Across a Hundred Mountains

Across a Hundred Mountains

by Reyna Grande
4.1 11

Hardcover

$21.27 $23.00 Save 8% Current price is $21.27, Original price is $23. You Save 8%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande

Winner of the American Book Award, Across a Hundred Mountains is a stunning and poignant novel about a young girl who leaves her small town in Mexico to find her father, who left his family to find work in America—a story of migration, loss, and discovery.

After a tragedy separates her from her mother, Juana García leaves in search of her father, who left them two years earlier. Out of money and in need of someone to help her across the border, Juana meets Adelina Vasquez, a young woman who left her family in California to follow her lover to Mexico. Finding themselves—in a Tijuana jail—in desperate circumstances, they offer each other much needed material and spiritual support and ultimately become linked forever in the most unexpected of ways.

In Across a Hundred Mountains, Reyna Grande puts a human face on the controversial issue of immigration, helping readers to better understand those who risk life and limb every day in pursuit of a better life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743269575
Publisher: Atria Books
Publication date: 06/20/2006
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Reyna Grande is an award-winning author, motivational speaker, and writing teacher. As a girl, she crossed the U.S.–Mexico border to join her family in Los Angeles, a harrowing journey she chronicled in The Distance Between Us, which was a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist. She is also the author of the novels Dancing with Butterflies and Across a Hundred Mountains. She lives in Woodland, CA with her husband and two children.

Read an Excerpt

Across a Hundred Mountains

A Novel
By Reyna Grande

Atria

Copyright © 2006 Reyna Grande
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0743269578

From Across a Hundred Mountains

adelina

"That's your father's grave," the old man repeated, in a voice that was barely audible. He'd been silent most of the crossing. When he had to speak at all, he did so softly, as if this place was as holy as church.

The U.S. border.

Adelina looked at the large pile of rocks he was pointing to. The old man had to be mistaken. Her father wasn't under there. He couldn't be.

She wiped the sweat from her forehead with the back of her hand. Then she used her hand as a shield to cover her eyes from the glare of the sun. She took a few steps forward until she was in the shadow of a boulder towering above them and the pile of rocks.

Could her father really be buried there?

She gulped. Her mouth was dry, and swallowing made her throat ache, as if she were swallowing a prickly pear, spines and all. She felt tears burning her eyes and quickly rubbed them dry.

"It's not too late to turn around and go back," the old man said. "Maybe it would be best."

Adelina took adeep breath, then turned to look at the sea of shrub and cactus stretching out around her. The terrain seemed to never end. It had taken almost all day to get here. They hadn't been caught by the immigration patrol this time.

She looked back at the old man. He must have been a good coyote back in the day when he was young and agile. Even now, with sixty years on his back, a bad eye, and a lame knee, he'd managed to get her past the ever-watching eyes of la migra on their second attempt.

"We can turn around now," the old man said again. "You've seen his grave, let that be enough."

Adelina shook her head and began to walk down to the pile. "I didn't come to see a grave," she said as she took off her backpack. "I came to find my father, and I will take him with me, even if I have to carry his bones on my back."

The old man looked at her with surprise. Adelina didn't look at his good brown eye. Instead, she looked at his left eye, the one with the blue film over it. She had discovered that this was the only way she could make the old man look away. The old man looked back at the rocks and said nothing.

Yet Adelina knew what he was thinking. She had lied to him. She had not told him she was planning to dig up the body and, if it really was her father, take him back with her. He would not have brought her here had she told him this.

She bent down and began to remove the rocks one by one. So many rocks on top of him. So much weight to support. Maybe once the rocks were gone, maybe once he was free, she, too, would be free.

"It may not even be him," the old man said as he grabbed her wrist to stop her from removing any more rocks.

"I have to know," Adelina said. "For nineteen years I have not known what happened to my father. You have no idea what it's like to live like that -- not to know. Hoy sabre la verdad." She yanked her arm and continued removing the rocks. The old man walked away from her.

