365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life

365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life

by John Kralik
3.8 38

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365 Thank Yous 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
jewelknits More than 1 year ago
John Kralik was "that" friend - you know the one you ask, "Hey! How's it goin'?" and they launch into a litany of everything that is going wrong in their lives? Yeah; that was who and how he was. He WAS going through a lot at the beginning of this book: on the verge of losing his business due to non-paying clients; losing his lease; going through his second divorce; living in a cruddy apartment while paying the mortgages on both his first and second wives' houses; and his girlfriend had just broken up with him.<br> But in his introspection and growth throughout this book, we see how he realizes that even when things were going ostensibly well, he focused on the negative. At this lowest point in his life, he decides to make a conscious effort to utilize the office stationery (no longer good, since the office is moving and he doesn't yet know where) to write thank you notes and express gratitude for what he DOES have. He calls his older son to get his mailing address so he can send him a thank you for his recent Christmas present; as a result of the call, they make a lunch appointment together, and his son unexpectedly pays back a loan.<br> This is a real-life story, so obviously just sending thank you notes didn't make EVERYthing all better, but it DID have a snowball effect in a lot of ways, and caused the author to learn and grow. An illustration of how simple acts of gratitude can lead to better things.
Halflete More than 1 year ago
I loved this book and wish I had it in hard copy so I could pass it around to all of my friends. I think it is inspiration and teaches us to be grateful for what we have.
DMoonPie1 More than 1 year ago
I wasn't sure what to expect after I saw John Kralik on Good Morning America in December as he promoted his book. He appeared to be somewhat nervous during the interview. I threw caution to the wind and decided to order the book since I'm working on my own gratitude thing. After reading the book, I now more than understand his nervousness. Keep on reading... "...I discovered that I had been misspelling the word grateful - as greatful - for my entire life. Because I had used the word so infrequently, no one had ever pointed this out." All I can say now is boy am I grateful I purchased this little book!! It is not at all what I had envisioned. I had envisioned a book with 365 thank you notes with an anecdote to follow. What I received instead was John Kralik's personal story of how he was once an angry, 50-something curmudgeon who thought life was handing him one bad thing after another. Woe is me. Kralik finally stopped long enough to hear his inner voice and listen to his heart. As I read this book I would occasionally cringe as Mr. Kralik would note how he had not been grateful in the past, thereby reminding me of times in my past when I should have been more grateful and gone out of my way to thank that person in my life. Thank you for the reminder, John Kralik. I will certainly do better in the future. "Originally, I viewed this difficulty as arising out of the difficulties of my life. Anyone, I had thought, would have found the exercise a challenge if they had had my problems. Yet three hundred notes disproved this premise. The difficulty of the exercise had been caused not only by external problems but by my own ungrateful focus, my materialistic envy and resentment....With the help of my three hundred thank-you notes, I had examined the life I had viewed as perfectly awful and found that it was a lot better than I had been willing to acknowledge. Maybe I was not such as bad person after all." Kralik takes his readers on his personal journey as he finds gratitude and grace in his life. Maybe it was his mid-life crisis? Albeit, this was not your typical 'let me get a sports car and have some fun' kind of mid-life crisis, but a deep and personal crisis. As the story begins almost everything is lost to Kralik, his business is in the tank, he has alienated his two older children, and he has been twice divorced and is living in a temperamental, crappy little apartment (you have to read the book) with his young daughter. "To me, it seemed that Scott and I had forged a tiny bit of human warmth in this eroding wasteland." During a nature hike on New Year's Day, Kralik finally takes the time to listen to his inner voice, and then begins the task of writing a thank-you note every day for the next 365 days. As he writes his notes to his children, old friends, doctors, ex-spouses, employees, service people, landlord, the Starbucks guy, etc. he begins to notice a change. He notices that he is suddenly being rewarded with the unexpected; Kralik is being rewarded with kindness, love, respect, and even repayment on outstanding loans. His note writing builds a bridge back to the man John Kralik always wanted to be, not the bitter middle-aged man who tended to place blame on everyone else for the course his life had taken. "This teacher looked at me differently after that. First of all, she remembered me. Whether she had ever looked at me with a skeptical or adverse judgement
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be very inspirational. It was an easy and quick read and very uplifting. A story of remembering to appreciate the people and things you have in you life.
Elsie_Brooks More than 1 year ago
I was excited to read 365 Thank Yous. I expected to be inspired by John Kralik's gratitude; instead, I found Kralik to be selfish. He is a lot like the title character from the television sitcom "My Name is Earl." Like Earl who tries to make peace with Karma, not for the good of others, but, to make things better for himself, Kralik expresses gratitude in hopes of getting something back. Kralik's grandfather taught him this lesson by rewarding a thank you note for a silver dollar with another silver dollar. Kralik has to search for reasons to be thankful and then he writes about the reward that came from his "gratitude."
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LeighVW More than 1 year ago
I rarely quit reading a book but I made an exception. As other reviews noted, this man appeared fixated on the money aspect of good will. Attorneys are as attorneys are
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