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101 Things I Learned in Culinary School
     

101 Things I Learned in Culinary School

4.3 9
by Louis Eguaras, Matthew Frederick (With)
 

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Louis Eguaras, a renowned chef at the Le Cordon Bleu Program at the California School of Culinary Arts, provides readers with a terrific overview of what is truly involved in the preparation, cooking, and presentation of meals. He also provides invaluable insights into just what is involved in making this one's chosen profession.

The book will feature a wide

Overview

Louis Eguaras, a renowned chef at the Le Cordon Bleu Program at the California School of Culinary Arts, provides readers with a terrific overview of what is truly involved in the preparation, cooking, and presentation of meals. He also provides invaluable insights into just what is involved in making this one's chosen profession.

The book will feature a wide range of illustrated lessons, from how to properly hold a knife... to the history of food... from food preparation and presentation... to restaurant hospitality and management, and much more.

The book will be presented in the distinctive and highly-attractive packaged style of 101 THINGS I LEARNED® IN ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL, and will be the perfect gift for anyone who is thinking about entering culinary school, is already enrolled, or even just the casual chef.

Editorial Reviews

The percentage of culinary school graduates among American home cooks is infinitesimal, yet we continue to be surprised by the mediocre meals we turn out. Louis Eguaras's 101 Things I Learned in Culinary School can be used as a pre-class prep for aspiring professional chefs; it can also be regarded as equally useful for mom and dad deputized for home-cooking duties. Good tips that you will remember. (Hand-selling tips: 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School proved that this attractively packaged series has solid sales potential. The author is a chef at the prestigious California School of Culinary Arts.)

Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

Expanding on the success of his 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School, architect and urban designer Frederick picks the brain of former White House staff chef Eguaras, now a professor at the California School of Culinary Arts. Though slim, this book is all meat with no fat: Eguaras offers tips on everything from calibrating a meat thermometer to getting the most out of a whole chicken, keeping salad dressing from separating (use an emulsifier like mayo or mustard), putting out a grease fire (smother with a pan lid, never use water) and identifying poisonous foods. Line drawings by architect Frederick provide clear illustration of Eguaras's concepts, as well as clever cartoon counterpoints. Peppered with cogent quotes and trivia (the world's oldest cookbook was written by a first century Roman), this culinary crash course is sure to surprise and enlighten even the most informed gourmands. Other volumes in the 101 Things series are set to follow.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446550307
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
05/20/2010
Pages:
212
Sales rank:
520,812
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 5.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Read an Excerpt

101 Things I Learned (TM) in Culinary School


By Eguaras, Louis

Grand Central Publishing

Copyright © 2010 Eguaras, Louis
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780446550307

1

There are only two ways to cook.

Dry cooking uses direct heat—radiation, convection, or oil. Methods include sautéing, panfrying, deep-frying, grilling, broiling, roasting, and baking. It produces browning or searing of the food’s outside surface.

Moist cooking uses water, stock, or other liquid (other than oil) as a medium for transferring heat. Methods include blanching, boiling, simmering, poaching, and steaming. The foods are not browned and tend to be tender when done. For best heat transfer, the cooking vessel should be large enough for the food to be completely surrounded by the liquid or steam.

Dry and moist methods can be combined. In braising and stewing, a tougher cut of meat is seared with dry heat, and then simmered for several hours in liquid to tenderize.



Continues...

Excerpted from 101 Things I Learned (TM) in Culinary School by Eguaras, Louis Copyright © 2010 by Eguaras, Louis. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

LOUIS EGUARAS is a chef and instructor of international cuisine in the renowned Le Cordon Bleu Program at the California School of Culinary Arts. He is currently teaching courses in cooking and food history.

His twenty plus years of experience includes responsibilites as Staff Chef at the White House and Camp David, and Executive Chef and Marketing Manager in several other settings.

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101 Things I Learned in Culinary School 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a really good book it helped me out alot
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