She tried to hurry. One by one the rocks were lifted. Some rocks rolled down and hit her knees. Her fingers began to hurt from being scraped. There was still a possibility the old man was right. Maybe it wasn't her father. But which would be worse, that it was her father or that it wasn't?

Nineteen years not knowing. Too many years thinking he had abandoned them.

"Look!" the old man said.

Adelina turned around and saw a cloud of dust rising in the distance.

"La migra," the old man said. "We must hide."

Adelina turned back to the rocks and in desperation began throwing them against the boulder. The sound echoed against the settled dust. She had to know who was buried there. She had to see for herself if it really was her father.

"What are you doing? Hide!" The old man quickly made his way to a crevice in the boulder. But Adelina kept throwing off the rocks and didn't move from where she was.

"Let them come," she said. "Let la migra find us. Maybe they can help us take this man's bones back -- " She gasped at the sight of a small metal cross. She quickly lifted more rocks and then covered her mouth with her hand to stifle a cry. She looked at the old man, at his bad eye, but this time the old man didn't look away.

"It's a white rosary with heart-shaped beads, yes?" he asked.

Adelina nodded, looking down at the rusted metal cross, at the white beads, at the bones that had once been a hand.

The old man hadn't lied.

"He was clutching the rosary so tightly when I found him dead, right there where he is now," the old man said. "It's as if he had been praying right until his death. Praying for a miracle, perhaps."

"That son-of-a-bitch coyote just left him here to die!" Adelina said.

"Your father was bitten by a snake. The coyote probably left him here thinking la migra would find him. Look, here they come now."

Adelina turned around and saw a white vehicle approaching. La migra was here.

But they were nineteen years too late to save her father.

juana

Mexico

Juana looked at her mother standing in the doorway. Ama was trying to see through the watery veil and down the road, hoping Apa would appear. She'd been there for over an hour as the rain filled the puddles outside. Juana rocked the hammock back and forth inside the shack, humming a song to her baby sister, Anita, who would not fall asleep. It was as if Anita was also waiting for Apa to come home.

Darkness fell and the rain continued. Juana lay in her cot, wondering where Apa was. He was a campesino, and he worked in the fields planting and harvesting crops on the other side of the river. She knew that once in a while he would be delayed if someone got hurt with a machete, or bitten by a snake. Could something have happened to her father? If so, why wasn't anyone coming to tell them?

Ama sighed as she wrapped her rebozo tight around her. Her dress was wet, her legs were speckled with mud, but still she stood, exposed to the elements, refusing to warm herself inside the shack and eat a bowl of beans.

"Tu padre no llega," she said to Juana as she gave one more glance up the road, before she finally came inside. She headed straight to the altar in the corner where many statues of saints were glowing from the light of the candles. She took her rosary out from her brassiere and gently caressed the shiny, black beads.

"Maybe he can't cross the river," Juana said, joining her mother at the altar. She knew that sometimes when it rained hard, the river swelled, making it impossible for anyone to cross. Sometimes it swelled so much the water would overflow, creeping into the shacks like un ladron, a thief.

Ama nodded, then knelt on the dirt floor and made the sign of the cross. Juana watched the flame of the candle flickering on La Virgen de Guadalupe's brown face and dedicated all her prayers to her. Then she picked up her rosary and kissed the metal cross hanging from it. Apa gave her this rosary the day of her first communion, a year and a half ago, on her tenth birthday.

"Ave Maria Purisima," Ama said.

"Sin pecado concevida," Juana added. Their voices filled the shack and lulled Anita to sleep. As they prayed, Juana was glad their voices drowned out the unforgiving rain beating on their tar-soaked cardboard roof.

The rain didn't want to be silenced by their prayers. Thunder shook the walls, making the bamboo sticks rattle like wet bones. Juana said her prayers louder, just in case La Virgencita couldn't properly hear her. After a while her throat ached, and still, Apa did not come.

