Dispatches" by Michael Herr, in my opinion. O'Brian seems to fancy himself as a writer, which is rather optimistic, and his discussion of the nature of courage is not particularly useful.Unfortunately, I'm still searching for the Vietnam war's equivalent of "The Forgotten Soldier" by Guy Sajer or "Storm of Steel" by Ernst Junger.
urhockey22 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this in college, so I have forgotten the details, but I remember it being a very good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
But not great. I had high expectations of this book and was a little let down. The authors other works are much better reads than this one. Sorry but true. The book sounds and reads like so many others about the war.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got this book as a teen in the late 70's to see what the hubub of Vietnam was all about. After all these years, this book still rings the bell of what war is and how unglamorous it's not- I've passed this one over to MY teenager and hope others will too, so that future generations know what being in an unpopular war is all about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very moving tale from the 'average-mans' perspective of the vietnam war. Feels like you are walking with and experiencing what the infantrymen are.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was very well composed and it make me realize the harsh raalities of the Vietnam war. O'Brien sure captured my heart and thoughts. I would highly recommend this book to any history fan!