Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches

Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781581349115
Publisher: Crossway Books
Publication date: 05/31/2009
Pages: 232
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

RUSSELL D. MOORE is dean of the School of Theology and senior vice president for academic administration at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.
He is the author of The Kingdom of Christ and is a senior editor of the journal Touchstone. He and his wife, Maria,
have four children.

Table of Contents

Foreword by C.J. Mahaney 13

1 Adoption, Jesus, and You: Why You Should Read This Book, Especially If You Don't Want to 15

2 Are They Brothers? What Some Rude Questions about Adoption Taught Me about the Gospel of Christ 23

3 Joseph of Nazareth vs. Planned Parenthood: What's at Stake When We Talk about Adoption 59

4 Don't You Want Your Own Kids? How to Know If You-or Someone You Love-Should Consider Adoption 85

5 Paperwork, Finances, and Other Threats to Personal Sanctification: How to Navigate the Practical Aspects of the Adoption Process 115

6 Jim Crow in the Church Nursery: How to Think about Racial Identity, Health Concerns, and Other Uncomfortable Adoption Questions 147

7 It Takes a Village to Adopt a Child: How Churches Can Encourage Adoption 167

8 Adopted Is a Past-Tense Verb: How Parents, Children, and Friends Can Think about Growing up Adopted 189

9 Concluding thoughts 215

Acknowledgments 219

Scripture Index 222

General Index 227

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“Russell Moore has given the church a God-centered, gospel-saturated, culturally-sensitive, mission-focused, desperately needed exploration of the priority and privilege of adoption. Readers will find themselves laughing on one page, crying on the next, and ultimately bowing before God thanking him for adopting them into his heavenly family and considering how to show his love to the fatherless on earth.”
David Platt, President, International Mission Board; author, Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream

Adopted for Life is one of the most compelling books I have ever read—both deeply touching and richly theological. You will never look at adoption or the gospel in quite the same way after reading this book. How could the church have been missing this for so long?”
R. Albert Mohler Jr., President and Joseph Emerson Brown Professor of Christian Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

“Personal, practical, and rich in theology, this book is a ‘must-read’ for anyone interested in adoption. Dr. Moore reveals the love of God through the redemptive beauty of adoption. Whether your interest is personal or church related, this book is for you.”
Kelly Rosati, Vice President for Community Outreach, Focus on the Family

“Anyone who has adopted, who is considering adoption, or who has been adopted should read Adopted for Life. And anyone who wants to a get a glimpse of the greatness of the Father’s love for him or her should read it as well.”
Thom S. Rainer, President and CEO, LifeWay Christian Resources

“This book is for all who have been adopted by God. Moore illumines the beauty and wonder of our adoption in Christ and its profound implications for orphan care. If you want to deepen your worship of the God who adopts, Adopted for Life will serve you exceptionally well.”
Dan Cruver, Director, Together for Adoption; author, Reclaiming Adoption: Missional Living Through the Rediscovery of Abba Father

“This book offers both practical advice and courage to every couple considering adoption. For all readers, it shows how the act of adoption actually reveals core truths about the gospel of Christ.”
Allan C. Carlson, President, The Howard Center for Family, Religion, & Society; Founder and International Secretary, the World Congress of Families; Distinguished Visiting Professor of History, Hillsdale College

“Dr. Moore draws on his family’s own experience with adoption to help others understand that by adopting orphaned children we can grow in love of God and neighbor and come to appreciate more deeply our own adoption into the family of God.”
Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University

“Russell Moore has done the church a tremendous service by reminding us of the call of God to meet the ever pressing needs of these little ones. Read with the intent to obey.”
Johnny Hunt, Former President, The Southern Baptist Convention; Senior Pastor, First Baptist Church Woodstock, Woodstock, Georgia

“I know of no other book so biblically rich, so very practical, and so authentic and heart-felt about the beautiful gift of adoption as this one. It’s a powerfully insightful book of how adoption is a beautiful act of love and mission for the gospel. I pray that God uses it to encourage and impact many, many lives.”
Dan Kimball, Pastor, Vintage Faith Church; author, They Like Jesus but Not the Church

“Russell Moore has out of personal experience and with biblical accuracy produced in this work an understanding of God’s purposes in adoption and its connection with gospel compassion. Every pastor should consider the responsibility he has in making adoption a priority for the church as a viable representation of the gospel doctrine of adoption.”
John MacArthur, Pastor, Grace Community Church, Sun Valley, California; President, The Master's University and Seminary

“Russell Moore invites readers to learn to think of adoption in the light of Christian faith. This is a book not only for those who have adopted, those who may adopt, or those who have been adopted, but for all who know themselves to have been freely adopted by God’s grace.”
Gilbert Meilaender, Duesenberg Professor in Christian Ethics, Valparaiso University

Adopted for Life is a well-written rooting of adoption in biblical theology. Moore shows how churches should view adoption as part of their mission and the difference it would make if Christians were known as the people who take in orphans and make them sons and daughters.”
Marvin Olasky, Editor in Chief, World Magazine