Her prayers became softer and softer, until they were merely whispers, until she only echoed every other word her mother said. Then, finally, it was only her mother praying.

Juana's eyes wanted to close. She'd been kneeling for so long she could no longer feel her bony knees. But she couldn't leave Ama alone to wait for her father. The image of La Virgen blurred in front of her. Her body swayed to one side. Her rosary fell to the dirt floor.

"Go to bed, Juana," her mother said in a raspy voice. "You've done your part, my daughter."

Juana shook her head and opened her mouth to say another prayer, but she could no longer think of any.

"Go to sleep. I'll wake you when Apa comes home." Ama made the sign of the cross in front of Juana and tried to help her get up. Juana couldn't stand up, so instead, she crawled all the way to her cot, being careful not to spill any of the pots Ama had placed around the shack to catch the rainwater leaking through the roof.

Juana was wet all over when she woke up. For a brief moment, she felt embarrassed, thinking she had peed her bed. Her mother stood beside the cot, holding a candle. Even in the dim candlelight Juana could see the shack flooded with water.

"The river has flooded," Ama said. "We must get on the table." She was cradling Anita in one arm. Juana noticed that Ama's wet dress clung to her, as if afraid.

Ama turned around and waded to the small dining table. Juana's body trembled as she lowered her legs into the cold water. The water reached to her waist. She guided herself by the flame of the candle her mother held and made her way to the table, pushing plastic cups, clothes, pieces of cardboard, soggy tortillas, flowers, and candlesticks out of the way. She glanced in the direction where the altar should have been, but all she saw was water.

Juana got on top of the table and sat next to her mother. Both tucked their feet underneath their legs.

"It's the river that doesn't let Miguel come home," Ama said. Juana nodded. She wondered if Apa knew the shack had flooded. She hoped that soon he would try to cross the river to come for them and take them to town, to her godmother's house. There they would be warm and dry.

Juana leaned against her mother and listened to Anita's sucking sounds as she nursed from Ama's large, round breast.

"Don't worry, mi'ja," Ama said. "Your father will come for us soon. Tomorrow the rain will stop, and the river waters will go back down."

The rain continued, and the river waters did not recede. By now their bodies shivered and their stomachs growled, but they were helpless to do anything about it. Only Anita was warm inside her mother's rebozo. And only her stomach was soothed by her mother's milk. Juana clutched her stomach tight and tried not to think about how hungry or cold she was, or how heavy her eyelids felt. She only thought about Apa. Soon, he would come for them. Soon, they would be at her madrina's house, drinking a cup of hot chocolate, all of them together.

A few hours after daylight, there was still no sign of Apa. Ama waded through the water and yanked the door open. The sky was still heavy with clouds, and the rain was now falling in a drizzle.

"I'll go look for help," Ama said. She walked back to Juana and handed her the baby.

"But Ama -- "

"I must try to make it to Don Agustin's house farther down the river. They have a boat. Maybe they can row us to the other side."

Juana grabbed her sister and held her tight. The baby let out a cry and opened her arms to her mother.

Ama shook her head. "Stay with your sister, Anita. Mami will come back soon."

Juana lowered her head as Ama made the sign of the cross and blessed her.

Ama took off her shawl and placed it over Anita. "I won't be long. Take good care of your sister, Juana. Hold her tight and don't let go of her."

"I won't, Ama," Juana said as she tightened her hold on Anita. She leaned against the wall and sat very still on top of the table. Ama looked at them one more time and then struggled back to the door, splashing the muddy water as she left.

Juana watched the ripples her mother had made get smaller and smaller. Soon, the water settled down again. It was so still, as if Ama had never walked through it.

". . . Dios te salve Maria, llena eres de gracia, bendita eres entre todas las mujeres y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesus. Amen." Juana wet her lips with her tongue. Her throat was dry, but she kept praying because every time she paused she could hear the rain pouring down again. Why couldn't it stop raining?

Anita stirred awake once more and began to make funny sucking noises. She pressed closer to Juana, searching for her mother's breasts.

