A Sicilian Romance: A Gothic Novel (Reader's Edition)

A Sicilian Romance: A Gothic Novel (Reader's Edition)

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Overview

Strange moans and mysterious lights haunt the south wing of the Mazzini castle where Julia, the beautiful younger daughter of the Marquis de Mazzini, lives. The terrors of the unknown fade to insignificance when Julia's father orders her to marry the cruel Duke de Luovo. Julia flees the castle and is propelled into a series of adventures that eventually lead her back to the castle, where she discovers an unspeakable crime.

This edition has been copyedited in accordance with current American practice in respect to punctuation. In some places words and phrases have been reordered - and in a very few cases altered or deleted - to improve ease of comprehension. The interspersed poems have been removed. 278 pages; 67,000 words. Includes map.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780979729065
Publisher: Idle Spider Books
Publication date: 01/15/2014
Pages: 278
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.63(d)

About the Author

Ann Ward was born in London in 1764 and married William Radcliffe in 1787. She wrote to occupy herself (she remained childless) and published her first novel in 1789. A Sicilian Romance, published in 1790, was her second novel.

Ann Radcliffe was a reclusive woman who left behind few personal writings that might reveal her thoughts and beliefs. To know her, one must read her novels, and there in the musings and favorite activities of her heroines one might discover the inner life of Ann Radcliffe the woman.

Her work influenced the great English Romantic poets — Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron — as well as novelists such as Thackeray and Scott. Lesser novelists of the time copied her work outrageously in order to profit from her popularity.

Ann Radcliffe refined the Gothic into the form we know today: a heroine trapped by the prototype Byronesque villain in a Gothic setting filled with supernatural elements

She died of pneumonia in 1823.

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