The Glittering Court (Glittering Court Series #1)

The Glittering Court (Glittering Court Series #1)

by Richelle Mead

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The Glittering Court 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having never read the vamp acad books or any other rachel mead books i found this one uniquely intriguing. Yes at times it got repetitive and dry but the overall and general outlook remains at a great level. I admire the level of imagination needed to kickstart such an enormous plot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great read! I couldn't put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fell in love the first 100 pages
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book does not disappoint for lovers of Richelle's ability to create an engaging world and dynamic characters
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Long story short wrap up. Could have had more detailed closure. A lot of small characters played big parts that we never really learned about.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love reading Richelles novels, she always finds some way to transport you to a new world you feel like you've been living there your whole life. I look forward to joinig Adelaid and Cedrick on their new journey to come!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved the cover,but i didnt find the book nearly as interesting as her others. It was a bit dry
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great concept.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The idea of the Glittering court was intriguing and would have been enough if the author would have written in more detail about it. However, this book goes far beyond that, there isn't a strong connection between characters because of the fast pace and the end is baffling. Don't put too much thought into this one.
thelonereader More than 1 year ago
I was crazy excited for this book because first, it's Richelle Mead, and second, look at that cover, and third, I was told it would be like Reign. Long story short: it was nothing like Reign. There were a few balls, there were pretty dresses, there was competition, there was friendship, and there was romance, but it was not like Reign. I just have to make that clear in case any one else is going into this book thinking they're going to get something like the tv show, because they're not. From pretty much the third page of the book, I knew that The Glittering Court was going to be very different from what I was expecting: I think the reason for this was how we were introduced to the love interest, Cedric. He was just too nice, if I'm being honest. There was an attraction between him and Adelaide - her fake name - from the very beginning, and it took away from some/most of the angst, at least for me. I simply don't find romances very interesting when the main characters are obvious about their love from the very beginning. Of course there are exceptions to this very general statement, but it holds for this book. I will admit there were several cute moments in the novel between the two, and that I'm also glad that they're a couple because they work very well together - it just didn't arouse many swoony feelings inside of me, and that's something I regret. Now, our girl Adelaide has two friends, Mira and Tamsin, and throughout the book I found myself wishing that the story could have been told in one of their points of view instead, since Adelaide wasn't a character I found myself connecting with easily. I found faults with her constantly, which isn't so much the problem as the fact that she was a stereotypical rich girl in many ways. It got annoying fast, though I eventually grew to appreciate her. Besides, Mira and Tamsin had so many secrets, which makes so much more sense knowing that the next two books will be told in both those girls' points of view. I'm much more excited for those books now that I know that. Personally I'm hoping for Mira's story first since I have a ship for her and everything; I'm so ready for her perspective on everything. I know I said this book is nothing like Reign, but I mean that in an overall plot kind of way. Yes, there were similarities in pagan religions and hot dudes following that religion and so forth, but in the long run, none of that seemed to warrant the label "this is like Reign." So yeah. Anyways, since I brought up plot, there was this really weird, out-of-nowhere plot twist that came up about 150 pages before the end of the book, and surprisingly enough, that's exactly when I began to become interested in the book. Everything else was nothing different than anything we've seen in books like The Selection, but suddenly, there was a Wild West turn and there was dirt, digging, gold, Indians, and a whole bunch of things you wouldn't expect in a book called The Glittering Court. I'm weirded out, but also super glad because at this point, things got really fast-paced and a lot was at stake. I don't know if it was necessary, but my only desire is that the entire book could have had the same genre and intensity as that small part of the novel. Here's to hoping that Mira and Tamsin's story focuses on this part of the plot, because this is where secrets started being kept and the three girls began to diverge from one another. Continue this review at http://the-lone-reader-blog.blogspot.com
Anonymous 9 months ago
Another great read from Richelle Mead. The adventure the twists and turns, loved every part of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I expected more from this book. It was almost to telling who would end up with who and who was going to die.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
NovelKnight More than 1 year ago