"There, there, Anita, go back to sleep." Juana rocked the baby up and down. Anita wailed and waved her fists in the air. "Go to sleep, Anita, go to sleep."

The baby's cries cut straight through Juana's ears, leaving them ringing. Juana began to pray once more, hoping the sound of her voice would make her sister go to sleep. But Anita cried and cried. Juana put her finger inside Anita's mouth. Anita latched on to it quickly and immediately began sucking on it. Juana smiled at the tingling she felt on the tip of her finger. But too soon, Anita pushed the finger away and let out another loud scream.

"Please come soon, Apa," Juana said over and over again. Her eyelids began to close. She tried to grab some water to splash on her face, but she couldn't reach it. She held Anita tight as she pushed herself closer to the edge of the table. Her hand slipped from under her and she almost fell.

After what seemed an eternity, Anita finally fell asleep sucking on her tiny fist. The sound of the rain falling on the roof began to penetrate Juana's sleepy mind. It was still raining. Her parents still hadn't come.

Juana's body trembled, her stomach had begun to eat itself, and it seemed her eyelids were tied to rocks. She forced her left eye open with one hand while she held her sister with the other. The right eye closed, demanding sleep. Juana wondered if it was possible to let her right eye sleep, while the left eye kept guard.

"I must not fall asleep," she told herself. "I must not fall asleep, I must not . . ."

Copyright © 2006 by Reyna Grande



Continues...


Excerpted from Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande Copyright © 2006 by Reyna Grande. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

SUMMARY
After years of taking care of her mother, Juana Garcia leaves her small town in Mexico to find her father who disappeared nineteen years earlier. Out of money and in need of someone to help her cross the border, Juana meets Adelina Vasquez, who left her family in California three years prior to follow forbidden love in Mexico.
After the two women join forces in the most unlikely locale — a Tijuana city jail — nothing is ever quite what it seems. In a vivid novel depicting dreams deferred and dreams fulfilled, Grande takes readers inside the lives of Mexicans who are left behind in the phenomenon of migration to the United States.

READING GROUP DISCUSSION
1. Early in the book, we learn that Juana is enslaved to feelings of guilt and obligation: "Her father's ashes. Her redemption. Perhaps after she delivered the ashes to her dying mother there would be no more demons to haunt her, and she would be able to lower her head on a pillow and sleep" (page 12). What event initially inspires Juana's remorse? How does that event shape the character she ultimately becomes? Besides the search for her father, in what other ways does Juana attempt to redeem herself?
2. As the story flips between plotlines, the conclusion of one chapter is often very similar to the introduction of the next, at least in terms of what each character is doing. Find as many examples as you can throughout the book where the transition between Adelina and Juana involves the two characters taking part in the same activity. What effect does this technique have on the story as a whole?
3. The author uses vivid imagery throughout the novel to bring the experiences of Juana and Adelina to the reader. What imagery was the most striking? What other techniques does the author employ to involve the reader in the setting and events?
4. When Adelina sleeps in the park after first arriving in Los Angeles, the man who directs her towards Don Ernesto offers an interesting theory about the moon: "'It has two faces. She only shows one face to the world. Even though it changes shape constantly, it's always the same face we see. But her second face, her second face remains hidden in darkness. That's the face no one can see. People call it the dark side of the moon. Two identities. Two sides of a coin...'" (page 25). Does Adelina identify with the moon? What ultimate revelation does this statement serve to foreshadow?
5. At what point in the novel do you begin to consider the possibility that the two characters, Adelina and Juana, are in fact the same person? What does the author accomplish in constructing the novel in this way? Does the narrative style of each identity differ in any way?
6. Lupe, Juana's mother, believes the saints punish her for succumbing to Don Elias and sleeping with him in order to pay off her debt. Even when she takes part in the Semana Santa ceremony as a flagelante, she receives no salvation and never gets her son back. Lupe's life plummets after this final failed attempt for redemption, but is her faith itself altered?
7. In spite of all the suffering Juana watches her mother go through, she eventually repeats her mother's actions — surrendering perhaps even more than Lupe did — when she becomes a prostitute. Is Juana's desire to find her father worthy of such a sacrifice?
8. Prayers made to saints often go unanswered in the novel. "Juana remembered the times of long ago when the saints and La Virgen de Guadalupe had been there for them. But now, all the statues were covered with dust, and the flower petals had long ago shriveled" (page 130). Does Juana's (Adelina's) faith change throughout the course of the novel? What does she rely upon to keep her hope alive?
9. Don Ernesto becomes somewhat of a father figure to Adelina, yet she breaks her final promise to him when she denies herself the "chance to be happy with" Sebastian (page 158). What motivates her to make this choice? Although the reader never learns if Adelina returns to Sebastian, do you think the author implies in the conclusion that Adelina is in fact ready to follow through on her promise to Don Ernesto?
10. Duality is a predominant theme in this book. Besides Juana, are there any other characters that develop different identities? What characters resemble one another, especially in terms of what they mean to Juana/Adelina?
11. The story opens and closes with "Adelina" chapters. Do you think this was a conscious decision the author made? If so, what is the significance of this choice?
12. The main characters in Across a Hundred Mountains are women, several of whom are victims of male brutality or abandonment. What effect do these characterizations have upon the overall message of the novel?

