Never Deceive a Duke

Never Deceive a Duke

by Liz Carlyle

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Never Deceive a Duke 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Never Deceive a Duke Liz Carlyle Pocket, Aug 2007, $7.50 ISBN 9781416527152 With the Napoleonic Wars part of the history books, shipping has returned somewhat to normal. Thus part owner of Neville Shipping, Gareth Lloyd, is doing quite well. However, he soon learns he has inherited the ducal estate that has driven him to succeed in obtaining wealth. Gareth deems it acrimoniously ironic that he is now the Duke of Warneham as the previous recipient of the title, his grandfather, exiled Gareth when he was the child Gabriel to a harsh life. He considers ignoring the title, but reluctantly visits his new country estate, Selsdon Court. There he meets his predecessor¿s young widow, Antonia, who some suspect poisoned her elderly husband. They are attracted to one another, but both suffer from demons and besides neither trust the other as he considers whether she is a black widow and she wonders why his family disowned him. Meanwhile she still grieves the death of her daughter while he faces the same anti-Jewish bias that sent him away as a child. --- The second ¿Never¿ a fabulous late regency romance that stars two likable individuals who hide their soft interior with an acerbic armor as both learned early in life to trust no one although Xanthia and Kieran (see NEVER LIE TO A LADY) has pierced Gareth¿s shield as they treat him like an adored brother. The story line is fast-paced with the changing relationship between Antonia and Gabriel, as only she calls him, being the prime plot supported by an investigation into the death of the previous duke and enhanced by the religious prejudice suffered by Jews. Liz Carlyle provides a fresh historical that showcases why she is consistently one of the sub-genre¿s best. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous 7 months ago
Couldn't put it down! Wonderful love story, as usual.
theshadowknows on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If anything, Liz Carlyle can certainly write. Even when the story she tells isn¿t quite as well put together, her prose sweeps you up and places you right in the minds of her characters. Never Deceive a Duke picks up right after Never Lie to a Lady, after Gareth Lloyd¿s unrequited love, Xanthia Neville, heroine of NLL, has been married off to Lord Nash. Gareth isn¿t too pleased, and things just keep getting worse when he finds out he¿s inherited a dukedom upon the death of his cousin. There¿s bad blood between Gareth and the former duke, which comprises a twisted family history of murder(s), anti-Semitism, betrayal, and abuse. Gareth has tried to put all that behind him, embracing his life as a shipping magnate and unofficially adopted brother to Xanthia and her brother ¿ they¿re all three of them joint owners of Neville Shipping. Gareth¿s tortured past comes rushing painfully back to him once he¿s forced to very reluctantly join the unwelcoming aristocracy and assume responsibility for his estate. This includes meeting and deciding what to do about the dowager duchess, the former duke¿s widow, Antonia. She happens to have a whole boatload of baggage of her own, which makes them quite a depressed/depressing pair. Never Deceive a Duke is a pretty good read. Its pacing falters at times, but not too badly. There¿s a murder mystery, which develops into several murder mysteries, actually, and this aspect of the plot seemed well constructed. Though things did a little complicated near the end, when it seemed like everyone and their mother had been murdered at some point. The ubiquitous George Kemble makes an appearance here. He¿s called in to do all the dirty work and get to the bottom of the former duke¿s death. There have been nasty rumors that Antonia did him in for her own gain, and Gareth, having instantly taken a shine to her, wants her name cleared. I love George Kemble. He¿s hilarious, but still chillingly dangerous, and steals the show every time. As for the romance, it was unbalanced at best. Gareth I really liked. He¿s a very tortured guy. The flashbacks prefacing each chapter provide powerful, moving vignettes of his childhood, the difficulties of being raised between two worlds, neither fully Jewish, nor accepted into the English aristocracy. I¿ve never come across a Jewish hero before, and I think that through the flashbacks this aspect of his character was well drawn. He¿s a unique character. The extent and depth of his pain, what he¿s suffered, isn¿t readily apparent. The way in which his character is thus layered and gradually explored was skillfully handled, and my favorite part of the book. Gareth quietly suffers throughout, never wallowing in self pity. He¿s a very strong, very appealing hero. Antonia, while equally tortured, is more pathetic than noble in her suffering. She¿s basically a depressed, shattered, shadow of her former self, having undergone a nervous breakdown and been committed to an insane asylum. This was before her marriage to the former duke, which took place barely a year after her first husband¿s death, which had precipitated her mental collapse. She¿s also exiled from society because of all the nasty murder rumors. I thought it was really interesting to have a heroine purported to be mad, after coming across so many supposedly mad heroes. Maybe madness is sexier in men or something¿ who knows. Either way, Antonia fits into the woman in white role perfectly ¿ fragile, not quite all there, sad, weak, and broken. Unfortunately, the romance suffers for her overriding weakness, because Gareth has to take care of her the whole time, despite her protestations that she¿s getting stronger and starting to know her own mind. Their conversations sound like therapy sessions as Gareth dispenses pearls of wisdom and tries to piece Antonia back together. (I have to mention, even though it¿s nitpicking, that their conversations bugged the hell out of me though because Gare
