A Minimalist Approach to Intrasentential Code Switching

A Minimalist Approach to Intrasentential Code Switching

by Jeff MacSwan

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Overview

A Minimalist Approach to Intrasentential Code Switching by Jeff MacSwan

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781135680053
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 02/04/2014
Series: Outstanding Dissertations in Linguistics
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 306
File size: 2 MB

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxvii
Prefacexxiii
1Rationale3
1.1Schooling, Propaganda, and Social Class5
1.2Prescriptivism and the Status of Languages7
1.3Code Switching and the Ideology of "Cognitive Deficits"10
1.3.1"Semilingualism" and Linguistic Competence10
1.3.2The Threshold Hypothesis and Language Proficiency15
1.4The Ann Arbor Decision, Code Switching, and Language Education19
1.5Bilingualism and Placement in Special Education20
1.6Conclusions21
2Literature Review29
2.1What is Bilingual Proficiency?29
2.1.1Some Definitions30
2.1.2Critical Period Effects and Language Proficiency31
2.1.3Identifying Proficient Bilinguals36
2.2Code Switching37
2.2.1Social Aspects of Code Switching37
2.2.2Grammatical Aspects of Code Switching40
2.2.2.1Poplack's (1980, 1981) approach40
2.2.2.2Joshi's (1985) approach42
2.2.2.3Di Sciullo, Muysken and Singh's (1986) approach43
2.2.2.4Mahootian's (1993) approach44
2.2.2.5Belazi, Rubin and Tor ibio's (1994) approach48
2.2.2.6Speech-planning approaches50
2.2.2.7Summary of basic findings in code switching corpora52
2.3Language Contact Phenomena55
2.3.1Borrowings and Calques55
2.3.2Creoles and Pidgins59
2.4The Theory of Syntax62
2.4.1Some Advantages of Formalism in the Study of Grammar62
2.4.2Generative Grammar Before the Minimalist Program64
2.4.3The Minimalist Program66
2.5Nahuatl and Spanish70
2.5.1Genetic and Typological Relationships70
2.5.2The Spanish Language73
2.5.3The Nahuatl Language73
2.5.3.1Varieties of Nahuatl77
2.5.3.2Nahuatl Courses and Linguistic Studies80
2.5.3.3Nahuatl Orthography81
2.6Spanish and Nahuatl in Central Mexico82
2.6.1The Aztecs and Hernan Cortes82
2.6.2Spanish and Nahuatl in Contemporary Mexico86
3Research Design97
3.1Research Questions97
3.2Consultants98
3.2.1Selection Criteria for Target Language Population98
3.2.2Description of Consultants98
3.3Data Collection Procedures101
3.3.1Naturalistic Observations101
3.3.2Sentence Judgment Tasks103
3.3.3Conventions and Abbreviations Used for Presentation of Data104
3.4How the Research Questions Will be Addressed106
4Spanish-Nahuatl Code Switching: Basic Findings109
4.1Data Obtained Through Elicited Judgments109
4.1.1Conjunctions and because110
4.1.2That-Complement111
4.1.3Other Embedded Clauses113
4.1.4Negation118
4.1.5Quantifiers and Nonreferential Quantified NPs120
4.1.6Demonstratives124
4.1.7Determiners125
4.1.8Nahuatl in and Spanish Nouns126
4.1.9Modification Structures127
4.1.10Switches Involving Subject and Object Pronouns128
4.1.11Switches Involving Clitics131
4.1.12Switches Involving a Bound Morpheme132
4.1.13Other Findings134
4.2Data Obtained in the Naturalistic Observation135
4.2.1Intersentential Switches135
4.2.2Conjunctions135
4.2.3Modification Structures136
4.2.4Nouns137
4.2.5Verbs139
4.2.6Prepositions139
4.2.7C-Elements140
4.2.8D-Elements141
4.2.9Negation141
4.2.10Word-Internal Instances of Code Switching141
4.2.11Adverbs142
4.2.12Interjections142
4.2.13Inventory of Spanish Borrowings in the Naturalistic Data143
5A Minimalist Approach to Code Switching145
5.1Code Switching on Minimalist Assumptions145
5.2The Spanish-Nahuatl Corpus151
5.2.1The Spanish-Nahuatl Corpus on Other Theories151
5.2.2An Analysis of the Data156
5.2.2.1Pronouns and Agreement Morphemes156
5.2.2.2Clitics and Agreement Morphemes171
5.2.2.3Embedded Clauses179
5.2.2.4Duratives190
5.2.2.5Negatives196
5.2.2.6Gender Features in DPs and Modification Structures199
5.2.3Preliminary Conclusions206
5.3Other Corpora and Some Prospects for Further Research207
5.3.1.1Conjunctions and that (Table 1, (1)-(2))208
5.3.1.2Embedded Verbs (Table 1, (3a)-(3d))211
5.3.1.3Negation (Table 1, (3e))215
5.3.1.4D-Matter (Table 1, (4))216
5.3.1.5Modification Structures (Table 1, (5))217
5.3.1.6Pronouns and Clitics (Table 1, (6))219
5.3.1.7Morphological Switches (Table 1, (7))221
5.3.1.8Code Switching and Basic Word Orders225
5.4Some General Conclusions230
6Some Implications for Educational Research and Practice247
6.1Policy: Tacit Tracking and Code Switching248
6.2Curriculum252
6.2.1Revising the Threshold Hypothesis252
6.2.2Language Arts and Linguistic Inquiry255
6.3Teaching: Bilingual Instruction and Code Switching257
6.4Bilingualism and Assessment261
6.5Bilingualism, Cognition and Mental Architecture265
Bibliography271
Index297

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