ENHANCE YOUR BOOKCLUB
1. Set the mood with food! However sparse her meal, what Juana eats is often described in great detail throughout Across a Hundred Mountains. Before your book club meeting, look online for recipes (this site has many Mexican meal suggestions: http://www.mexgrocer.com/) for the authentic Mexican dishes and foods that the characters eat, such as quesadillas. Assign different dishes to members in your book club and bring the food to your meeting.
2. Juana ultimately assumes Adelina's identity. Before your book group meets to discuss Across a Hundred Mountains, have fun playing with this theme. Draw names to swap "identities" with another member in your club, and come dressed up as that member for your meeting. Everyone in the group can take turns guessing who each person has become!
3. Author Reyna Grande has a comprehensive website: http://www.reynagrande.com/ Before your meeting, read about Reyna and discover what her favorite books are. Read selections from a few of those books and discuss whether they served as literary influences.

Introduction

SUMMARY

After years of taking care of her mother, Juana Garcia leaves her small town in Mexico to find her father who disappeared nineteen years earlier. Out of money and in need of someone to help her cross the border, Juana meets Adelina Vasquez, who left her family in California three years prior to follow forbidden love in Mexico.

After the two women join forces in the most unlikely locale — a Tijuana city jail — nothing is ever quite what it seems. In a vivid novel depicting dreams deferred and dreams fulfilled, Grande takes readers inside the lives of Mexicans who are left behind in the phenomenon of migration to the United States.

READING GROUP DISCUSSION

1. Early in the book, we learn that Juana is enslaved to feelings of guilt and obligation: "Her father's ashes. Her redemption. Perhaps after she delivered the ashes to her dying mother there would be no more demons to haunt her, and she would be able to lower her head on a pillow and sleep" (page 12). What event initially inspires Juana's remorse? How does that event shape the character she ultimately becomes? Besides the search for her father, in what other ways does Juana attempt to redeem herself?

2. As the story flips between plotlines, the conclusion of one chapter is often very similar to the introduction of the next, at least in terms of what each character is doing. Find as many examples as you can throughout the book where the transition between Adelina and Juana involves the two characters taking part in the same activity. What effect does this technique have on the story as a whole?

3. The author uses vivid imagery throughout the novel to bring the experiences of Juana and Adelina to thereader. What imagery was the most striking? What other techniques does the author employ to involve the reader in the setting and events?

