Act One, Wish One

Act One, Wish One

by Mindy Klasky

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Overview

(Previously released as How Not to Make a Wish.)

Stage manager Kira Franklin discovers a brass lamp in the back of a prop closet, complete with a gender-bending, wish-granting genie. Her first wish is easy - a job on a prestigious avant-garde production of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Soon, though, Kira wonders how many wishes she'll need to succeed in that dream job. Her growing attraction to hunky actor Drew Myers rubs laconic set designer John McRae the wrong way... And John's stability may be the only thing reining in the increasingly bizarre demands of the play's quirky director.

With her professional reputation on the line, Kira has to wonder: What's a girl to do when she runs out of wishes?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781611383348
Publisher: Book View Cafe
Publication date: 11/14/2013
Pages: 378
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.84(d)

About the Author

Mindy Klasky learned to read when her parents shoved a book in her hands and told her she could travel anywhere in the world through stories.

In her spare time, Mindy knits, quilts, and tries to tame her endless to-be-read shelf.

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Act One Wish One 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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RJoie More than 1 year ago
ACT ONE, WISH ONE by Mindy Klasky is about a professional stage manager (hooray techies!) who is - first and foremost, in her mind - love-lorn. Which is a pity, since she's a put-together, competent stage manager who also has a career worth worrying a little more about. And some incredible friends. But, considering her chief concern in the first chapter is the anniversary of being jilted at the altar (her soon-to-be lack of job the secondary concern), the plot is pretty romance centered, as you might imagine. So, taking in mind that this is a romance set in the theatre, not a theatre story offset by romance, the book was fun. It was, however, desperately clichéd. How much you would enjoy this book really depends how you feel about clichéd romance. In the cast there is: A Love-Lorn, Hard-Working, Unfairly Jilted Romantic Heroine The Handsome, Charming College Frat Escapee The Southern Gentleman - Hard-Working and Soft-Spoken The Encouraging BFFs who Have It Figured Out The Dreaded Ex The New Girlfriend of the Ex And a gender-switching, wish-granting genie (the odd duck in the mix, I'll grant) If you're familiar with your clichés, you'll likely be able to figure out who ends up with whom (and who they end up with along the way). It's not complicated, nor is it empowering. There are times in the manuscript when the main character is a bit too focused on romance and appearance (and the worth that comes with them) for comfort. It's just a simple romance - the predictable chick flick of the written word. I have nothing against them. They're fun on occasion, clichés and all. But this is not the type of book that would be my steady fare. It's too sweet for every day- like Turkish Delight, that sugar and no substance guilty pleasure. The two things that made me very happy with this book (which is what bumped it up to four stars): the respect for the gender-swapping genie, and the theatre. Teel (the genie, who I suspect will show up in the next book) shows up in a new body every appearance. I love it. And, even better, Kira (our Heroine), after struggling to comprehend the extend of the genie's powers, settles into addressing Teel with the pronoun appropriate to the gender portrayed at each visit. There are one or two slips at the beginning, but then it becomes a NON-ISSUE. Teel is probably the best character in the ENTIRE book. Ze is AMAZING - and totally comfortable with zirself. The other good thing was the accuracy with which the theatre was portrayed. It's not glamorous, it's not easy, and it REALLY isn't an atmosphere for anyone who doesn't LOVE it and WANT to be there. Also - TECHIES. I was a techie in college and so often stories about the theatre are stories about the people on stage: actors, dancers, singers, etc. I love me some techie love. And the work Kira does is not diminished OR overblown. It's work. And it's work she loves. The director was a bit of a caricature of the Insane Director, but he was pretty fun. And the Technical Director/Master Carpenter (the story is never quite clear which one he is) is pretty on point. This is the first time I've seen the back and forth between actors and directors and managers - the camaraderie and the frustrations on both sides - depicted without the actors being total snobs or the techs being totally incompetent. It made the reading more fun. B+ - fun characters, accurate portrayal of behind the scenes theatre, somewhat disappointing main character, clichéd
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Act One Wish One was an excellent book, filled with humor and wit. It was highly detailed and entertaining. I recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After enjoying Klasky's "Single Witch's Survival Guide" I decided to give another one of her books a try -- and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The paranormal elements in "Act One, Wish One" are minimal. Teel the genie is fun, but, for me, the real treat was in how Klasky wove together the various plot elements. The gender-bending production of Romeo and Juliet ties to Teel's ability to shapeshift which ties to Our Heroine's romance and body issues. Lots of interesting social commentary here. Recommended to fans of Klasky, as well as fans of the theatre. -- lyradora
Cheryl_Montgomery-Nolan More than 1 year ago
This book is a delightful romp about a girl in a rut. Add in an unpredictable genie, and see what can happen when you get what you wish for!