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A Little Brother to the Bear
     

A Little Brother to the Bear

by William Joseph Long
 

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This book tells the story of Mooweesuk, the raccoon who was called the bear's little brother by both Indians and naturalists because of the many ways in which he resembles the "big prowler in the black coat." Learn about the coon's secret habits, and read stories about the woodcock, wildcat, toad, and many other animals. Two chapters remarkable for their insight into

Overview

This book tells the story of Mooweesuk, the raccoon who was called the bear's little brother by both Indians and naturalists because of the many ways in which he resembles the "big prowler in the black coat." Learn about the coon's secret habits, and read stories about the woodcock, wildcat, toad, and many other animals. Two chapters remarkable for their insight into the hidden life of animals close this volume, one on Animal Surgery, describing some of the ways in which wild animals treat their wounds; the other on Hunting without a Gun, showing the joy of following even the large and dangerous animals with the desire only to be near and understand them.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781482038767
Publisher:
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication date:
07/08/2013
Pages:
162
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.35(d)

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Meet the Author

William J. Long (1857-1952) was an American writer, naturalist and minister who lived and worked in Stamford, Connecticut. As a naturalist, Long left Stamford every March, often with his two daughters Lois and Cesca, to travel to "the wilderness" of Maine. There they would stay until the first snows of October, although sometimes he would stay all winter. In the 1920s, he began spending his summers in Nova Scotia, claiming "the wilderness is getting too crowded". Long wrote of his wilderness experiences in the books Ways of Wood Folk, Wilderness Ways, Wood-folk Comedies, Northern Trails, Wood Folk at School, and many others. Long believed that the best way to experience the wild was to plant yourself and sit for hours on end to let the wild "come to you; and they will!".

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