Abide with Me (Lib)(CD)

Abide with Me (Lib)(CD)

by Elizabeth Strout
3.6 38

Audiobook(CD)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781415927083
Publisher: Books on Tape, Inc.
Publication date: 03/28/2006
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.50(h) x 5.00(d)

About the Author

With her bestselling debut novel Amy and Isabelle shortlisted for the 2000 Orange Prize, Elizabeth Strout was well on her way to making a name for herself. The book was subsequently turned into a made-for-TV movie. Her third book, Olive Kitteridge, a collection of linked stories, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009. Her newest novel My Name Is Lucy Barton made the Longlist for the 2016 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. Strout practiced law for six years before becoming a full-time writer.

Hometown:

Brooklyn, New York

Date of Birth:

January 6, 1956

Place of Birth:

Portland, Maine

Education:

B.A., Bates College, 1977; J.D., Syracuse College of Law, 1982

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Abide with Me 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had tears streaming down my cheeks by the end. I didn't find it slow-paced at all. I thought her characterizations were wonderful. I had wonderful visual images of everyone. It's ultimately very uplifting in its message of love and acceptance. My favorite line in the book is when Tyler responds to Connie's remark about coming from a family of sinners: 'Oh, Connie - we all do.' It has some similarities to Amy and Isabelle. I love how she shows that everyone is imperfect, everyone is a sinner, yet we're all capable and deserving of both kindness and forgiveness.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Elizabeth Strout is an author that has written only three books and I can't wait until she writes her fourth. "Abide with Me" is full of characters that exhibit human qualities that are both good and bad. I loved every page and was sad to see it end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just love the way Elizabeth Strout writes. The way she constructs sentences, the way she describes things, it's all just beautiful. I loved Amy & Isabelle and was the slightest bit hesitant to read Abide with Me b/c I am Jewish and feared I wouldn't be able to relate to it, but I'm so glad I did decide to read it. I didn't want it to end I wanted to read on and on about these people and what happened to their lives.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I began to read this book reluctantly, fearing it would be too 'religious' and the characters not at all realistic. I was so wrong! Almost immediately I was drawn into the book by Strout's compellingly graceful style. Then I became enthralled with each of the characters, who were so fully developed and engaging. Tyler struggled with human flaws as a 'man of the cloth' and Lauren was decidedly not a stereotypical minister's wife. They and all the other characters seemed totally human and real. This book is among the very best I've ever read, and I now look forward to reading her first novel, Amy and Isabelle.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! It was loaned to me and i thought i would not like it , that i would read a few pages then put it down and return it
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theshippingnews More than 1 year ago
I liked this book, though I found myself feeling frustrated with Tyler throughout the entire thing. I kept thinking that I should have been feeling more sympathetic towards him than I actually did. I suppose it was difficult to accept how disconnected he seemed from his daughter, especially since she needed him so much. I think the most distracting thing, though, was the way his wife's character seemed to change as the novel progressed, and not in a good way. She first came across as strong-willed and interesting. Later, she seemed to be nothing more than a shallow spendthrift and petty thief. It was odd. Still worth reading, though.