11 Experiments That Failed

11 Experiments That Failed

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780375847622
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 09/27/2011
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 292,902
Product dimensions: 11.20(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile: 440L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

JENNY OFFILL is the author of 17 Things I’m Not Allowed to Do Anymore, a Parenting Magazine Best Book of the Year and a Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book of the Year, and 11 Experiments That Failed, also a Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book of the Year, which Kirkus Reviews, in a starred review, called “the most joyful and clever whimsy.”

NANCY CARPENTER is the illustrator of 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore by Jenny Offill, called "picture-perfect" in a starred review by School Libary Journal; Imogene's Last Stand by Candace Fleming; Apples to Oregon, an ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book, and Fannie in the Kitchen, both by Deborah Hopkinson; Sitti's Secrets by Naomi Shihab Nye, winner of the Jane Addams Picture Book Award; and Masai and I by Virginia Kroll. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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11 Experiments That Failed 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A clever book that sets out the scientific method with some pretty kookie experiments that will make the kids in your life laugh as well as you!
Venisa on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Genre: Informational Review: This story is informational because of the 11 experiments that the main character conducts throughout. This book is perfect for science experiments relatable to upper elementary age kids because it is all experiments that they could try. Even if they can't try some of them, it gives enough information about conducting an experiment, what making a hypothesis looks like, the actual experiment, and then the result that it could be used for students to create their own experiments with a hypothesis and then results. Awesome book! Point of View: The point of view in this story is first person. It is told by the main character, the girl creating and testing all of the experiments. She tells it as she is doing it. Example of one experiment that she tell us: "Question: Do dogs like to be covered in glitter? My hypothesis: Dogs like everything. What to do: 1. Call dog. 2. Cover with glitter. 3. Let dog go. What happened: Doge ate glitter. Pink sparkly yard." The illustrations show that it is her telling each story. They fit each experiment perfectly. Media: pen-and-ink and digital media
debnance on LibraryThing 8 months ago
The author of 17 Things I¿m Not Allowed to Do comes up with another list book. This time, our main character shows all the experiments she tried that failed, cleverly revealing in the process the quirky quality of children¿s thinking. Absolutely delightful. ¿Question:What makes fungus grow?Hypothesis:If left in a closet, food will rot and become a colorful fungus garden.What You Need:Brother¿s shoesBread and cheeseWaterWhat to Do:1.Place food inside shoes.2.Sprinkle with water.3.Hide shoes in back of closet.4.Return in two weeks.What Happened:Experiment is still under way.¿ (Accompanying drawing shoes a tennis shoe with mushrooms growing out of it.)