“The care and honesty Russell Moore demonstrates throughout Adopted for Life should inspire every believer to consider God’s heart for children without a family. Just like a parable of Christ, adoption provides a lost world the powerful picture of God’s personal love for his children. The church must take the lead in caring for orphans and at-risk children, so that adoption is once again united with the gospel.”
Mark A. Tatlock, Provost and Senior Vice President, The Master's College

“God is working to bring revival and revolution to his church through orphan ministry, and this book is a must for those who will receive his invitation to consider a fatherless child or simply love them through missions.”
Paul Pennington, Executive Director, Hope for Orphans

“Russell Moore’s life has validated every word he has written. In this book he speaks from his heart, mind, and life to ours about the possibility of incarnating adoption as a fleshed out reality in the world of our own families.”
Michael Card, musician; Bible Teacher; author, A Better Freedom

“Russell Moore challenges Christians to an aspect of Christ’s lordship that many have never considered. His remarkable way of putting our salvation into the context of being adopted into God’s family brings a new perspective on being the recipient of undeserved mercy and grace.”
Jerry Rankin, Former President, International Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention

“James offers this injunction to the early church: ‘Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world’ (James 1:27 KJV). Russell Moore offers a compelling account of these and other lessons of Scripture so that our communities of faith may put them into practice and become more like that ‘shining city on a hill.’”
Francis J. Beckwith, Professor of Philosophy and Church-State Studies, Baylor University; author of Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case Against Abortion Choice

