The Room and the Chair

The Room and the Chair

by Lorraine Adams

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Room and the Chair 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
USAF Captain Mary Goodwin flies her F-16 over the Washington DC area protecting the friendly skies. However, her jet suddenly has engine trouble and she is forced to eject from the cockpit. Although she cannot prove it, she feels something odd happened to her plane. Mary is almost immediately deployed to Afghanistan, which she finds odd with the rapidity the military sent her to theatre. Washington Spectator night editor Stanley Belson finds the incident over the Potomac also strange especially with how fast the Air Force got Mary out of DC. He has his top gun Vera Hastings investigate the incident. Unbeknownst to either woman, top secret intel chief Will Holmes knows what happened but insures damage control is spun taut as he allowed an anti-suicide test using an unwitting subject too soon. The key cast members are somewhat stereotyped to enhance the suspense, especially in the Middle East, and to strafe bomb the political-media complex in which the truth is irrelevant as only ratings (for the media and for the politicians) are out there. Ironically the State-side chapters pale next to the Middle East sections as the incidents overseas are harrowing and breathtaking with a wide range of reactions while inside the United States decadence and lying rule. Although too many threads are left dangling, fans will appreciate this deep look at a perilous complicated world in which medicated Americans are served tea. Harriet Klausner
wortklauberlein on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A military pilot loses control over the Potomac and crash lands on Theodore Roosevelt Island. But was it an accident? An editor at the big Washington daily is curious and a Metro reporter eventually investigates. Meanwhile, a spooky type is feeling a little bad because the pilot is a woman and all he seems to have wanted to do was test his ability to remotely force a plane out of the sky, in case a terrorist gets a hold of it. Scene switches to Iran, where a nuclear engineer talks to his luggage, runs to a safe place, runs back, is possibly blown up in his hotel room. Back to the pilot, now out of Walter Reed and in Afghanistan, flying a nasty bomb drop and then going sledding. Tragedy happens. Back at the Post, erp, whatever it was named, a Woodward figure and a maybe Sally Quinn figure and the intrepid Metro night editor (night editors rock!) futz around, while the reporter sort of figures out the pilot crash story with the help of an underage prostitute. She also pinpoints the Important Facts buried in a Senate Intelligence Committee report that the Woodward guy may have had but was saving for his own book (okay that part rings true) and the sort-of Sally person had but was too wrapped up in her own drama to deal with it in a timely fashion. No matter. With the truth staring them in the collective eyeball, the AMEs still aren't buying the reporter's story, for vague reasons having nothing obvious to do with dead-trees and digital platforms.Most of this isn't believable (really, would a Metro reporter drive out to NoVa and not first get her road directions straight?), although the adventures of Mary the Downed Pilot did keep me reading, even past the chapter with the nuke engineer, in which the fact that this is a Literary Novel was jammed down the reader's esophagus. ("During their one meeting...on a blasting cold sun of a morning, nothing moved Will's digit of a face." And, "Hoseyn couldn't summon his own phone number to mind. It felt as if he had a dowel in his cortex." And, "There was a knock at the door. It was a columnar noise.")Ex-Postie Lorraine Adams might be trying to skewer people and things that deserve skewering, but to paraphrase a line from her effort: "[She] could have parachuted into the field of potatoes when it was in the onions where [she'd] been supposed to land."
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