4. When Adelina sleeps in the park after first arriving in Los Angeles, the man who directs her towards Don Ernesto offers an interesting theory about the moon: "'It has two faces. She only shows one face to the world. Even though it changes shape constantly, it's always the same face we see. But her second face, her second face remains hidden in darkness. That's the face no one can see. People call it the dark side of the moon. Two identities. Two sides of a coin...'" (page 25). Does Adelina identify with the moon? What ultimate revelation does this statement serve to foreshadow?

5. At what point in the novel do you begin to consider the possibility that the two characters, Adelina and Juana, are in fact the same person? What does the author accomplish in constructing the novel in this way? Does the narrative style of each identity differ in any way?

6. Lupe, Juana's mother, believes the saints punish her for succumbing to Don Elias and sleeping with him in order to pay off her debt. Even when she takes part in the Semana Santa ceremony as a flagelante, she receives no salvation and never gets her son back. Lupe's life plummets after this final failed attempt for redemption, but is her faith itself altered?

7. In spite of all the suffering Juana watches her mother go through, she eventually repeats her mother's actions — surrendering perhaps even more than Lupe did — when she becomes a prostitute. Is Juana's desire to find her father worthy of such a sacrifice?

8. Prayers made to saints often go unanswered in the novel. "Juana remembered the times of long ago when the saints and La Virgen de Guadalupe had been there for them. But now, all the statues were covered with dust, and the flower petals had long ago shriveled" (page 130). Does Juana's (Adelina's) faith change throughout the course of the novel? What does she rely upon to keep her hope alive?

9. Don Ernesto becomes somewhat of a father figure to Adelina, yet she breaks her final promise to him when she denies herself the "chance to be happy with" Sebastian (page 158). What motivates her to make this choice? Although the reader never learns if Adelina returns to Sebastian, do you think the author implies in the conclusion that Adelina is in fact ready to follow through on her promise to Don Ernesto?

10. Duality is a predominant theme in this book. Besides Juana, are there any other characters that develop different identities? What characters resemble one another, especially in terms of what they mean to Juana/Adelina?

11. The story opens and closes with "Adelina" chapters. Do you think this was a conscious decision the author made? If so, what is the significance of this choice?

12. The main characters in Across a Hundred Mountains are women, several of whom are victims of male brutality or abandonment. What effect do these characterizations have upon the overall message of the novel?

ENHANCE YOUR BOOKCLUB

1. Set the mood with food! However sparse her meal, what Juana eats is often described in great detail throughout Across a Hundred Mountains. Before your book club meeting, look online for recipes (this site has many Mexican meal suggestions: http://www.mexgrocer.com/) for the authentic Mexican dishes and foods that the characters eat, such as quesadillas. Assign different dishes to members in your book club and bring the food to your meeting.

2. Juana ultimately assumes Adelina's identity. Before your book group meets to discuss Across a Hundred Mountains, have fun playing with this theme. Draw names to swap "identities" with another member in your club, and come dressed up as that member for your meeting. Everyone in the group can take turns guessing who each person has become!

3. Author Reyna Grande has a comprehensive website: http://www.reynagrande.com/ Before your meeting, read about Reyna and discover what her favorite books are. Read selections from a few of those books and discuss whether they served as literary influences.

