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A Celebration of Heirloom Vegetables: Growing and Cooking Old-Time Varieties
     

A Celebration of Heirloom Vegetables: Growing and Cooking Old-Time Varieties

by Roger B. Yepsen, Roger B. Yepsen
 

A friendly guide to more than 200 classic heirloom varieties:
  • Tips on growing, harvesting, and saving seeds
  • Dozens of healthful, innovative recipes
  • Profiles of such traditional favorites as Speckled Blue Tepary beans and Russian Banana potatoes
  • Ethnic favorites, from northern Italian chicories and Southwestern peppers, to French salad greens and
  • Overview


    A friendly guide to more than 200 classic heirloom varieties:

  • Tips on growing, harvesting, and saving seeds
  • Dozens of healthful, innovative recipes
  • Profiles of such traditional favorites as Speckled Blue Tepary beans and Russian Banana potatoes
  • Ethnic favorites, from northern Italian chicories and Southwestern peppers, to French salad greens and East European tomatoes
  • Mail-order seed sources
  • Help in tracking down varieties from backyard gardens around the world

  • Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9781885183880
    Publisher:
    Artisan
    Publication date:
    10/01/1998
    Pages:
    192
    Product dimensions:
    10.14(w) x 10.24(h) x 0.85(d)

    Read an Excerpt


    BEAN COMPANIONS

    While you're preparing to plant beans, consider buying seed for two easily grown herbs that have long been associated with them, summer savory and epazote. Summer savory can be used fresh or dried in bean dishes, and its presence in the garden has been credited with encouraging the growth of nearby beans. In acknowledgement of the association of these two plants, German markets offer green beans tied in bundles with a few sprigs of Bohnenkraut, or bean-leaf, as summer savory is known. Epazote is a curiously scented herb used in Mexican bean cuisine, for both flavor and its reputed powers as a digestive. In India, asafetida and ginger are used to spice bean dishes for the same seasons.

    BLUE TEPARY BEAN SALAD

    Small, colorfully speckled tepary beans look like tiny bird egs. Their distinctive, nutty flavor is best shown off in simple dishes in which they can shine.

    2 cups tepary beans

    3 tablespoons olive oil

    1 tablespoon tamari

    Juice of 1 lemon

    1 tablespoon wine vinegar

    3 tablespoons chopped parsley

    6 cherry tomatoes, cut into thin wedges

    Soak the beans overnight. Drain, cover with fresh water, and simmer until tender but not mushy.

    Drain the cooked beans and put them in a bowl with the remaining ingredients, stirring well to distribute them. Let stand for at least 1 hour before serving. Refrigerate for longer periods, but allow the salad to come back to room temperature.

    Excerpted from A Celebration of Heirloom Vegetables. Copyright c 1998 by Roger Yepsen. Reprinted by permission of Artisan.

    Meet the Author


    Roger Yepsen is an artist, writer, gardener, and editor. He is author and illustrator of Apples and is currently at work on a book about berries. Most of the vegetables captured in Heirloom's watercolors are grown on his colonial-era Pennsylvania farm, where he lives with his wife and children.

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