A Dialog On Polygamy

A Dialog On Polygamy

Paperback

$12.96 $13.95 Save 7% Current price is $12.96, Original price is $13.95. You Save 7%.

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

A Dialog On Polygamy by Bernardino Ochino

In, A Dialog on Polygamy, the Famous Italian Reformer; Bernardino Ochino, presents both sides of the argument, and it's HILARIOUS! Ochino plays the part of a sixteenth century priest, which he was, while Telypolygamus plays the part of the advocate for polygamy. On December 2, 1563, Ochino was exiled from Germany for publishing this work. Some say the German Reformation ended that day. He and his children were sent out into the harsh elements where three of them died of the plague. Ochino died a year later.
In addition to the original translation, I've included my own modern font version which includes many editorial changes. You'll notice that I've introduced the nicknames Ochy and Tely for the characters. I find this preferable to identifying them with letters. If you're a purist, please, read the old font version. To find the old font version, open the book just beyond the middle. The pages are numbered the same in both versions to make cross referencing easier.
Had Bernardino Ochino not been exiled for writing on polygamy, he might have had more to say on the subject. Certainly there is more to say and I have done so in many of my own books. If you enjoy dialogs such as Ochino's, I've written a novel titled Prince of Sumba, Husband to Many Wives. Its characters argue for and against polygamy, I must admit; mostly for it.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780982537527
Publisher: Born Again Publishing, Inc.
Publication date: 04/01/2009
Pages: 140
Product dimensions: 0.33(w) x 8.00(h) x 5.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

A Dialog On Polygamy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
PastorDonMilton More than 1 year ago
In 'A Dialog on Polygamy' the Famous Italian Reformer; Bernardino Ochino, presents both sides of the polygamy argument, and it's hilarious! This book contains both the modern font version (with minor variations in the wording to make it easier for the modern reader) and the 18th century version for purists. That version was first printed in 1732 and again in 1736. I've personally seen both versions and they're identical. This particular reproduction is from the 1736 version. What is of note is that there is none of the markings typical of reproductions. This book is immaculate. The page numbering is mirrored in the new and old versions to make cross referencing easier. Beyond the interesting topic this book provides, it's a useful teaching aid for those learning 18th century fonts. An earlier version of A Dialog on Polygamy was translated but it lacks the unique flow of English prose that this one contains.