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Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Wellington More than 1 year ago
Ostensibly, this is a book about adoption, but it is NOT limited to prospective parents and their relatives. This is a book that should be read by ALL Christians, single, married, with or without children, young, old, and in between because it is relevant to each of us. In the context of recounting his own journey to adopt two boys from a Russian orphanage following three miscarriages by his wife, Moore takes the reader through some unexpected and profound discussions on such topics as the doctrine of adoption in and through Jesus Christ, financial stewardship, Christian parenting, the ethics of reproductive technologies, the reduction of children to commodities, the Church as true community, spiritual warfare, issues surrounding adoption and infertility, and mission. Of particular value to the average person in the church is what to say - and what not to say - to those who who are considering or have already adopted, and to those couples who have miscarried or are struggling with infertility. Moore is calling for a greater sensitivity and openness in our churches on these issues. Like Martin Luther did with justification by faith, Moore has rediscovered a long neglected Christian doctrine - that of adoption - and from his exposition of it recasts a vision of the church as a community that ministers to the teenage mom, the orphan, the widow, and the stranger. Perhaps the greatest gift of this book is to remind the reader that we are all orphans adopted into the family of God by grace and thus heirs to the Kingdom with Christ as our brother. The temptation will be to file this book under "Parenting" where it will likely remain unread but for a select few; the challenge is to use it for a church wide study on ecclesiology that will cause a major rethink and reorientation of the Church back to the community God intended.
markusnenadovus on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This book was fantastic. As I read this book, I was reminded of the great love that God has for us and how important the theology of adoption is to the Bible. I also walked away more excited than ever about the need and opportunity to apply our spiritual adoption to children in need. Moore's heart and passion for the Gospel and adoption are evident throughout this book. I highly recommend this book to anyone thinking about adoption and anyone who just loves God.
kaykwilts on LibraryThing 7 months ago
If you are looking for a how to book on adoption this is not it. This book was written by a conservative Southern Baptist professor of theology. He and his wife initially has trouble conceiving children so they adopted two little boys out of Russia. He urges couples who are reluctant to adopt to do so rather than spend countless amounts on fertility treatments such as IFV which may or may not work. He states in this book that a child adopted becomes like your own flesh and blood. There is not difference. He explores the spiritual side of adoption in that we as humans are the adopted children of God. He loves us as his own.
bulldog on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Comparing the Christian's adoption by God to the modern practice of adoption, Moore argues that the gospel and adoption are integrally related. Moore walks through the issue of 'why adopt?' - he doesn't deal with all the 'how' questions, but instead focuses on how a biblical theology of adoption is worked out in practice. This book is a compelling read and one that we recommend to people in our church. Its not necessary for you to have adopted, or even be considering adoption, in order to benefit from what he writes.
kpjackson on LibraryThing 7 months ago
When I first received this book (before I looked at the subtitle), I assumed it was going to be a treatment of the adoption of Christians as sons of God through the death and atoning sacrifice of Christ. What I found was so much more. This is an excellent book for those who have adopted, are thinking of adopting, have not ever considered adopting or have decided they will never adopt a child. Within the framework of the adoption of children into his family, Moore sets out to encourage Christian families to consider the real need for adoption and reality of what that means to our families. Deeper still he explores the reality of the Christian's adoption by God and how the one is a reflection of the other.Excellent and highly recommended for everyone.
nesum on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I'm always a little wary starting books like this one because of all of the really bad theology that seems to be filling the shelves of Christian bookstores these days. Normally, if a book calls Christians to good works, it is either under a false Gospel or just a long guilt trip. This is really unfortunate, because the true Gospel is the greatest motivation of all to do good works.From the first section, I realized right away that Russell Moore understood that. His love for adoption does not stem from guilt or trying to earn his way to heaven, but in the understanding that he too was adopted, not because of anything good within himself, but because of the love and goodness of God alone, who calls adopted children to himself from all nations and tribes to be coheirs of the kingdom with Christ.With the Gospel as his constant theme, Moore lays out a theology of adoption that is God-honoring and Christ-centered. I would be much less concerned with the state of Evangelicalism today if I saw more books like this at Christian bookstores.
WellingtonWomble on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Ostensibly, this is a book about adoption, but it is NOT limited to prospective parents and their relatives. This is a book that should be read by ALL Christians, single, married, with or without children, young, old, and in between because it is relevant to each of us.In the context of recounting his own journey to adopt two boys from a Russian orphanage following three miscarriages by his wife, Moore takes the reader through some unexpected and profound discussions on such topics as the doctrine of adoption in and through Jesus Christ, financial stewardship, Christian parenting, the ethics of reproductive technologies, the reduction of children to commodities, the Church as true community, spiritual warfare, issues surrounding adoption and infertility, and mission. Of particular value to the average person in the church is what to say - and what not to say - to those who who are considering or have already adopted, and to those couples who have miscarried or are struggling with infertility. Moore is calling for a greater sensitivity and openness in our churches on these issues.Like Martin Luther did with justification by faith, Moore has rediscovered a long neglected Christian doctrine - that of adoption - and from his exposition of it recasts a vision of the church as a community that ministers to the teenage mom, the orphan, the widow, and the stranger. Perhaps the greatest gift of this book is to remind the reader that we are all orphans adopted into the family of God by grace and thus heirs to the Kingdom with Christ as our brother. The temptation will be to file this book under "Parenting" where it will likely remain unread but for a select few; the challenge is to use it for a church wide study on ecclesiology that will cause a major rethink and reorientation of your church back to the community God intended.
deusvitae on LibraryThing 7 months ago
An excellent work focusing on adoption in terms of the adoption of believers by God in Christ. The author draws from his own experiences in adopting two children from Russia and his work to integrate them into his own family and an American culture that does not know how to handle adoption.The author is Baptist and many of his Calvinistic doctrinal positions are made evident. Nevertheless, he is otherwise quite Biblical in perspective, and much of what he says strikes at the heart of the message of the Gospel. He is quite convicting regarding the importance of adoption in light of the Biblical image of God adopting believers through Christ. Adoption, therefore, should not be seen as second-rate or a "last ditch" proposition in having children. Those who are adopted should feel as naturally part of their families as believers feel with Christ and one another (or, at least, should). If we honor Christ and His work of bringing everyone to Him as equals, then we should honor adoption, even when it seems messy. The book has much theology on which to chew but also the author's story, his encounters with others regarding the adoption, his own path to accepting adoption, and insights and recommendations for people considering adoption or assisting people with adoption. The author also provides advice for churches and their leaders to help facilitate a more "adoption friendly" environment, all of which is based on God's adoption of believers.If one is not a Christian, this book will more likely than not be rather offensive. The author squarely challenges the Darwinist position held by many in terms of gene preservation along with many other social attitudes toward adoption. The author's very convicting statements may also lead to offense in the eyes of many Christians, but sometimes people must tell it as it is. My family is considering adoption, and this book is very encouraging and empowering for those who are considering it. The book is overall quite helpful for Christians considering adoption or who want to be of assistance to those adopting.
HowHop on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This book really grabbed me at first but then lost the strength of its hold as it went on though it continued to remain interesting enough to make it easy to read through. The author presents the analogy of family adoption and the Christian's adoption through Christ as a son of God. This is convincingly and beautifully done as told through the author's own experience of adopting two boys from an orphanage in Russia. There is also much practical advice for families considering adoption as well as for churches and how they can contribute to this neglected missional project. If anyone knows of Christians that are cold to the idea of adoption, put this book into their hands.
robertmccready on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This book provides great insight into adoption. The writing style flows smoothly and the content is easy to understand. Russell Moore's adoption experience provides a significant backdrop for the text. I enjoyed the thoughts Moore provided on the theological underpinnings of adoption as well. I would encourage anyone who has questions practically or theologically about adoption to purchase this text.
bluewoad on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I have six adopted brothers and sisters, so I was quite excited about this book when it was first announced. Thankfully, Russell Moore does an excellent job bringing together the theology of adoption with the 'real world' reality of adoption. He writes with a winsome, accessible style that had me both laughing out loud and fighting back tears. I'm going to recommend this book to anyone and everyone I can think of.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has opened my eyes to the reasons to adopt in a more biblical sense. My husband has already adopted my son and we are hoping to adopt more children already. But this book spoke volumes to me and was so very well written. Thank you Dr. Moore for sharing this with the world.
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The author does a great job of describing how churches should view adoption. I thought some of the information he shared about adoption and infertility were his personal bias and not based on any current research.