Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A History of Courage, Intrigue and Unlikely Friendships

Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A History of Courage, Intrigue and Unlikely Friendships

by Michael Hogan

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780985774493
Publisher: EgretBooks.com
Publication date: 08/20/2016
Pages: 362
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.81(d)

About the Author

Michael Hogan is the author of twenty-four books, including the best-selling The Irish Soldiers of Mexico and the controversial Savage Capitalism and the Myth of Democracy. He is Emeritus Humanities Chair at the American School Foundation of Guadalajara, and a former professor of International Relations at the Autonomous University of Guadalajara. He is a member of the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, and the Sociedad de Geografía y Estadísticas de Jalisco

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface Chapter One: Mexico Before the Conflict Chapter Two: Texas Statehood and General Taylor's Army Chapter Three: The Thornton Affair and Mr. Polk's War Chapter Four: The Loyal Opposition Argues Against War with Mexico Chapter Five: Abraham Lincoln and the Spot Resolutions Chapter Six: Lincoln Writes to Herndon Chapter Seven: Consummate Politician or Courageous Statesman? Chapter Eight: Pilloried in the Press for Pro-Mexican Views Chapter Nine: The Mexican Republic Much Reduced Chapter Ten: The United States Inherits the Whirlwind Chapter Eleven: Lincoln and the Beginnings of Civil War Chapter Twelve: Friends of Mexico, Friends of Lincoln Chapter Thirteen: The French Empire in Mexico Chapter Fourteen: Four for Freedom: Grant and Sherman, Romero and Juárez. Chapter Fifteen: US Colored Troops and American Legion of Honor Chapter Sixteen: Imperialist Forces Falter Chapter Seventeen: The March to Mexico City Chapter Eighteen: Lincoln's Legacy, Mexico's Pride Appendix: A Selection of Original Documents in Their Complete, Unedited Format Bibliography List of Photos and Maps Author Biography Other Books by the Author Acknowledgements Epilogue Index