new_user on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately, I didn't enjoy this book as much as everyone else did. This was my first from Carlyle, and I don't think I care for this author's style very much. She writes like a modern American writing a Regency novel, e.g. the hero Gareth keeps reiterating over and over the value of working and that life is meaningless without work, etc. This just would not have been present in England at that time. Likewise the heroine's many reflections on the situation of her fellow women, even as she explains to her servant that "she must behave appropriately" in a very June Cleaver fashion. These moments kept jarring me from the storytelling, and the duchess came off as nothing more than an archetype, shallowly developed. We know she's resistant to her lot in life because this is conveyed not-so-subtly when she keeps becoming flustered and "flushing" or otherwise lapsing in the ladylike composure that is so obviously important to her. Needless to say, this cannot power a character through three or four hundred pages. We need a little more, a heartbeat perhaps, and I got the impression her flustered routine continued a long while. As anothe reviewer wrote, she's just needy (that's the entirety of her character). I liked Gareth, but he's misplaced here for the reasons I mentioned before. I also thought if the author took the time to establish in flashbacks that Gareth comes from a partly Jewish heritage and that his childhood suffered because of it that the flashbacks should have been connected to the present at one point, perhaps mentioning his difficulties in the present, or else they seem somewhat aimless. It would have been more useful for the flashbacks to center around his ship experiences in that case, which seem to have affected him strongly (and to tell from his repeated mentions of it, continue to affect him). The dialogue and some of the secondary characters felt as if the writer had done her research watching Disney's adaptation of the times. I can suspend disbelief, and I can read less faithful reimaginings of the period. I don't mind-- but it's a little difficult when a novel takes itself so seriously while an anachronism entirely powers a character's motivations. It's a little hard to ignore. Most likely, I wouldn't have caught onto this if the romance were less limp (or just the heroine), if there were heat, tension, whatever you call it. Gareth was too strong to credibly fall for this kind of heroine. But there you have it. Sorry, folks, I know a lot of people read her.((Note: If you'd like to read an author who's done her research and, whether from exposure or from education and an open mind, can write British and French characters believably without them becoming caricatures, I recommend Joanne Bourne's The Spymaster's Lady. I'm reading it now and I love it.))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story, good twists, too much sex.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Graphic child sexual abuse
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a really good read. I highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story was full of romance, life long pain getting resolved ( childhood sexual abuse, rejection, loosing family, being Jewish in England but never fully belonging anywhere....) as well as a multiple deaths hanging overhead! Wow and a feel good love story budding! Gareth/Gabriel got his story told - a book worth reading! Looking forward to the next one in this series.
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It's definitely well written book . Other reviews already provided many details of the story line . Numbers of serious problems have been not just mentioned but got developed . Regarding "too much sex" , if I may I would like to give it my own understanding of its meaning in this romance . The first time it was not like something between the Duke and Duchess , but like the salvation of two lonely souls in extremely difficult situation . Both main characters are such complicated that love and marriage are far away from their plans . But first bite of the apple was done , and memory of it and curiosity would bring them together soon . They tried to convince themselves that it's for body pleasure only . In reality they discover each other during intimate scenes . And then comes love that makes them stronger and whole . So, don't worry about sex . You would not be drown in it . There so much more in this book, including mystery . I feel confident about recommend this book . I 'm going to read Gabriel 's friends ' stories now . G.K.