The Absorbent Mind

The Absorbent Mind

by Maria Montessori

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781604595406
Publisher: Wilder Publications
Publication date: 11/20/2008
Pages: 244
Sales rank: 557,081
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Maria Montessori, born in Italy in 1870, dedicated her life to learning how best to educate children—particularly the poorest, most challenged children—during their vulnerable beginnings. Today her legacy is evident worldwide. She died in the Netherlands in 1952.

John Chattin-McNichols, Ph.D., is the President of the American Montessori Society and Professor of Education at Seattle University. He is the author and editor of several books on Montessori education.

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The Absorbent Mind 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
dchaikin on LibraryThing 20 days ago
A tough read, especially a 120 page stretch in the middle (chapers 5-15). But, it has a special kind of complex elegance. Montessori puts forward her theories of education and the whole state of the human race. It¿s a real, full, coherent education theory that actually feels workable. This I think is unique in education (I¿m no expert). And it is all expressed with such intelligence. I kept finding comments that just needed to be highlighted, and I copied out six pages of quotes.This is not a book to pick up lightly, and it¿s not the one you want to go to if you are thinking of putting your children in a Montessori school and are looking for introduction into the method. This book is work. Also, the book extends far beyond the Montessori teaching method, and only some of the details of that system are included here. Maria Montessori gave the lectures that eventually became this book while in India during WWII. She had gone to Holland after being exiled from Italy by Mussolini in the 1930¿s. When the Germans overran Holland, she was placed in India. She was in her 70¿s and had successfully been teaching her method for 40 years. This was book was a life's work in summary. I think these quotes cover part of her theory as expressed here:We, by contrast, are recipients. Impressions pour into us, and we store them in our minds; but we ourselves remain apart from them, just as a vase keeps separate from the water it contains. Instead, the child undergoes a transformation. Impressions do not merely enter his mind; they form it. They incarnate themselves into him. The child creates his own ¿mental muscles,¿ using for this what he finds in the world about him. We have named this type of mentality, The Absorbent Mind. p. 24 The hand is in direct connection with man¿s soul, and not only with the individual¿s soul, but also with the different ways of life the men have adopted on the earth in different places and at different times. p. 138 We often forget that imagination is a force for the discovery of the truth. p161 The pity of it is that after six, children can no longer develop character and its qualities spontaneously. Thenceforward the missionaries, who are also imperfect, find themselves faced with considerable difficulties. They are working on the smoke, and not on the fire p190 If we examine the programmes of work recommended for use in schools, we see at once their poverty and dullness. The education of today is humiliating. It produces an inferiority complex and artificially lowers the powers of man. Its very organization sets a limit to knowledge well below the natural level. p195
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a worthless scan of the original book. Opening page says: 'this book was drenched" (???) All through the book the page header ('The absorbent mind') is repeated in the middle of the pages. I guess you get what you paid for :( Actually I got even less. They gave me sh*t, spend my time and got my cc and personal info.