A History of Russian Literature

A History of Russian Literature

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780199663941
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 06/19/2018
Pages: 960
Product dimensions: 9.80(w) x 7.20(h) x 2.80(d)

About the Author

Andrew Kahn, St Edmund Hall, Oxford, Mark Lipovetsky, University of Colorado-Boulder, Irina Reyfman, Columbia University, Stephanie Sandler, Harvard University

Andrew Kahn is Professor of Russian Literature at the University of Oxford. He has published widely on Russian Enlightenment literature and on Russian poetry, including Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence (OUP, 2008, pbk. 2012). His studies often focus on the interplay between the history of ideas and how writers think with literature.

Mark Lipovetsky is Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder (USA). He is the author of nine books on Russian literature and culture including Paralogies: Transformations of the (Post)Modernist Discourse in Russian Culture of the 1920s-2000s (2008), Performing Violence: Literary and Theatrical Experiments of New Russian Drama (with Birgit Beumers), Charms of Cynical Reason: The Trickster's Transformations in Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture (2011), and Postmodern Crises: From Lolita to Pussy Riot (2017). He has co-edited a volume of Dictionary of Literary Biography: Russian Writers Since 1980 (2003), such anthologies as Politicizing Magic: Russian and Soviet Fairy Tales (2005), 50 Writers: An Anthology of the Twentieth-Century Russian Short Story (2011), Late Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Literature (in 2 vols., 2014, 2015), and such collections of articles as Veselye chelovechki: Cult Heroes of Soviet Childhood (2008), A Non-Canonical Classic: D. A. Prigov (2010), and Russian Literature since 1991 (CUP, 2015).

Irina Reyfman is Professor of Russian Literature at Columbia University. In her studies, Reyfman focuses on the interaction of literature and culture, examining both how literature reacts to cultural phenomena and how it contributes to the formation of cultural biases and forms of behavior. Reyfman is the author of How Russia Learned to Write: Literature and the Imperial Table of Rannks (Madison, Wisconsin, 2016), Vasilii Trediakovsky: The Fool of the 'New' Russian Literature (Stanford, 1990), and Ritualized Violence Russian Style: The Duel in Russian Culture and Literature (Stanford, 1999); the latter book also appeared in Russian (Moscow: Novoe Literaturnoe obozrenie, 2002). She is also a co-editor (with Catherine T. Nepomnyashchy and Hilde Hoogenboom) of Mapping the Feminine: Russian Women and Cultural Difference (Bloomington, IN: Slavica, 2008).

Stephanie Sandler is the Ernest E. Monrad Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University. She has written on Pushkin and later myths about him, including Distant Pleasures: Alexander Pushkin and the Writing of Exile (1989) and Commemorating Pushkin: Russia's Myth of a National Poet (2004). Other interests include ideas of selfhood and identity in Russian literature and film, which led to a co-edited volume, Self and Story in Russian History (2000, with Laura Engelstein); and questions of sex and gender, subject of another edited volume, Sexuality and the Body in Russian Culture (1993, 1998, with Jane Costlow and Judith Vowles). She has co-edited a pioneering collection of essays on the contemporary poet Olga Sedakova, published in Russia in 2017 and due out in English with University of Wisconsin Press.

Table of Contents

PART I. THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD
Institutions and contexts: writing and authorship, 1100-1400
Holy Russia: landmarks in medieval literature
Local narratives
PART II. THE EARLY MODERN: THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
Paradise Lost: National narratives
Cultural interface: printing, Humanist learning and Orthodox resistance in the second half of the seventeenth century
Court theater
Poets
Prose
PART III. THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Defining Classicism: the canons of taste
Institutions of writing and authorship
National narratives
Poetics and subjectivities between Classicism and Romanticism
Prose fiction
PART IV. THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Institutions
The Literary Field: from amateur societies to professional institutions and literary alliances
Subjectivities
Forms of Prose
Literary identity and social structure of the Imperial period
Types: Heroes and anti-heroes
Heroines and emancipation
Narratives of nation-building
PART V. THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES
Institutions
The Poetics of Subjectivity
The Poetics of Language
Prose and Drama: negotiations with history
Catastrophic narratives
Intelligentsia narratives

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