Winter Kill (Last Gunfighter Series #21)

Winter Kill (Last Gunfighter Series #21)

by William W. Johnstone, J. A. Johnstone

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback)

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Winter Kill (Last Gunfighter Series #21) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
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bookburnerRM More than 1 year ago
This was so well written that I was freezing right along with them as they trekked through the mountains. I also would like to see Meg and Salty accompany Frank on a couple more adventures. Thanks for letting me ride along. Ron
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would have expected better writing from a 7th grader. My biggest gripe was the complete lack of research of the journey making the entire story an impossible feat. 30 minutes of reading wikipedia would probably have given a factual foundation to lay down the fictitious events on. I think the author looked at a map and saw Alaska down in the corner by Hawaii and thought "oh hell, they can hike from the bottom to the top in a week or so". In my knowledge nobody went to Whitehorse via Skagway, it would take months of hiking virtually the entire length of Alaska. They took steamers to Nome and up the Yukon river where they hoofed it over the Chilkoot pass. In the book the author seems to think horses can make it over the pass. It was a hand-over-foot climb, and the Canadian govt. insisted every person bring 1,000 pounds of food before they were even allowed into Canada. The characters seem to be reinvented as the author wrote, fist "The Drifter" is a hard-nosed gunfighter who doesn't want to go to Alaska and suddenly he's a sensitive, caring man who wouldn't dream of not going. To the point of arguing that he be allowed to make the journey. The story had too many inconsistencies. First, Skagway is 50 miles away and Frank wants to make 5 miles a day (seriously, I've packed 90 pounds of moose 4x that in one day) which makes the trip 10 days. 3 days later they're suddenly in Skagway? The dialog was stilted and broken. Sometimes Frank has a southern drawl and other times it's normal, clipped speech. Most of the dialog is simply filler and doesn't lend itself to the story at all. The story dragged on ridiculously slow. I do not want to read an entire chapter of how Frank goes to the store. I do not want to read how Frank turned around and pushed something with his back. Just say "he pushed with his back". Every sentence is written with enough extraneous language that a child could understand it. I feel bad for ranting when I'm sure the author spent a lot of time writing it, but it isn't worth as much as the paper it's printed on. I wouldn't read it if the book were free.