The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain
3.9 56

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Overview

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as he was better known was born on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. His father ran a dry goods and grocery store, practiced law and involved himself in local politics after the family's move to Hannibal, Missouri, when Sam was four years old.

Hannibal seems to have been a good place for a boy to grow up. Sam was entranced by the Mississippi River and enjoyed both the barges and the people who traveled on them. When Sam was just eleven his father died and Sam went to work for his brother at the Hannibal Journal first as a printer's apprentice and later a compositor. While still in his teens Sam went on the road as an itinerant printer. In 1857 he conceived a plan to seek his fortune in South America but on the way he met a steamboat captain, Horace Bixby who took him on as a cub riverboat pilot and taught him until he acquired his own license.

This enjoyable style of life, which Twain always spoke of later with special warmth was ended by the Civil War. Twain went west with his brother Orion to prospect in Nevada but in 1862 joined the staff of the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, a paper to which he had already begun submitting his work. Later Twain went to California and submitted "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" to the New York Saturday Press.

By 1871 Twain had published Innocents Abroad and had married Olivia Langdon, the sister of a friend from a socially prominent New York City family. He and his wife moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where they made their family home for thenext 20 years.

Books that he wrote in Hartford confirmed his popular reputation but despite their success Twain found himself in financial difficulty primarily because of his investments in the Paige typesetting business as well as his own publishing company. Eventually Twain was forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain's last major books were successful commercially but they also reflect his increasing pessimism. His satire becomes at times more biting and mean-spirited than it is humorous. Despite the downturn in Twain's outlook in later life and despite the unevenness of much of his work, he remains one of the major writers of the American nineteenth century, and one who has been enormously influential on subsequent writers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781421807676
Publisher: 1st World Library
Publication date: 07/01/2005
Pages: 372
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Mark Twain (1835-1910) grew up in Hannibal Missouri. He began his career as a journeyman printer and journalist. His youthful experiences along the Mississippi inspired some of his most famous works—and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In addition to his well-known works of fiction, he was also a prolific travel writer. Among his best-known works is Life on the Mississippi. He was also a star of the lecture circuit.

Steven Frye is a Ph.D. graduate of Purdue University and Professor of English at California State University, Bakersfield. He the author of Understanding Cormac McCarthy and editor of the 2011 Cambridge Companion to Cormac McCarthy.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn2 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 56 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Huckleberry Finn was once said to be the source of all american literarture. Earnest Hemingway said that and was right. Huck Finn and his friend Jim, a slave, have some amazing and amusing journeys as they travel down the Mississippi River. Recommended for anyone looking for a laugh and a life lesson.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books that I have ever read. It was a really good book but don't read it if you are afraid of a few bad words. But if you do take the time to read the book it is very good and you might even get something out of it. There are a few things in the book that could even be considered a life lessen
Charlottes-son More than 1 year ago
One of the Classics and a great read. Don't be afraid of a few bad words. It is a clear slice of life, all dressed up, just as it was.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Adamfchms143 More than 1 year ago
This book is very hard to read.With southern accents the sentences are like ‘’How we gwyne git em?’’ Its very hard to understand. I understand why the author did this because it was in older times.So the English wasn’t the greatest.When I read this book every time i got to a wierd scentence I had to sound out every word to figure out what the author was trying to say.The story itself wasn’t bad but I had trouble at some parts trying to read.I didn’t like how this book was written.
Natalie_Carlo More than 1 year ago
It was so exciting and marvelous. I thought it was a new adventure each chapter and it was so adorable to experience Huck's and Jim's friendship evolve and grow. I wanted to just keep reading.
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ConfuzzledShannon More than 1 year ago
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a sequel of sorts.  First came The Adventures of Tom Sawyer which Huckleberry Finn was a character in just as Tom Sawyer was in this one.  In this adventure Huckleberry runs away from his alcoholic father and along the way runs into a slave Jim, who is trying to gain his freedom.   As they stop in towns along the river they always seem to run into trouble. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was more enjoyable to read on my own then it was to read for school.   Huck definitely has a original imagination to get them through all the hijinks they go through. I felt that by the Tom Sawyer showed up the book could and probably should have ended.  Many of the people in the town were pretty gullible to believe Huck, Tom and other characters like the Duke or King.  An Interesting read. Not sure I understand why it is a classic except that is by Mark Twain.  I could see the authors humor throughout the book, which he was known for. 
mgoodrich718 More than 1 year ago
Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain <br /> <br /> 3 Stars <br /> <br /> This is the sequel to Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. It starts out were it left off. Huck is kidnapped by his dad who wants his money. His dad is a horrible person and a drunk. Huck meets an escaping slave Jim along the way and they set off in search of the freedom they are both looking for. This of course leads to many amusing adventures. They get into all sorts of things and meet up with a lot of questionable characters on the Mississippi river. Jim gets caught and is being held as a runaway slave. Huck decides that he must go save him even if it means he will go to hell. Arriving at the plantation where Jim is being kept leads to a whole new adventure and the arrival of help to pull off stealing Jim back and setting him free for good.<br /> <br /> This is one of those books that I wish I had read when I was young and was reading adventures like Call of The Wild and the like. I know I would have loved it then. That is the only reason for the 3 stars. It was a good read and amusing but I didn't relate with it as much at this time. The imagination that is involved in these stories is wonderful. I had to laugh at the reasons things were accomplished the way they were so that they would be done right and moral in keeping with stories of great adventurers. Because who could possibly want to do anything the simple way. It did make me long for the days when using that imagination made for the best times ever.<br />
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I never thought I would actually enjoy reading this book but was pleasantly surprised. Twain intertwined good humor with meaningful themes making for a book that made you not only laugh at all the ingenious plotlines but also think about the cruelties of our so-called "sivilized" world. You truly fall in love with these characters. I recommend this book to anyone searching for an adventure, comedy, or heartwarming and meaningful book. An honestly wonderful read.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
everyone who uses the hemingway quote should finish it, where old ernest said you have to quit reading when tom sawyer comes back into the story, because the rest is cheating. 100 pages! the story reaches its natrual, moral, artistic and thematic climax, and the only thing left is for huck to free jim and light out for the Territory--and what does twain do? He drags tom sawyer back into the story, and everything falls apart. and that's the great american novel? no. parts of it are beautiful and the best, like hemingway said, but the ending, twain's overuse of the theme of death and rebrith, and many other artistic faults, which we don't have time to get into, make it a manuscript about twenty drafts and two years from completion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book was good, but at some parts it was kind of boring. The way it is narrated by Huck is perfect, because that's the way people talked at that time. When Jim talked, it was strange, because some words were written wrong and that mixed up what he was saying. I think this is a good book that everyone should read if you have enough time, and is willing to take their time in understanding the book.