Ninth Ward

Ninth Ward

by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Paperback(Reprint)

$18.80
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Ninth Ward 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 73 reviews.
Greg Levins More than 1 year ago
Loved the book. I highly recomend it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I agree with you all. It is a very inspirational book. The passion and care Laneesha had was amazing.
Staciele on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of Lanesha and Mama Ya-Ya grabbed me right away. Of course, we all know what happens when Hurricane Katrina hits New Orleans, but the author still gives me new glimpses of what it must have been like for families that stayed behind to fight the storm. Her descriptions of the days after the hurricane broke my heart as Lanesha suffered through the toughest parts. I think this is a great Young Adult novel and is an excellent teaching tool of how to be strong when adversity strikes, how other cultures live and about what is really important in the end. Ghosts and seeing into the future were also a part of the story, and while I am not a believer in that, their part of the story was an interesting piece of Lanesha's life.
corydickason on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Ninth Ward is a really stunning novel, encompassing only the few days before and after the storm. Children too young to remember Katrina or who have trouble understanding the gravity of the aftermath will find this young girl easy to relate to.
amandacb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While I enjoyed the character of Lanesha and thought it was handled appropriately, I did not enjoy all of the mysticism and ghostly aspects of the novel. I suppose that is part of the Cajun/New Orleans culture (?), but I felt it detracted from the overall experience of the novel and made parts of it unbelievable. Having the novel told from the perspective of someone so young does, of course, leave out details, probably gory ones, that occurred during Katrina--but for the audience level, I think that is appropriate.
jebass on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a beautiful story about an intelligent and sweet little girl named Lenesha, who, upon her mother's death during her birth, was taken in and raised by the local "medicine woman," if you will, Mama Ya-Ya. Mama Ya-Ya loves Lenesha as her own, and encourages Lenesha not to be ashamed of her "gifts"--seeing ghosts, predicting the future to some extent, etc. When Hurricane Katrina comes roaring through New Orleans, Mama Ya-Ya, who is very poor, has no where to go and nowhere to take Lenesha. When the hurricane is over, Mama Ya-Ya, together with the ghost of Lenesha's mother, warn Lenesha that she must get into the attic, take the food they have prepared, and tell her she must "stay strong" if she is going to live through the night and the rising flood waters. Lenesha must use every ounce of strength she can muster to save herself, her friend Tashon, and their shared dog Spot. This book would be perfect for a child who lived through Katrina, to make friends with Lenesha's character through shared experience, or for children to learn about what it was like to live through the storm.
KarenBall on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I see darkness on the horizon. Rolling, rolling in like a too-warm blanket...I shiver. Tell myself not to be afraid. We'll survive the hurricane.Ghosts told me so. Lanesha is 12, and has grown up in the poor neighborhood of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. She lives with Mama YaYa, a healer and midwife who delivered Lanesha, but couldn't save her teenage mother. Lanesha's mother's "uptown family" has never wanted her, but MamaYaya has loved her as if she were her own. Lanesha has always been able to see ghosts, including her mother, who has never left Mama YaYa's house. She is also smart, and loves math and school, even though she has few friends. When Mama YaYa dreams of a storm and a blackness that follows, they are both confused, until Hurricane Katrina appears in the Gulf and advances on the city. They have no money to evacuate, and so they stay in their house, hunkered down with some basic supplies. It's up to Lanesha to use everything she has learned, from school, from Mama YaYa, and from the ghosts, in order to survive the storm and the flood that follows. Beautifully written historical fiction, with magical realism and some of the best characters around! Lanesha is one of the most courageous and resilient girls I have ever read about. 6th grade and up.
bplma on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
12 year old Lanesha lives in New Orlean's Ninth Ward. Her mother died in childbirth and she is being raised by Mama YaYA-- an 82 yr. old midwife and healer who keeps to the old ways. Lanesha is a powerful seer-- she sees ghosts everywhere-- her house, her school, her neighborhood--the other kids are afraid of her and so, always different-- Lanesha keeps to herself. When Hurricane Katrina hits New Orleans, Lanesha needs to stay strong and focused and trust in all she has learned in order to save herself and those she loves. Beautifully written and well paced ---a coming of age story (of sorts) in the eye of Katrina. For Middle School a
jayegee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story makes a good attempt to shocase life after Katrina, the reader must remeber it is a child's point of view. The storyline is unrealistic of the nature of Katrina's sudden aftermath. It doesn't convey the pain.
DayehSensei on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A poetic, mystical and suspenseful story set in New Orleans, August 2005. Rhodes' text features 12 year old Lanesha and her beloved caretaker Mama Ya-Ya and their struggles the week before Hurricane Katrina and during the storm. While the book focuses on the horror and hardship of the hurricane, Lanesha's own personal struggles are an equal focal point-- self acceptance, dreams for the future, missing her deceased mother. This story will captivate upper elementary and middle school readers everywhere. While it features fantastical elements (Lanesha and Mama Yaya can both see and communicate with ghosts; Mama Yaya can predict the future), the story is incredibly real and heart wrenching.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. It was sad at some parts and it made me cry. A must read r every one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is bahd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SO AMAZING AND SAD!!!! :-) ;-)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is like soooo good.....soooooo like yeah....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If i had to rate it on a scale of 0 to 100 it would be 200!!
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Hy
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