I should have DNFed this book ages ago. It should be noted that Richelle Mead is one of my favorite authors and up until her most recent releases (i.e. Soundless) that held true. But I held faith in her other books so I picked this up. Cue boredom. I mean, honestly, did anything happen in this book? ANYTHING? I couldn’t care less about the protagonist, Adelaide, or her messed up logic. Though a countess, she’s short on funds and doesn’t want to marry to save face and have a steady income once more so clearly the best choice is to go off and enter into a contract that all but forces her to marry someone else in the new world. Makes TOTAL sense. On and on, Adelaide makes these stupid decisions that made zero sense to me. I’m not really sure what the whole point was of The Glittering Court because for two-thirds of the story it’s just Adelaide pretending not to know anything about being a lady and the rest is this romance-thing that was awful. Really, if you’re going to have a romance, at least make it good. Which, for the record, generally involves an interesting, if not likable, protagonist and a love interest who isn’t more than a stand-in to create tension and trouble in the story. I honestly found no interest in any of the characters, though, except for wondering where Mira kept disappearing to and later what happened to Tamsin (up until that point she was just annoying). This world Mead creates is that of a country colonizing a new world. Huh, wonder where I’ve heard that before… I mean, it’s not a unique concept but the way this is written almost reads like historical fiction with different country names. Perhaps that’s why the lack of world-building wasn’t as big an issue for me as the plot and characters — my brain just filled in the blanks. The only thing that I found weird was the basis of the whole story: young women who essentially become a form of mail-order bride, entering into a contract where men buy them to be their wives. This is something right of a history book but seemed an unusual and not entirely logical choice for Adelaide to pursue for her future. The short of that? This isn’t really fantasy. At least not in the magical sense. If that’s what you’re looking for, steer clear. The world is made up but the events read like history. Also, can we talk about how even the women in this book think poorly of their own sex? That the idea of offering oneself to a complete stranger is perfectly acceptable. Even Adelaide sees nothing wrong with it. Alright, so… where does this leave The Glittering Court? No character development, and starting off with boring characters to begin with. Little world-building. Sexist. Boring. Just. Boring. My only hope is that the rest of the series gets better, not that I’m sure if I’ll pick up future books with how this one went. While I enjoyed Mead’s earlier YA titles, and loved her adult ones, I think I’ll just stick to the latter now and save myself the trouble. There’s no way I can recommend this book so if you’re looking to read any of this author’s work, I recommend checking out her books prior to this and Soundless.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had high hopes for this book, but was disappointed. It was very slow at times and the characters were hard to relate with. I do like the different world and society created in this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fun and delightful adventure with romance, suspense, and a pace that won't let you put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic character development. The dystopia genre has alot of attention lately but this managed to stand out.
WhatsBeyondForks More than 1 year ago
This isn't Vampire Academy. Not even close. So, don't expect that. That's not a bad thing though. This is its own story. Adelaide (aka Elizabeth) comes from Osfrid, a place very much like England and is escaping to Adoria, a place very much like the USA. So, even thought it is fantasy fiction in that respect, it felt more like a historical fiction. I like both genres so, I was happy either way. With its humor, adventure, drama, and romance, The Glittering Court had something to entertain a wide variety of audiences.
Lisa-LostInLiterature More than 1 year ago
I struggle quite a bit with fantasy reads. As a contemporary girl, the majority of what I read is pure contemps. From YA to Adult, I prefer very realistic and relateable stories. I’ve been trying my best to venture out of this comfort zone I’m in and read more fantasy, especially when they sound so interesting to me. I have to admit this was more of a cover-love-at-first-sight situation, but I was definitely intrigued by the premise. This is also my first Richelle Mead, and after hearing such wonderful things about her writing, I figured this was a good one to start with. At first I was a little put off by Adelaide. I felt like she was a weaker heroine than I had hoped for, and I wasn’t convinced that I would grow to like her at all… but I did! She started to show her spunky and out-spoken side as the story progressed, and I loved that about her. This is a historical read, and to see a female in that time frame speak out the way she did was enough to cause her to weasel into my heart just a bit. I honestly wish there had been more romance in this book. I understand that every book doesn’t have to be overflowing with romance, but that’s just a personal preference of mine. It definitely sets it up for more in further books, which is a good thing for sure. I also felt like there was a lot going on… like, too much, actually. Again, something that may be fleshed out more in the coming books. I have to admit, I almost DNF’d this one. I was struggling with it quite a bit, and I honestly felt that it just wasn’t for me. But my curiosity got the better of me, I suppose, and I decided to stick with it. Overall, I did end up enjoying it, though I wasn’t wowed like I had hoped to be. So many people have devoured this book and loved every minute of it, so don’t take my opinion of it as the end-all, be-all. If you haven’t read this yet and you’re thinking about it, I definitely suggest you at least give it a try. You just may fall in love with it like so many others have. (Thanks to Razorbill for the review copy!)
BuckeyeAngel More than 1 year ago
Adelaide belonged to one of the noblest families in Osfrid, one that could trace it’s bloodline back to the county’s founders. Adelaide had to marry well as her family no longer had the money it once had. Adelaide’s grandmother - Alice- came to Adelaide to tell her a miracle had happened . Adelaide's parents were dead and she lived with her grandmother since their deaths. Lionel =Baron of Ashby had made an offer. He was a very rich cousin. Adelaide didn’t know him and after meeting him and his very controlling grandmother Adelaide said no to his offer. Then Adelaide put Lionel out of her mind. Then Adelaide gained knowledge of the Glittering Court . Adelaide the passes as Ada to get out of the arranged marriage to Lionel/ Adelaide had to join the Glittering Court which is designed to change women with low class stigma into upper class lady’s. Adelaide excels in her training and makes a few friends. No one knows who she really is but Cedric. Adelaide is attracted to Cedric and he to her but it would cause a scandal for them to be together. Adelaide was to attract a wealthy husband in the new land. I just couldn’t get into this story guess it just wasn’t for me. There wasn’t much action or anything to rally pull you into the story and keep you glued to the story. I also didn’t think there was really alot of chemistry from Cedric to Adelaide. I also just found the story confusing . I just didn’t like it. I received an ARC of this story for an honest review.
mdemanatee More than 1 year ago
Adelaide is an aristocratic woman about to enter into an arranged marriage she knows will not satisfy her in order to save her family’s name and fortunes. And then The Glittering Court comes recruiting one of her servants, and Adelaide decides to take her place. The Glittering Court is recruiting girls to be trained in the skills of the upper classes in order to appeal as wives to men in the new world. This offers working class girls opportunities they never dreamed of and one thing they never thought they’d have: choice. It offers Adelaide this same freedom, though she comes from much different circumstances. But her world is complicated by the friends, rivals, and love interests that cross her path. This went from a mix between Princess Academy and the Selection to a Western, more particularly Gold Rush-y (I am not usually a Western person). Everything felt based in American history. I honestly had no concept of the made-up countries and religions in this book. My head immediately transcribed them into their recognizable historical parallels. I don’t know if this was intended or not, but I would not describe this as a world that feels tangible to me on it’s own right now. Rather, in my head it is colonial America. If that was the intent, spot on. Adelaide is pretty strong throughout, even when she’s out of her comfort zone. Though she did become slightly less interesting to me over time. I think some of this could have been the narrative losing its forward momentum. The novel is only around 400 pages, but it feels longer sometimes. Partly because a lot happens and a good amount of time is spanned. Still, Adelaide’s story is pretty well contained in this novel. Goodreads lists this as part of a series, and I hope it’s going to take a My Fair Assassins approach and follow different girls. I am very intrigued to follow the two closest friends Adelaide made in The Glittering Court. And seeds have definitely been planted for them to have their own stories. There is obviously a romance angle in this novel. I say obviously because at least at Barnes & Noble it’s shelved in teen romance, and Richelle Mead is known for her romance plot lines in YA I think. I had no major issues with the romance. I was rooting for it. I liked the flirtations we got especially at the beginning. I did think the “jealous rival” we were introduced to was a little obvious and underdeveloped, but hey, if I lump this in with a romance novel structure it fits. If The Glittering Court could fell somewhat plodding and predictable to me as a reader today, I also recognize this is the kind of book that I would have eaten up as a high schooler. I probably would have used it to ease my wait between A Great and Terrible Beauty books. I didn’t adore this book; I didn’t hate it. It was some nice escapism, but when I reached the last page I was okay with that.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was excited to read another by mead but the book reads very poorly. Main character is unlikeable and the book reads immaturely.