Journey to the Centre of the Earth

Journey to the Centre of the Earth

by Jules Verne

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Overview

As irascible scholar Professor Lidenbrock pores over a rare Icelandic tome, he discovers a scrap of parchment with cryptic writing tucked away between the ancient pages. And when his nephew, Axel, finally breaks the writing's secret code, he learns of a hidden underground passageway that may lead deep into the center of the earth. Despite Axel's misgivings, he and the obsessed Lidenbrock travel to Iceland and, with a guide named Hans, set out on a perilous expedition in the course of which the trio will encounter an extraordinary new world of extinct yet living species, an underground sea, and gigantic, battling monsters.Filled with the authentic detail and startling immediacy Jules Verne labored to bring to 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and Around the World in Eighty Days, Journey to the Center of the Earth is the fantastic adventure that secured Verne's reputation as the premier writer of speculative fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780368672668
Publisher: Blurb, Inc.
Publication date: 04/25/2019
Pages: 290
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.61(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

French author Jules Verne was born in the port of Nantes in 1828. He later moved to Paris to study law. At age twenty-eight, he married Honorine de Viane, a young widow with two children. Verne published several plays under the tutelage of Victor Hugo and Alexandre Dumas. He made his living as a stockbroker until his first successful series, Voyages Extraordinaire, was published in 1863. Soon Verne's novels became enormously popular around the world. Without a scientific background or experiences as a traveler, Verne spent much of his time doing research for his books. However, when the logic of the story contradicted scientific knowledge, Verne took poetic license with science to serve his fast-paced adventures. Verne's stories caught the spirit of the nineteenth century and its uncritical enthusiasm about scientific progress and invention. His works were often written in the form of a travel book taking the readers on fantastic voyages. Many of Verne's ideas have been hailed as prophetic, predicting some of the inventions that have changed our world, including the airplane, the submarine, and spacecraft. He published sixty-five novels, some twenty short stories and essays, thirty plays, an opera libretto and two geographical works. In the first part of his career Verne expressed optimism about progress and Europe's central role in the social and technical development of the world. In Verne's later novels, the author's pessimism is reflected in the doom-laden fin-de-siècle atmosphere. In contrast to the adventurous spirit of his novels, Verne's personal life was relatively uneventful, with the exception of his surviving a murder attempt by his insane nephew. Verne died of natural causes in Amiens on March 24, 1905.

Bill Homewood is a television, voice actor, and an Earphones Award–winning audiobook narrator. He has regularly appeared on such shows as Coronation Street, The Adventure Game, and The Talisman.

Date of Birth:

February 8, 1828

Date of Death:

March 24, 1905

Place of Birth:

Nantes, France

Place of Death:

Amiens, France

Education:

Nantes lycée and law studies in Paris

Read an Excerpt

I
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Journey to the Centre of the Earth"
by .
Copyright © 2009 Jules Verne.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

1. Deciphering Arne Saknussemm’s parchment does not come easily to Professor Lidenbrock, the profound analyst. Indeed, Verne has shown us, right from the start, that he will not take his audience’s suspension of disbelief for granted. Discuss the role of logic in the novel; how does Verne’s meticulous manipulation of science and history increase the believability–and ultimately the reader’s enjoyment–of the adventure?

2. Dwelling on their shared hardships, Axel says, “My uncle bore them like a man who is angry with himself for yielding to weakness: Hans, with the resignation of his placid nature; and I, to speak the truth, complaining and despairing the whole time. I could not bear up against this stroke of ill-fortune.” Compare Professor Lidenbrock, Axel, and Hans in terms of intellect, bravery, determination, and humor. How does each of their personal skills come into play in times of crisis, and how do their shortcomings complicate the journey? Does Hans, the Icelandic guide of superhuman devotion, even have a weakness? If not, how does this affect your evaluation of him as a whole character?

3. Ingenuity and adaptability are vital to the explorers’ success. Trace the many instances of resourcefulness in the novel, considering the adventurers’ ingenious use of simple phenomena such as gravity, acoustics, and natural propulsion. How does this relate to David Brin’s assertion in the Introduction: “Destiny– readers learned–was something you might craft with your own clever hands.”

4. The long and often monotonous trek down to the earth’s core poses some plot challenges for Verne. With only three characters, one goal, and little change in scenery, how does Verne create suspense in order to sustain the reader’s interest?

5. Compare the competing characterizations of science in the novel: “When science has spoken, it is for us to hold our peace” versus “Science is eminently perfectible.” Discuss how Verne’s novel can be read as a tribute to scientific progress and the pluck of the explorer who contradicts accepted fact in search of greater truths.

6. Describe Axel’s sublime hallucination on the subterranean ocean and the “abyss attraction” which overtakes him earlier in his descent. Why is Axel particularly affected by the romantic conception of the sublime?