Reyna Grande came to the United States at age nine to join her father, who had left her behind in Mexico for several years. She went on to become the first person in her family to obtain a higher education. She holds a B.A. and an M.F.A. in creative writing. Her first novel, Across a Hundred Mountains, received the El Premio Aztlan Literary Award in 2006 and an American Book Award in 2007. Her novel has been required reading at various high schools and colleges across the nation. She is currently at work on a memoir.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Across a Hundred Mountains 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Parts of the book were a little confusing but in the end they came together
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Two2dogs More than 1 year ago
I LOVED THE BOOK, I HAD HEARD MANY MANY STORIES FROM REAL PEOPLE WHO HAVE LIVED THIS EXPERIENCE SO WHEN I FINISHED READING THIS BOOK I JUST SAT AND CRYED FOR THEM ALL, GOD HELP THEM AND BLESS THEM! I'VE NOW GIVEN THIS BOOK AS BIRTHDAY GIFTS TO MY SISTERS, COUSINS AND MY PARENTS CAREGIVER. I CANNOT WAIT FOR REYNA GRANDE'S NEXT BOOK, I CANNOT GET ENOUGH GOOD BOOKS WRITTEN BY GOOD MEXICAN AUTHORS, AGAIN I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AND THIS GREAT AUTHOR TOO. I PROMISE YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesomeness1 More than 1 year ago
This novel was beautifully written and heart wreching. Even though I thought the link between Adelina and Juana was obvious, it was still brilliantly done. Adelina's story however was confusing and I believe it was out of chronological order, but not exactly sure. Everything about this book was sad though, and will leave you thinking how lucky you are.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was a bit confused as to how Juana and Adelina's life came together. But as I got to the middle of the novel the author reveals the link between the two girls. Through out the book I felt so sorry for Juana and the struggles she had to live through. I kept hoping that she would finally find her father and return home to her mother for an ideal ending. Although that was not the ending the author chose, I was satisfied with the outcome. This novel was well written and brought great emotion from me. I found my heart broken in the end, when Ama could not let go of her `Miguel¿ and when Juana and Miguelito released their parents¿ ashes into the sea.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Across a Hundred Moutains surprised me the very first page I read of it.When I read it, made me feel that I was in a small town in Mexico, where a young girl named Juana Garcia lived. This amazing story is about the life of Juana and Adelina Vasquez, two friends that meet in desperate circumstances and help each other to have a better life. Juana leaves her small town in Mexico to find her father, who had left their home to get a well paying job in another country, to help his family from poverty. I really enjoyed this eye catching book because every page was full of interesting situations that these two characters brought. The most important character, Juana, is an eleven year old girl who has seen things that children her age shouldn¿t see. She suffered the terrible memory of her younger sister¿s death, and the changes that her life takes when her father leaves their family. She also suffers because of her mother, Lupe¿s, depression which causes her mother to drink and drink! She is a very strong person, that doesn¿t care about what other people say about her, but sometimes is scared to say things out loud. Trying to cross the border Juana gets caught by immigration and goes to jail. Luckily, she finds a young woman prostitute, Adelina, that helps her survive in an unknown place. What I like is that Juana and Adelina become really good friends that help and support each other in life taking experiences. Adelina was a U.S citizen who left her home to follow her boyfriend to Tijuana, Mexico. Fortunately Juana convinces Adelina to cross the border into the U.S to look for her father and for Adelina to go back with her family in California. She is a kind and caring person but is blind for the supposedly ¿love¿ that she has for her boyfriend. She can be persuaded very easily, which ends in a tragic event. The large theme of this story is illegal immigration, everyday people talk about it in the news. Many people talk about how illegal immigrants should be thrown out the country and never be given licenses. Yet if you read this book, you would get a good perspective on what immigrants have to do to cross the border and have a better life here in this country. It¿s touching and hard to believe the truth of how hard it is to start over and have better life, and keep moving forward. The author¿s voice leaves you in suspense. After I finish a chapter I can¿t stop, because I would want to know what happens next in the plot. The theme that this author has given us is very important because till this day, people are going through what Juana and Adelina went through. Every time I read out of that book I imagine that I¿m there, I feel the sadness and frustration that Juana felt. But, If you want to know if Juana finds her father and if Adelina returns to her family, read this book. And trust me you would not want to put this unbelievable book down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this is a great book. When i opened the book i imediatly fell into the plot. i pictured things in my life that related to it. it was so hard to put down that finished it in two sitting. wonderful debut book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this book would be dull, becuase our school assigned it, but I really enjoyed it. It was good to get a refreshing new view on imigration.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Illegal immigration is something that is alwayz on the news. People are always saying how they should be thrown out of the country.Yet if u read this book you get a good perspective of what immigrants have to go through to get here. This book was great.. i started reading it in the moring and i couldnt put it down... finished the book in one day. Itz a great great book.