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Funk Odyssey
     

A Funk Odyssey

4.2 4
by Jamiroquai
 

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Following in the footsteps of their breakthrough disc, 1997's Travelling without Moving, and rebounding from the less-than-stellar commercial welcome they received with 1999's Synkronized, British R&B group Jamiroquai break their two-year silence with A Funk Odyssey -- a disc

Overview

Following in the footsteps of their breakthrough disc, 1997's Travelling without Moving, and rebounding from the less-than-stellar commercial welcome they received with 1999's Synkronized, British R&B group Jamiroquai break their two-year silence with A Funk Odyssey -- a disc deep in retro-soul grooves and thoughtful lyrics. Still sounding like Stevie Wonder's love child, frontman Jay Kay strikes a balance between the electro-funk of "Feel So Good" and airier fare such as the meditative, bossa nova-flavored "Picture of My Life." Other songs that point to a kinder, gentler Jamiroquai are the ballad "Black Crow," with its strings and soaring harmonies, and the spiritual, Latin-brushed "Corner of the Earth." Jamiroquai also get their funk groove on with smoking cuts such as the bottom-heavy jam "You Give Me Something" and "Main Event," a blaxploitation-inspired track accented by darting strings, disco diva vocals, and runaway wah-wah guitar. After a decade on the music scene, Jamiroquai still haven't missed a beat and they continue to provide hipsters with some of the most invigorating, and soulful, excursions to the dance floor.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - MacKenzie Wilson
After the jarring reception of 1999's Synkronized, Jamiroquai constructed A Funk Odyssey, something more polished and slick inside the band's own brand of funky disco-rock. Jason Kay and keyboardist/songwriter Toby Smith perfected a maturation that was left keyed in Travelling Without Moving but left open-ended on Synkronized for a wide scope of musical delight. A Funk Odyssey taps into various illustrious grooves of the Latin world, classic rock, and mainstream club culture, and Jamiroquai is tight and eager to make everyone shake their groove thing in their own light. The first single, "Little L," beams with Kajagoogoo-like synths while warping into a funk-driven hue of orchestral whirlpools, but Jamiroquai allows the band's extroverted and unattached personality to shine on the worldbeat-tinged "Corner of the Earth." Kay strips aside all disco humor and grandeur for something personally inviting, something that's heartfelt, too. A Funk Odyssey sparks classic enthusiasm, and it feels good. Dance music is not just a design, it's something far more tangible, and Jamiroquai surely captures a fierce desire to make it more emotional on the band's own level.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/11/2001
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0696998595422
catalogNumber:
85954

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A Funk Odyssey 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jamiroquai take you in an other world... Very good songs!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jamiroquai's fifth album, while solid, is in my opinion the worst of the bunch. It appears that Jay Kay has listened to too much Daft Punk and has decided to take his band into the art of robo-funk. That's all well and good but the band's soul is sacrificed in the process. Wallis Buchanan, the digeridoo player, got axed for this project, along with DJ D-Zire Darren Galea. Most of the beats are programmed too, so drummer Derrick McKenzie's contribution to AFO is sadly reduced. Fortunately, the backbone that has kept the band funkin' for more than a decade is still sound. Bassist Nick Fyffe, in what turns out to be his final performance with the band (he left in 2003 during the Midnight Sun Tour in Europe), plays fantastically as well as his electric guitar counterpart, Rob Harris. But one must believe that this sounds like Jamiroquai THE MAN, and not Jamiroquai THE BAND. I can only hope that the band returns with more of a live flavor on their next album. JK said that this was an evolution of Jamiroquai's sound, going to the computerized beats more. Sorry, but in my opinion, this is evolution gone awry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jamiroquai's newest creation is the best from the band to date. The tracts ''Love Foolsoophy'' and ''Main Vein'' reflect the classic sound of Jamiroquai but I never get bored listening to it . ''Corrner of the Earth'' and ''Picture of my Life'' make me feel as if I am having a personal conversation with a good friend. ''2001'' and ''Black Crow'' relay the feelngs of a desperate people looking for answers. Overall the CD is upbeat and has lyrics of deep meaning that anyone can relate to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago