1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America

1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America

by David Pietrusza

Hardcover

$24.95

Overview

The behind-the-headline true story of Harry Truman's stunning upset!

Everyone knows the iconic news photo of jubilant underdog Harry Truman brandishing a copy of the Chicago Tribune proclaiming “DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN.” David Pietrusza goes backstage to explain how it happened, placing the brutal political battle in the context of an erupting Cold War and America's exploding storms over civil rights and domestic communism.

Pietrusza achieves for 1948's presidential race what he previously did in his acclaimed 1960--LBJ vs. JFK vs. Nixon: bringing history to life and intrigue readers with tales of high drama while simultaneously presenting the issues, personalities, and controversies of this pivotal era with laser-like clarity.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781402767487
Publisher: Union Square Press
Publication date: 10/04/2011
Pages: 544
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.90(d)

About the Author

David Pietrusza, is the author of 1960--LBJ vs. JFK vs. Nixon: The Epic Campaign That Forged Three Presidencies; 1920: The Year of the Six Presidents; and Rothstein: The Life, Times and Murder of the Criminal Genius Who Fixed the 1919 World Series.

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1948 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
troutrivers More than 1 year ago
Interesting read - Dewey as a 'shoe in' yet he actually drew fewer votes vs. Truman than he had vs. Roosevelt 4 years earlier.
Schmerguls on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this author's book on the 1960 election on 25 Nov 2008 and enjoyed it so much that when I saw he had a book on the 1948 election I knew I had to read it. It is almost as enjoyable as the book on the 1960 election, and I enjoyed it a lot more than I enjoyed living the political year 1948, since during most of that year I looked forward to the November election with fearful gloom. As I read this book I knew that no matter how desperate things looked November would be a giddily great time. I think the author pays a bit more attention to the Wallace candidacy than necessary, but I have no other complaint about what he covers in the book. There are a few minor errors I noted: On page 90 he says Harold Stassen was the youngest govenor ever, but he is wrong--there was a Governor of Michigan, Stevens T. Mason, who was elected when 24 and re-elected when 26, and California's J. Neely Johnson was elected governor in 1855 when he was 30. Stassen was 31 when elected governor of Minnesota in 1938. (the fourth youngest governor ever was Bill Clinton--32 when elected governor in 1978.) And on page 220 the author says the Barkley-Chandler primary contest was in 1936 but it was, as even I remebered, in 1938. And on page 247 he refers to Seantor Chad Gurney but he should have known it was Senator Chan Gurney he meant. I suppose the book is not as elegantly written as some political histories but it was sure great reading of that amazing year.
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