A Body in Berkeley Square

A Body in Berkeley Square

by Ashley Gardner, Jennifer Ashley

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781946455451
Publisher: JA / AG Publishing
Publication date: 12/07/2018
Series: Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries , #5
Pages: 276
Sales rank: 687,295
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.62(d)

About the Author

Ashley Gardner is the pseudonym of New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Ashley.

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A Body in Berkeley Square 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book in one day,it kept me turning the page to see what would happen next. The whole series is great .
bookworm11SD More than 1 year ago
I've really enjoyed reading the Captain Lacey series. When I found this series on B&N, several titles were available. I purchased and read all of them in quick succession. But now I'm on a monthly ration. The newer re-release titles are available one per month. Sometimes a month is just too long! I know the stories will have to end at some point, but I hope it's not for a while longer.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1817, former military Sergeant turned Bow St. runner Milton Pomeroy shows Captain Gabriel Lacey the corpse of Henry Turner stabbed to death with the knife in his chest. Milton explains that the body was removed from the crime scene in order to not interfere with the crème de crème ball hosted by Lord Gillis. Upon seeing the murder weapon Lacey knows it belongs to Colonel Aloysius Brandon, who won it from him in a Peninsular card game. --- Lacey detests his former friend and superior officer Brandon, who previously told Pomeroy he has no idea how his knife ended up in Turner¿s chest. The sleuth is tempted to let the Colonel take the fall as he knows he could make a case since Brandon had the opportunity and the means, and a motive shortly surfaces too. Will Lacey ¿settle¿ on Brandon, who everyone from the Earl hosting the ball to Pomeroy assumes committed the homicide? By doing so Lacey would avenge several affronts Brandon did to him or will he seek justice by continuing his investigations? His traitorous gut tells him the Colonel is being framed with too much easily available proof for someone as diabolical as Brandon has become. --- The latest Captain Lacy Regency police procedural, A BODY IN BERKELEY SQUARE, is a fabulous who-done-it starring an ethical hero who faces a moral dilemma as he finally has the opportunity, the means and the motive to get away with vengeance. The who-done-it is so cleverly devised that crime scene investigators would cherish working such a case. However, the key to this strong entry in one of the best historical mystery series in recent years remains how hard Lacey is trying to uncover the identity of the killer. --- Harriet Klausner
kronan1 More than 1 year ago
OMG  They keep getting better and better........................................................................ First of all kudos to the author for putting the number on the books.   It makes it that much easier to read the books in order.  I'm up to 5 and so far they have all been  terrific...   But Iin the last one I thought the characters of Captain Brandon and Louisa were getting a little tiresome.  Wrong.  This whole book centers on them and turns out to be another great mystery.  I'm so glad I found this series.  Way above average.
Readletter More than 1 year ago
I love all of the Captain Lacey stories. In fact, I think I'm in love with Captain Lacey. Can't wait until the next book.
juglicerr on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is one of the other sides of all those Regency novels I read: Captain Lacey is one of the half-pay officers that match-making mamas try to keep their daughters away from. He is also a man of great integrity, deep feeling, and an unfortunate tendency to lose his temper.Ashley Gardner is succeeding at something very difficult here. Her character is flawed, in some ways more admirable than likeable. It's a very fine line that Gardner is walking successfully. Lacey often does things that are dumb, but they are so well handled as to be part of a full human being, not cheap plot devices. I was afraid that the character James Denis was going to ruin this book by turning it into a melodrama, but a this point, I think the author is up to the task on maintaining it as a side plot, without lurching into bathos.Lacey has left the military after a dispute with his beloved and despised former mentor and commanding officer that resulted in a permanent injury to his leg. He has a respectable (but not noble) lineage, but no private income, so he has settled into cheap quarters. He has made friends with some of the ton, as well as lower class people such as an actress and his old sergeant, now a Bow Street Runner. This enables him to view society at many levels, as well as enlist the forces of the law, such as they were in those days, in his investigations.The supporting cast contains many well-developed characters with idiosyncracies and lives outside of being his sidekicks. Their relationships with Lacey and one another are sometimes complex. I also like that Lacey's life develops: he makes new friends, takes jobs, romances women and worries about his long-eloped wife and daughter. So often, series characters get stuck in a rut of repeating circumstances, but that doesn't seem to be a danger here.As a matter of taste, these novels are somewhat melancholy, but goodness triumphs often enough so that they don't get morbid. The victims and perpetrators vary as to how sympathetic they are.I am keeping all my volumes in this series, because I know that I will want to go back and reread as I go along. The reader who likes these may like these other novels, similarly of people skirtng the boundry between the middle-class and the gentry:T.F. Banks' Memoirs of a Bow Street Runner (beginning with The Thief Taker) set in the same period;Set in the last half of the 18th century are:Hannah March's series about tutor Robert Fairfax, (I believe Complaint of the Dove is first);Bruce Alexander's Bow Street Magistrate Sir John Fielding series, from about the same time (Blind Justice is first);Robert Lee Hall's American Agent Series, featuring Benjamin Franklin, (Benjamin Franklin takes the Case is first).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the Captain Lacey mysteries! Keep them coming!
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I have all in this series and theyre VERY GOOD. Hope more to come!
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ElizabethT More than 1 year ago
Great Mystery Series! Must Read! Can't wait for more!
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