1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West

1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West

by Roger Crowley
4.5 19

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1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read 1453 immediately after I finished reading 1421, a novel that documents the discovery of America by Chinese sailors. 1453 is a wonderful and timely work that comes out at a time when the world is again faced with another period of religious zealotry fomented by the descendants of Puritans and Hester Prynne of Scarlet Letter fame. No matter how many wannabe world conquerors we have endured in history, there is always another ready in the wings. I think the most damning part of the book is reserved for the Catholic Church and its fixation on Papal infallibility and authority. The two arrogant quotes from Popes Nicolas 1 and Gregory VII are amazing. Had the Catholic Church sent more troops to Constantinople on time, the result of the battle would have been different, and Mehmet would not have carried the day. Jesus would be shocked at the arrogance of the popes who sometimes believe they are God. Now I understand the deep seated dislike of Muslims for Christians and Christians for Muslims much better. I would rather love all men as Jesus said to do.
ljbirns More than 1 year ago
A VG history but not up to his more excellent book Empires of the Sea
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book. With an interest in christian and middle eastern topics, the title and topic intrigued me. While the story telling is good, and the writing style is good, the details tend to get repeated in various chapters and this makes the reading a little boring at times, but the sense of impending tragedy for an ancient city and the level of detail of the battles and how the rivals ConstantineXI and Mehmet managed and inspired their troops was imformative. The information on the unfortunate rivalries and disputes between the Catholics and Orthodox and Venetians and Genoans and the Muslims was very educational and has some relevance to today's concerns. Overall it was a good read for someone with an interest in historical events.
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Suhan More than 1 year ago
This is a nice read about the conquering of Constantinople. Even as a native myself, I've not known some of the facts and details that have been mentioned here with great effort. The creation of the timeline for the events would be extremely hard since the accounts telling the event was limited. I'm looking forward to reading his new book as well.
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1453 is an extremely well-written account of the finals days of perhaps the most overlooked and interesting empire that ever existed.
sgtderry More than 1 year ago
I feel as thought I lived through this great siege and epic event.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Roger Crowley's amazing feat truly stands as a modern testament to great historical writing. Many of the other reviewers have already emphasized the lucid, insightful, and verily entertaining writing. Crowley handles his source material not just even-handedly and scientifically (like a historian should), but even artistically, making this not just great history but a great read as well! As Crowley himself puts it, his aim was 'to capture the sound of human voices - to reproduce the words, prejudices, hopes, and fears of the protagonists firsthand - and to tell something of 'the story of the story'' (page 263 in the hardcover edition). Sharing 'the story of the story' with their readers is something that, alas, many scholars omit in favor of dry lists of facts and analysis. Crowley transports the reader into a lost, forgotten world, resurrecting the past from the dust and ashes of time and space to speak vividly and directly for new generations. I warmly recommned this book to anyone it will certainly always hold a special place on my shelf. If only I could give it an infinite number of stars!!! ...