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Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A History of Courage, Intrigue and Unlikely Friendships 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Abraham Lincoln is an iconic figure, a president that has been quoted innumerable times, and a hero people from all over the world have looked up to for decades. Despite his popularity and the hundreds of books and biographies published on Lincoln, what remained uncovered was substantial; all until Dr. Michael Hogan, a renowned historian and Emeritus Professor, revealed much of what there is to know in his most recent book: Abraham Lincoln and Mexico. Across 18 chapters, Dr. Hogan recounts what by any measure is an extraordinary life. Over several decades, Abraham Lincoln expressed his opinion regardless of any consequence, fought to maintain a troubled nation united, and even helped Mexicans recover their country from the French. Expressing a nuanced view of Lincoln, in which Dr. Hogan pays as much attention to Lincoln’s errors as to his achievements, and a disputing view of the Mexican-American issues at the time, Dr. Hogan leaves us in no doubt that Lincoln was a giant of man. Typically, historical biographies are a mode of writing that focus on ‘great’ men and (less often) ‘great’ women. However, the idea of the ‘great man theory’ is something Hogan modifies because he came to realize that without Mary Todd Lincoln’s intercession and Matias Romero’s advice, the aid to Mexico during the French Occupation would never have occurred. Dr. Hogan’s balanced study of Lincoln shows how more subtle biographies can actually contribute to much of our previous understanding of the past. Without Romero, Mary Todd and Lincoln himself, it is impossible to factually say how things would’ve turned out, but it is a fact that Lincoln’s beliefs and the actions of these secondary characters helped shape American history. In building this narrative, Dr. Hogan also gives vivid accounts of the many men and women who interacted with, and influenced, Lincoln. These include some already well-known characters such as Henry David Thoreau, James Russell Lowell, and Stephen Douglas. However, as I previously mentioned, the book also explores the lives of many less well-known, but equally important figures, such as Matias Romero and Mary Todd Lincoln, referred to as Mrs. Lincoln in the book. Dr. Hogan’s careful attention to the American political context leads to a much more nuanced view of Abraham Lincoln than was the case with some older books. Indeed, he goes beyond the boundaries of a purely biographical approach: his discussion of the Mexican-American War, which was fought between 1846 and 1848, covers some 40 pages, while Lincoln himself, is absent. Instead, we get descriptions of the fighting, quotes from other officers, writers, activists, and Congressmen, and an erudite commentary on the situation as a whole. Dr. Hogan began this book because of a student's comment that the famous Spielberg movie on Lincoln did not even mention Mexico. Annoyed and exasperated by this omission he decided to explore this gap. Luckily for us, Hogan came up with an all-embracing and well-researched “biography” that comprehensively narrates the turbulent period beginning with the Mexican-American war in 1846 and ending with the fall of the French Empire in Mexico in 1867. An account that conveys the true value of history, allowing every one of us, whether we agree or disagree with the views presented, to understand how we got to where we are and where we might be tomorrow.
miguel2 More than 1 year ago
Why don’t USA schools teach this? Years ago in 11th grade US History class, I learned that the US declared war on Mexico in 1846 to retaliate for Mexico attacking the USA. WRONG!! This award-winning new history by a Ph.D. historian and educator sets the record straight and reveals the truth about why President Polk and allies wanted to expand the United States from “sea to shining sea,” and how Polk lied to Congress to obtain a declaration of war to further his expansionist agenda. Using archival documents, the book examines the US military invasion of Mexico, the rape and pillage as US troops marched to Mexico City and captured the government, forcing Mexico to give up Mexican sovereign territory from Texas to California. It also examines Abraham Lincoln’s opposition to the war as Congressman, and his later actions as President to help Mexico defeat French occupation forces of Napoleon. It’s a great book for history buffs and Lincoln followers, and should be required reading in US History classes.
jsbeauchamp More than 1 year ago
Since its publication in 1997, Hogan's Irish Soldiers of Mexico has inspired growing interest in a previously little known area of Mexican-American history—the Irish battalion known as San Patricios composed of soldiers who deserted the American Army during the Mexican-American War and fought for the Mexican Army. In his newest book, he explores in depth Abraham Lincoln's complex relationship with the issues surrounding the Mexican-American War and its aftermath. His analysis of Lincoln's vocal opposition to the war as a Congressional Representative from Illinois shows Lincoln to be a man of principle and moral depth who took a stand based on clear evidence and firm beliefs, even though he paid a high political price for doing so. Hogan shows that throughout his career Lincoln stuck by his position on Mexico and maintained important relationships with Mexican officials such as the Mexican diplomat, Matias Romero, that ultimately led to military and financial support for President Benito Juarez and his Republican Army as they fought against and defeated the imperial government of Maximilian and became an independent republic again. In addition to detailed and fully documented accounts of important episodes in the Mexican-American War and the war to defeat Maximilian, Hogan shows how Lincoln's views on the rights of sovereign nations and of citizens of democratic republics are consistent with the ideals expressed in the U.S. Constitution. He also stands firmly against self-serving abuses of power and violations of international agreements and law. Hogan shows that Lincoln applied these principles equally in his leadership of the U.S. during the Civil War and his foreign policy. Hogan seeks to correct a number of common views of Lincoln that he thinks are not based on a full assessment of the documents available, many of which he reprints in the lengthy appendix to his book. These documents, along with the extensive bibliography, provide a firm basis for a reevaluation of Lincoln in this area and help to explain why he remains one of the most revered American presidents in Mexico. Like his previous book on the San Patricios, Abraham Lincoln and Mexico shines bright light on an important area of history that has remained in the shadows for a century and a half. It is an important contribution to understanding Mexican-American history and a step forward in the journey toward truth.
SofiaGates More than 1 year ago
The book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A History of Courage, Intrigue and Unlikely Friendships by Dr. Michael Hogan tells the true and intriguing story of the Mexican - American War (1846-1848) which to this day remains untaught and almost unmentioned in the American high school curriculum. As a student who has studied in both the United States and Mexico, this book was particularly interesting due to its truthful portrayal of the United States, a country which, in this case, was not the hero. Dr. Hogan uses a variety of vital sources which brilliantly contribute to the powerfulness of the history which is being told. A wonderful thing about this book is that it is not limited to a purely history-loving audience, as it contains an almost narrative tone which makes the story even more gripping and hard to put down. Overall, it is a highly recommended read for anyone interested in the true story of the Mexican-American War or the incredible brilliance of President Lincoln.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent book for us history buffs! Especially with our current political climate, Lincoln and Mexico is a must read. Highly recommended for History students and teachers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Abraham Lincoln is an iconic figure, a president that has been quoted innumerable times, and a hero people from all over the world have looked up to for decades. Despite his popularity and the hundreds of books and biographies published on Lincoln, what remained uncovered was substantial; all until Dr. Michael Hogan, a renowned historian and Emeritus Professor, revealed much of what there is to know in his most recent book: Abraham Lincoln and Mexico. Across 18 chapters, Dr. Hogan recounts what by any measure is an extraordinary life. Over several decades, Abraham Lincoln expressed his opinion regardless of any consequence, fought to maintain a troubled nation united, and even helped Mexicans recover their country from the French. Expressing a nuanced view of Lincoln, in which Dr. Hogan pays as much attention to Lincoln’s errors as to his achievements, and a disputing view of the Mexican-American issues at the time, Dr. Hogan leaves us in no doubt that Lincoln was a giant of man. Typically, historical biographies are a mode of writing that focus on ‘great’ men and (less often) ‘great’ women. However, the idea of the ‘great man theory’ is something Hogan modifies because he came to realize that without Mary Todd Lincoln’s intercession and Matias Romero’s advice, the aid to Mexico during the French Occupation would never have occurred. Dr. Hogan’s balanced study of Lincoln shows how more subtle biographies can actually contribute to much of our previous understanding of the past. Without Romero, Mary Todd and Lincoln himself, it is impossible to factually say how things would’ve turned out, but it is a fact that Lincoln’s beliefs and the actions of these secondary characters helped shape American history. In building this narrative, Dr. Hogan also gives vivid accounts of the many men and women who interacted with, and influenced, Lincoln. These include some already well-known characters such as Henry David Thoreau, James Russell Lowell, and Stephen Douglas. However, as I previously mentioned, the book also explores the lives of many less well-known, but equally important figures, such as Matias Romero and Mary Todd Lincoln, referred to as Mrs. Lincoln in the book. Dr. Hogan’s careful attention to the American political context leads to a much more nuanced view of Abraham Lincoln than was the case with some older books. Indeed, he goes beyond the boundaries of a purely biographical approach: his discussion of the Mexican-American War, which was fought between 1846 and 1848, covers some 40 pages, while Lincoln himself, is absent. Instead, we get descriptions of the fighting, quotes from other officers, writers, activists, and Congressmen, and an erudite commentary on the situation as a whole. Dr. Hogan began this book because of a student's comment that the famous Spielberg movie on Lincoln did not even mention Mexico. Annoyed and exasperated by this omission he decided to explore this gap. Luckily for us, Hogan came up with an all-embracing and well-researched “biography” that comprehensively narrates the turbulent period beginning with the Mexican-American war in 1846 and ending with the fall of the French Empire in Mexico in 1867. An account that conveys the true value of history, allowing every one of us, whether we agree or disagree with the views presented, to understand how we got to where we are and where we might be tomorrow.