The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them and Empower Your Team

The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them and Empower Your Team

by John C. Maxwell

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

“There is no ‘i’ in “team.’” “No man is an island.” “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.” You may roll your eyes at these age-old clichés, but you can’t afford to breeze over their point. Individual all-stars can only take you so far. Ultimately, success—whether in business, family, church, athletic teams, or any other organization—is entirely dependent on teamwork. But how does one build that team? Leadership expert and New York Times bestselling author John C. Maxwell knows that building and maintaining a successful team is no simple task. Even people who have taken their teams to the highest level in their field have difficulty re-creating what accounted for their successes. So in The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork, Maxwell shares the vital principles of team building that are necessary for success in any type of organization. In his practical, down-to-earth style, Dr. Maxwell shows how:• The Law of High Morale inspired a 50-year-old man who couldn't even swim to train for the toughest triathlon in the world.• The Law of the Big Picture prompted a former US president to travel across the country by bus, sleep in a basement, and do manual labor.• Playing by The Law of the Scoreboard enabled one web-based company to keep growing and make money while thousands of other Internet businesses failed.• Ignoring The Law of the Price Tag caused one of the world's largest retailers to close its doors after 128 years in business.• And so much more!Building a successful team has plagued leaders since the beginning of time. Is the key a strong work ethic? Is it “chemistry”? The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork will empower you—whether coach or player, teacher or student, CEO or non-profit volunteer—with the “how-tos“ and attitudes for building a successful team.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400204731
Publisher: HarperCollins Leadership
Publication date: 04/01/2013
Series: John C. Maxwell's Laws Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 265
Sales rank: 145,356
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

John C. Maxwell is a #1 New York Times bestselling author, coach, and speaker who has sold more than 31 million books in fifty languages. He has been identified as the #1 leader in business by the American Management Association® and the most influential leadership expert in the world by Business Insider and Inc. magazine. He is the founder of The John Maxwell Company, The John Maxwell Team, EQUIP, and the John Maxwell Leadership Foundation, organizations that have trained millions of leaders from every country of the world. A recipient of the Horatio Alger Award, as well as the Mother Teresa Prize for Global Peace and Leadership from the Luminary Leadership Network, Dr. Maxwell speaks each year to Fortune 500 companies, presidents of nations, and many of the world’s top business leaders. He can be followed at Twitter.com/JohnCMaxwell. For more information about him visit JohnMaxwell.com.

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The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them and Empower Your Team 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Building on the successful formula of his earlier work, author John C. Maxwell (The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership) has delineated 17 'laws' for managers who want to develop successful teams. That number may be arbitrary, but Maxwell successfully uses his laws as a springboard to weave together inspiring tales from Navy Seals, mountain climbers, Colin Powell, George Washington, Jimmy Carter, major league coaches and others into punchy chapters that any aspiring leader can use. This book provides the right mix of factoids, inspiration and leadership pointers to make it a bestseller. Even better, coaches and leaders who use these tips should be able to build better teams. We recommend this book to coaches, mentors and team leaders.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Maxwell has taken on a very difficult challenge in this book. He looks at effective teams from the perspective of being a better team member, playing various roles in a successful team, and being a team leader . . . all in the same book! If you are like me, you will feel that he has carried off the challenge well. The format of the book will be familiar to those who have read Dr. Maxwell's excellent leadership books. In this case, there are 17 laws, with each one being comprised of additional elements. Each law has one or two overriding examples, and then many small examples . . . usually as one for each subpoint. At the end of each law's section, you have questions to answer and assignments to do. This aspect of the book is like having a workbook to help you begin to apply the lessons to your own situation. The book begins with a key question, 'Will your involvement with others be successful?' In emphasizing that all 17 laws are important, Dr. Maxwell starts out with an anecdote about how a young leader absolutely insisted on knowing what one thing was most important about teams. Dr. Maxwell thought and told the young man that it was that there was no one most important thing about teams. In the end, the same point is made by observing that good chemistry (not one of the 17 laws) only occurs on a team when all 17 laws are being observed. Here is my rephrasing of the 17 laws: (1) By combining their efforts and talents, teams can outperform any individual. Anyone who has seen a great player brought down by a special effort from the opposing team will know the truth of that observation. (2) Team players have to subordinate their self-interests on behalf of the team's purpose. In the NBA, the teams with ball hogs don't win championships. I find that this law is violated more often than it is followed. (3) Each team player can add a greater contribution when in the correct role. If you turned a great linebacker into a tight end, the results usually wouldn't be as good. (4) The more difficult the goal, the more important the teamwork. The example used here is climbing Mount Everest and the hard work that dozens of people have to do so that two people can climb atop the peak. Most teams suffer from having weak or inappropriate goals. Spend time on this area . . . and take on something worth doing! (5) The team's results will only be as good as the performance of the weakest person. The poor leadership by the captain of the Exxon Valdez is used as an example. (6) People on the team have to find ways to spark the team on to greater accomplishment. Michael Jordan during his years with the Bulls is the example. (7) Teams need a vision of what needs to be accomplished to inform and inspire their efforts. If the company leader doesn't do this, then someone on the team must. IBM's improved marketing under Lou Gerstner's time as CEO is the key example. (8) Bad attitudes can spoil great talent. You are better building great attitudes on the team than having great talent. Ideally, you should try to have both. (9) Team members need to be able to rely on one another. Many people have trouble either trusting others or being trustworthy. Many teams find that exercises can help. There is a terrific example of demolishing the Omni in Atlanta using explosives that makes this point well. (10) Be prepared to make the necessary sacrifices to do what needs to be done. Most people know what should be done, but are not able to discipline themselves or the team to get there. The book describes the opportunity that Montgomery Ward missed to become a retail department store ahead of Sears in the early 20th century. (11) Keep track of your progress to focus your attention. Think of this as keeping score. When you are not meeting your quantitative goals, you should adapt. (12) You need to have lots of people who can play the same roles. When one person isn't being effective, you should substitute. This give
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Guest More than 1 year ago
From the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Sunday, August 21, 2005: Jeff Francoeur (Atlanta Braves rookie sensation) favors books with a spiritual perspective such as 'The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork' by Atlanta author John Maxwell, which he bookmarked with his major league players card. Recently he bought 'The Best Question Ever' by Atlanta pastor Andy Stanley to keep in his locker. (From the AJC article, Life in 'Francoeur-ner')
Guest More than 1 year ago
John Maxwell has managed to cross the bridge between church and industry when providing special insights into leadership and teamwork. Maxwell's works, including this one, tend draw heavily from the world of sports to draw analogical illustrations of principles which, unfortunately, tend to distract from the meat of the message. Otherwise, Maxwell's presentation is far superior to the flaky and superficial motivational books so popular on today's American scene.