A Field Guide to Your Own Backyard: A Seasonal Guide to the Flora and Fauna of the Eastern U. S.

A Field Guide to Your Own Backyard: A Seasonal Guide to the Flora and Fauna of the Eastern U. S.

Paperback(Second Edition)

$15.95

Overview

A wise and poetic field guide to the lives, habits, and quirks of the natural world awaiting just beyond your doorstep .


"If there is grass and a few scraggling trees, there will be wildlife," suggests John Hanson Mitchell, an internationally recognized naturalist and advocate for tuning your senses to the wonders that await in your own backyard. Whether your yard consists of a small patch of grass or a rambling mix of forest and field, Mitchell will introduce you to the wealth of plants, insects, and animals that share your patch of the planet.


You'll learn how the behavior at the birdfeeder mirrors that of the deepest woods. You'll get a gander at the rich ecology of the woodpile. You'll get to know the neighbors you never knew you had who make their homes under the bark and in the holes of the trees. You'll learn why you might want to welcome a skunk into your garden. With wisdom and gentle humor, this book reacquaints you with the denizens of your own local habitat.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780881504743
Publisher: Countryman Press, The
Publication date: 06/05/2006
Edition description: Second Edition
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

John Hanson Mitchell is the author of several books, including A Field
Guide to Your Own Backyard (Countryman) and Ceremonial Time, and the editor of the award-winning natural history/environmental journal
Sanctuary, published by the Massachusetts Audubon Society. He lives and gardens in Littleton, MA.

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A Field Guide to Your Own Backyard: A Seasonal Guide to the Flora and Fauna of the Eastern U. S. 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
aulsmith on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This books is arranged by season and talks about plants and animals you might observe in your back yard if you live in the Eastern United States. Unlike a real field guide, it's kind of scatter shot. While it tells how to go about observing the animals and plants it discusses, it doesn't tell you how to find out about the random things you might observe on your own. There's definitely useful information here, especially for older children and adults who haven't spent a lot of time observing nature. However, if you want to know how to figure out who's digging the holes that appear in your lawn in the spring, you need a different book.