7. How is Gräuben a “necessary” character, not only in the beginning but throughout the novel? Evaluate Brin’s assertion in the Introduction that “science fictional women tend to be bolder than their eras, and science fictional men seem to like it that way.”

8. Describe the subterranean world that the journeyers discover. How does Verne account for the underground ocean and the blanched species of flora and fauna? Did Verne’s exposition of this primitive world meet your expectations? What surprises would have been in store in your own imaginative rendering of this peculiar environment?

9. How can Journey to the Centre of the Earth be interpreted as a psychological quest? Consider the roles of ambition, despair, and hope in the novel. Is the journey ultimately more important than the final outcome?

10. Jules Verne’s extraordinary tales continue to fascinate readers because they capture the thrill of the unknown. In his Introduction, David Brin writes, “Verne knew what his contemporaries did not. . . . For his tales to continue taking hardy adventurers into strange locales, he would have to redefine the very idea of wilderness, the whole notion of a frontier.” Why does the notion of the frontier continue to fascinate us? In this Internet age of globalization and routine space travel, what frontiers are left to science fiction? If not physical, might these remaining frontiers be mental and moral?

Customer Reviews

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A journey to the centre of the earth 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It got a littlie boring at the beginning but after a few pages u get sucked in! ?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Did this become a movie?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful book filled with adventure. And a nice version too with no typos that I could see. The other negative comments must be for a different version, not this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first sat down with this book at the beginning of last summer simply because I had nothing to read and I quickly discovered this book was not meant for people with a small vocabulary. After finally finishing the book, I still do not think I know what all the words mean and frequently I had to stop and sound out the words, something I have not done in a long time. At some places it is also a very slow read, partly because of the difficult vocabulary, but also because it is extremly descriptive sometimes taking up one whole page (and the text is not very big) to describe the scene. Some of the paragraphs describe one subject so thoroughly that I constantly got the "I get the message, let's move on" feeling. At these places I got very bored with the book, especially in the first 35 pages. Once you start getting into it, though, the story becomes fantastic and engaging. I am a very big fan of adventure, and the book definatly satisfied my appetite. Because the book is super descriptive, what it is describing is amazing. I could really imagine the height of the cavern, the vast enormity of the sea and the power of the sea monsters. I could always feel the excitement or the rage that Professor Liedenbrock displayed upon his discoveries. And I always felt like I was being but into the shoes of Axel. Jules Verne did a very good job explaining his thoughts. Towards the end of the book, however, the book began to be not as engaging. I began to feel as though the author was rushing the ending which, by the way, was extremley short. It could have been because of their situation, but the book suddenly stopped describing the happenings of the journey. And at the very end I could tell that things were being cut short. Before the ending, Axel was narrating the things that happened in the story. In the ending, it seemed like he was summarizing the narration. But overall the book is really pretty good. It just has a really slow, boring beginning and a rushed, bad ending. The plotline is a very good one, and the order of things and how they were done in the story made sense to me. Whenever Axel and Professor Liedenbrock had a scientific conversation, they explained their hypotheses clearly and it had me wondering if a journey to the center of the Earth could really happen. The three main characters (Axel, Professor Liedenbrock, and Hans, their guide) in the story were so different in thier personalities that it was almost funny when they talked to each other, expressed their opinions and argued. So if you are one who has a diverse vocabulary and a love of lengthy descriptions, this is the book for you. But if you need constant action in a book, or you are just picking it up to pass the time, I would not recomend it.
john257hopper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a re-read. It is a very good adventure, one of his best, maintaining a real sense of threat and suffocating claustrophobia under the ground. There are some internal inconsistencies in dates and timings which would probably not get past a modern editor. Good stuff.
TRHummer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Good bedtime reading for the 7 year old daughter and me. And it takes me waaaaay back: I loved Verne when I was 8 and 9 and 10. The plot of this book is preposterous, but so what?
ScottSlaughter on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Though exciting in spots it is essentially a primer on 19th century theistic evolution.
hazzabamboo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable, if a little too longVerne was famous as a populariser of science, and it's easy to see why. The intellectual content is well-judged, softened by entertainment ¿ it¿s the journey narrative that can be a little plodding, as can his exposition, with too much spare description and repetition. Verne is good at dialogue and characters though, with a timely injection of humour now and then.
mccin68 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
1863 German professor Otto Lidenbrock uncovers ancient icelandic writings that suggest a passage to the center of the earth. professor takes his nephew and danish guide Hans on a trip to a world only one other person has seen. The story is inventive but boring in sections weighted down with science. I would have loved to seen more of the world he encounter as it ended a bit abruptly. I read it because it is a classic and i'm sure utterly suspenseful for it's time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT IS BEASTLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is not a 'fast read!' It is very descriptive. Perhaps too descriptive. This book is not for teenagers and is a book I will never read again!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This novel or book was borin.I really didnt enjoy it.I need the sparknotes for this book and i cant find it because its so uncommon.