The Aeneid of Virgil

The Aeneid of Virgil

by Virgil, J. W. Mackail
3.9 24

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Overview

The Aeneid of Virgil by Virgil, J. W. Mackail

Aeneas flees the ashes of Troy to found the city of Rome and change forever the course of the Western world—as literature as well. Virgil's Aeneid is as eternal as Rome itself, a sweeping epic of arms and heroism—the searching portrait of a man caught between love and duty, human feeling and the force of fate—that has influenced writers for over 2,000 years. Filled with drama, passion, and the universal pathos that only a masterpiece can express. The Aeneid is a book for all the time and all people.

"Allen Mandelbaum has produced a living Aeneid, a version that is unmistakably poetry." — Erich Segal, The New York Times Book Review

"A brilliant translation; the only one since Dryden which reads like English verse and conveys some of the majesty and pathos of the original." — Bernard M. W. Knox

"Mandelbaum has... given us a contemporary experience of the masterpiece, at last." — David Ignatow

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781499618150
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 05/21/2014
Pages: 150
Product dimensions: 6.69(w) x 9.61(h) x 0.32(d)

About the Author

Throughout his life Virgil was a poet and as far as we know had no interest in pursuing any other career. He was born Publius Vergilius Maro in 70 BC near Mantua, in what now is northern Italy. His parents, farm owners, were people of property and substance, if not wealth, and were able to obtain for their son a first-rate education. On completing his education, he returned home and possibly began work on the Eclogues, which appeared between the years of 42 and 37 BC. In 41 BC, the Emperor Octavian (later known as Augustus) confiscated Virgil's family's property, and Virgil was obliged to travel to Rome to negotiate for its return. Fortunately for Virgil, one of the officials secured for him an introduction to the emperor; not only was his land returned, but he also met Octavian's confidant Maecenas, who became Virgil's patron for the rest of his life. An industrious, meticulous writer, Virgil was not prolific. In addition to the ten Eclogues, which apparently took at least five years to publish, Virgil wrote the four Georgics, which took seven years, and the Aeneid, his great masterwork. Virgil worked on the Aeneid for eleven years, until his death in 19 BC. Feeling, apparently, that the epic was still unfinished, he directed in his will that the manuscript be destroyed. To the great fortune of succeeding generations, the emperor, Virgil's most prominent friend and admirer, intervened to countermand this provision. He turned the manuscript over to two of Virgil's friends, Varius and Tucca, to edit only obvious errors and repetitions, without adding to the text. The result of their work is the beautiful and brilliant Aeneid we have today.

Allen Mendelbaum's five verse volumes are: Chelmaxions; The Savantasse of Montparnasse; Journeyman; Leaves of Absence; and A Lied of Letterpress. His volumes of verse translation include The Aeneid of Virgil, a University of California Press volume (now available from Bantam) for which he won a National Book Award; the Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso volumes of the California Dante (now available from Bantam); The Odyssey of Homer (now available from Bantam); The Metamorphoses of Ovid, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in poetry; Ovid in Sicily; Selected Poems of Giuseppe Ungaretti; Selected Writings of Salvatore Quasimodo; and David Maria Turoldo. Mandelbaum is co-editor with Robert Richardson Jr. of Three Centuries of American Poetry (Bantam Books) and, with Yehuda Amichai, of the eight volumes of the JPS Jewish Poetry Series. After receiving his Ph.D. from Columbia, he was in the Society of Fellows at Harvard. While chairman of the Ph.D. program in English at the Graduate Center of CUNY, he was a visiting professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and at the universities of Houston, Denver, Colorado, and Purdue. His honorary degrees are from Notre Dame University, Purdue University, the University of Assino, and the University of Torino. He received the Gold Medal of Honor from the city of Florence in 2000, celebrating the 735th anniversary of Dante's birth, the only translator to be so honored; and in 2003 he received the President of Italy's award for translation. He is now Professor of the History of Literary Criticism at the University of Turin and the W.R. Kenan Professor of Humanities at Wake Forest University.

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The Aeneid of Virgil 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
ShelaghAZ More than 1 year ago
...and I mean literally not logically. This particular book is a photocopy of a paperback book so the writing is very small even when put to extra, extra large. The full text is there so I am not disappointed with the material.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This review relates to Allen Mandelbaum's English verse translation of Virgil's -Aeneid-. (Bantam Books; 1961/1981). This edition is excellent for the opening 'life' of Virgil, for Mandelbaum's 'Introduction,' and for his verse translation of Virgil's epic (poem) as well. Mandelbaum's explanation for his own overlooking of Virgil's greatness in his youth because of a tendency to listen to the critical perspectives of others who compared him unfavorably to Homer or because the critic saw the heroes depicted as figures who 'live the cool and limited existence of shadows, nourished by the blood of noble zeal, blood that has been sacrificed in the attempt to recall what has forever disappeared,' all mislead (as Mandelbaum now believes) the reader from truly appreciating the depth and fully human awarenesses that Virgil puts into his epic. Some of the 'Introduction,' is too academic and studied in its inspective fussiness, but then Mandelbaum will come up with something enlivening and satisfying like this: 'Virgil does not have Plato's humor; but he does have Platonic tolerance (and more compassion than Plato). And if the relative weights of the Epicurean, the Stoic, the Pythagorean in him are often hard to assess, his humanity is constant -- and vital, not lumbering, not marmoreal. And not shrill; and when, with the goad of public despair, my own poetic voice has had to struggle often with shrillness, the work on this translation has been most welcome.' Wondrous and insightful. Mandelbaum's verse translation: 'Their minds and hearts were one;/in war they charged together; and now, too,/they shared a sentry station at one gate./ And Nisus says: 'Euryalus, is it/the gods who put this fire in our minds,/or is it that each man's relentless longing becomes a god to him?''
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....! 
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Amazing.....!Excellent......!Just enjoy it.....!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I Find The Fitzgerald and Fagles translations of Virgil's AENEID to be the best readable copies of this classical work- but Mandelbaum's version is a close second in readability & enjoyment. The Nook version of this Bantam Classics paperback is surprisingly clear and easy to read(in the "publisher's default" section of the Nook's font menu). A previous reviewer stated the type/scanning was poor- but I found no typos or anything negative with the eBook. 3 stars.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
What a wondeful translation of Vergil's Aeneid. As a student of the classics, I found Mandelbaum's translation pleasant to read in English, as the verse, which I dislike in most English translations from Latin, flowed smoothly and kept up a lively pace. As a 3rd year Latin student translating the Aenead, it made a perfect reference for checking my translations because it stayed so true to the original Latin without becoming dry to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Aeneid is a great book for an itelligent teenager or interested adult. The book is very detailed and in depth. I would suggest foot notes for this book. It introduces many characters and in depth ideas.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okkk I &hearts Hunger Games not this &#9786